(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Third Report Workers' Compensation Appeals Tribunal 1987-1988"

'r^x 



■.f 



Tf/ 



P 



m 



^\ 



t^ 



Workers' Compensation 

Appeals Tribunal 



Tribunal d'appel 

des accidents du travai 



THIRD 
REPORT 



1987-1988 



it*<' 



GP 

.Zl 

1988 

c.l 

WCAT 



Ontario 



AN^AIS AU VERSO 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/thirdreport8788onta 



WORKERS' COMPENSATION APPEALS TRIBUNAL 

THIRD REPORT 

1987 - 1988 




505 University Avenue 
7th Floor 
Toronto, ON 
M5G 1X4 
(416) 598-4638 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



INTRODUCTION 1 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 1 

THE CHAIRMAN'S OVERVIEW 3 

THE TRIBUNAL'S OVERALL PERFORMANCE 3 

DELAYS IN DECISION-WRITING 4 

AVERAGE OVERALL TURNAROUND TIME 4 

A REVIEW OF TRIBUNAL EXPENDITURES 5 

STATEMENT OF MISSION, GOALS AND COMMITMENTS 8 

THE DETAILED REPORT 9 

A THE REPORTING PERIOD 9 
B CHANGES IN THE ROSTER OF TRIBUNAL VICE-CHAIRS AND 

MEMBERS 9 

C THE RELATIONSHIP WITH THE BOARD 10 

D THE FINAL SAY: THE MOST RECENT DEVELOPMENTS 10 

E THE RELATIONSHIP WITH THE OMBUDSMAN 12 

F ADMINISTRATION AND PROCESS 13 

1. Highlights 13 

2. The Computer 14 

3. The Case Management System 15 

4. Staffing 16 

5. Mail Room and Records 16 

6. Word Processing 16 

7. Intake 16 

8. Tribunal Counsel Office 17 

9. Scheduling 18 

10. The Four-Month Goal 18 

1 1. The Counsel to the Chairman's Office 18 

12. Out-of-Toronto Hearings 19 

13. Representation at Hearings 19 
G INFORMATION DEPARTMENT 19 

1. Library 19 

2. Publications 20 
H CASELOAD AND PRODUCTION 21 

1. The Incoming Caseload 21 

2. The Tribunal's Production 21 
1 OUTREACH AND TRAINING 21 
J FRENCH LANGUAGE SERVICES 22 
K ISSUES ADDRESSED DURING THE REPORTING PERIOD 22 

1. Pension Assessments 22 

2. Pension Supplements 23 

3. Occupational Disease 23 

4. Occupational Stress 23 

5. Time Problems 24 

6. Section 15, The Right to Sue 24 

7. Others 25 



L FINANCIAL MATTERS 25 

1. The Finance and Administration Committee 25 

2. 1989 Budget Preparation 25 

3. Audits 25 

4. Financial Statements for April 1, 1987, to March 30, 1988, 

and for April 1, 1988, to December 31, 1988 25 



TABLE OF APPENDICES 



APPENDIX A 

Statement of Mission, Goals and Commitments i 

APPENDIX B 

Tribunal Members Active During The Reporting Period viii 

APPENDIX C 

Details of the Developing Relationship with the Board xxx 

Schedule 1: Practice Direction No. 9 xxv 

APPENDIX D 

Incoming Caseload Statistics xxx 

APPENDIX E 

Caseload Statistics xxxiv 

APPENDIX F 

Financial Statements for Fiscal Periods xxxviii 

APPENDIX G 

Profile of Representation xliii 

APPENDIX H 

Weekly Workload Statistics xliv 



INTRODUCTION 

The Workers' Compensation Appeal Tribunal is a tripartite tribunal established in October 1985, 
to hear and determine appeals from decisions of the Ontario Workers' Compensation Board. It is 
an independent tribunal separate and apart from the Board itself. 

This report is the Tribunal Chairman's annual report to the Minister of Labour and to the Tri- 
bunal's various constituencies. It is the third such report. As was the case in the previous two 
reports, it is my intention in this report to record the Tribunal's progress over the reporting 
period and to report on matters which, in my view, are likely to be of special interest or concern 
to the Minister or to one or more of the Tribunal's constituencies. 

The two previous annual reports -- the "First Report" and the "Second Report" -- covered the 
Tribunal's anniversary periods (respectively, October 1, 1985, to September 30, 1986, and October 
1, 1986, to September 30, 1987). It has always been intended, however, to eventually move to 
fiscal-period reporting and with this report that transition is made. 

The transition is complicated by the fact that the Tribunal is in the process of changing its fiscal 
period. As of January 1, 1989, we are moving from the Government's standard fiscal period of 
April 1 to March 30, to a calendar-year fiscal period. (This will bring the Tribunal's budgeting 
period into line with the WCB's budgeting period. This is appropriate since the Tribunal's 
funding comes from the WCB Accident Fund). In these circumstances, to change to fiscal- 
period reporting without leaving a gap in the reporting it is necessary for this report to cover the 
period from October 1, 1987, to December 30, 1988 -- a 15-month period. Starting in 1989, 
annual reports will cover the calendar-year fiscal period. 

As mentioned in previous reports, the Tribunal's annual report is the report of the Chairman and 
not of the Tribunal as such. By that is meant, particularly, that in respect of this report, as with 
the previous reports, I have not sought my colleagues' approval for the subjective content. As I 
have said in respect of earlier reports, I do believe that the opinions in this report will be found, 
for the most part, to be generally shared by the members of the Tribunal, and where I have par- 
ticular reason not to be confident on that score I have so indicated. 

The making of what is, in effect, a personal report from the Tribunal Chairman to the Minister 
of Labour and to the Tribunal's various constituencies arises from the fact that the responsibility 
for the creation and operation of the Appeals Tribunal is assigned by the legislation to the 
Tribunal Chairman rather than to the Tribunal per se. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The performance of the Tribunal continues, of course, to reflect the talent and commitment of its 
vice-chairs, members and staff. There is a general tendency to undervalue the contribution of 
administrative tribunal vice-chairs and members. A more dominant role in a tribunal's 
adjudicative activities is typically attributed to the chair of a tribunal than any realistic 
assessment of the inherent limits of his or her personal involvement and influence would suggest 
was reasonable. The Appeals Tribunal has been favoured throughout its short life with a 
complement of exceptionally talented and committed vice-chairs, employer and worker members 
and staff and it is this, more than any other thing, which accounts for the Tribunal's 
achievements. On the subject of acknowledgements, I would be remiss were I not to mention the 
continuing co-operation and assistance that I and the Tribunal have received from the Minister 
and Ministry of Labour and their respective staff and, as well, from the Chairman of the 
Workers' Compensation Board and the Board's staff. 



This reporting period saw a number of transitions within the Tribunal's senior ranks and it is 
appropriate to recognize the special contribution of three particular individuals who played 
especially key roles in the Tribunal's formative years and who have now moved on to other 
responsibilities. 

The departure from the Tribunal in April 1988 of the Tribunal's first Alternate Chairman, 
James R. Thomas, marked the end of a professional collaboration which contributed in a major 
way to the Tribunal's successful launch. As I have said in previous reports, from the outset Jim 
Thomas was my partner in this venture. The appointment in June 1988, of his successor, 
Laura Bradbury, one of the Tribunal's original vice-chairs, marked the beginning of a new 
collaboration which promises to be of comparable importance. 

David Starkman was the Tribunal's first General Counsel, serving in that capacity during the first 
three years of the Tribunal's life. He left that position in September 1988 to accept appointment 
as one of the Tribunal's vice-chairmen. As General Counsel, Mr. Starkman's special 
contributions included the development and operation of the new and contentious concept of the 
Tribunal Counsel Office, the stewardship of the Tribunal's operational interface with the 
communities of workers' and employers' representatives, and the building of the constructive 
working relationship between the Tribunal and the WCB at the staff level. Throughout the 
Tribunal's formative years David Starkman was a major influence. Elaine Newman, a former 
vice-chair is the Tribunal's new General Counsel. 

Maureen Kenny was Counsel to the Chairman from October 1985, until she elected to move into a 
vice-chair position at the Tribunal in July 1987. As Counsel to the Chairman, Ms. Kenny was 
responsible for, among other things, the operation of the Tribunal's process for reviewing draft 
decisions (described in the First Report). In that capacity, during the period of issue-overload 
that marked especially the Tribunal's first two years of operation she was, in all matters of 
intellectual moment, the chair's, vice-chairs' and members' mentor and editor. Her contribution 
in that role to the standards of decision-writing was a major factor in the Tribunal's 
development. Carole Trethewey joined the Tribunal in January 1988, as Ms Kenny's successor, 
and in her hands the office of the Counsel to the Chairman continues its significant role. 



THE CHAIRMAN'S OVERVIEW 



THE TRIBUNAL'S OVERALL PERFORMANCE 

I continue to subscribe to the views I expressed in the Second Report concerning the fairness, 
effectiveness and appropriateness of the Tribunal's adjudication processes, and as to the quality 
and usefulness of the Tribunal's decisions. The tripartite element in the Tribunal's design 
remains strong and highly influential. 

In the employer community, concerns about how the Tribunal views its mandate and its 
relationship with the WCB, and the question of whether, in the workers' compensation field, the 
idea of an external appeals tribunal is, in principle, really a viable concept at all, appear to be 
continuing pre-occupations. The latter question seems, with great respect, to really reflect a 
concern as to whether the system can in fact afford the cost of the legislated benefits if the rights 
to them are to be determined by a truly objective application of the actual law. 

As far as the worker community is concerned, as the proportion of successful appeals -- as 
reported by the WCB -- trends downward, one senses that that community is beginning to worry 
whether the Appeals Tribunal might be in the process of being co-opted -- if, perhaps, only 
subconsciously -- by the Board and the compensation system. 

It will come as no surprise that the experience to date has for me confirmed my original view 
that, in the society in which we now live, for a workers' compensation system to be appropriate 
in principle and in the long run to be acceptable in practice, it must be and be seen to be 
governed by the rule of law. The experience of this Tribunal has shown, I believe, that an 
external appeals tribunal is an essential prerequisite to that end. 

I remain confident that the relationship between the Appeals Tribunal and the WCB will continue 
to develop constructively and that the mature relationship which may be expected to emerge from 
the present developmental phase will be sensible and viable. 

As far as the possibility of co-option is concerned, it is well understood that system co-option of 
any supervising agency is inherently always a risk. In the workers' compensation system that risk 
runs side-by-side with the risks of Tribunal co-option by the worker or employer communities. 
All a tribunal can do is to arm itself against such tendencies by maintaining in the minds of its 
members a lively consciousness of the inherent dangers. 

The downward trend in the proportion of appeals which are successful, in fact reflects, I believe, 
the natural result of an external appeals tribunal's inherent influence on the Board's adjudication 
processes. It is no reflection on the previous WCB administration to recognize that the 
introduction of an external appeals mechanism in which the decisions of Board adjudicators are, 
routinely, publicly reviewed by experienced, outside experts was bound to lead to more carefully 
considered -- and thus better -- Board adjudication. The improved quality of written reasons in 
the Hearings Officers' decisions which is increasingly the subject of comment within the Tribunal 
is the most obvious evidence of that developing reality. The presence of an external appeals 
tribunal also has a natural influence on the care the Board takes to ensure that the requirements 
of the Act are reflected in new policy initiatives. 

The Board's statistics indicate that in respect of cases involving questions of entitlement or 
quantum, successful appeals are increasingly, predominately attributable to differences only in 
the findings of fact. Cases in which successful appeals are attributable to differences between the 
Board and the Appeals Tribunal in the interpretation of law or policy are now relatively 
uncommon -- in the order of only 10 per cent of all successful appeals. 

As the Tribunal's and Board's views of the law increasingly converge -- not through co-option of 



the Tribunal by the Board (or visa-versa) but through the continuous, and public, reasoned 
review of legal issues by both the Board and the Tribunal which the system now promotes -- the 
proportion of appeals which turn on differences concerning issues of law or policy will continue 
to diminish. Increasingly, the proportion of successful appeals will reflect only the baseline 
tendency in contentious cases for single Hearings Officers and tripartite Tribunal hearing panels 
(often working with more developed evidence) to differ in their respective interpretation of the 
evidence regarding the medical or other facts in a case. The trends now emerging from the 
Board's data suggest to me that in the long term the proportion of appeals which are successful 
may be expected, in entitlement or quantum cases, to settle ultimately at around the 30 to 35 per 
cent level. 



DELAYS IN DECISION- WRITING 

Delays in the decision-writing process after the hearing has been completed -- a persisting 
consequence of the Tribunal's birthing process to which I made considerable reference in the 
Second Report — is, I am pleased to report, no longer a problem. 

In the calendar year 1988, there were 781 hearings for which decisions were released by year- 
end. The average completion time for these decisions from the point when the decision was 
ready to be written to the date of its release was 69 days (2.3 months). These included cases 
involving panels chaired by both full- and part-time vice-chairs. If only the decisions by panels 
chaired by full-time vice-chairs are counted, the average release-time drops to 50 days (1.7 
months). For administrative reasons, decisions drafted by part-time vice-chairs will always take 
somewhat longer to complete. 

In my opening remarks on the occasion of the Tribunal's third annual appearance before the 
Legislative Standing Committee on Resources Development (on May 26, 1988, reported in 
Hansard, vol. R-8, p. R-183), I made extensive reference to the decision-delay problem. I made 
particular mention at that time of the special problem the Tribunal was experiencing in 
completing decisions in a batch of particularly old cases. At that time, that batch consisted of 
approximately 100 cases. By the end of the reporting period all but eight of those cases had been 
released. 

An important overall indicator of the substantial reduction in the decision-making time 
experienced throughout the Tribunal since the Second Report is the fact that the current 
inventory of cases ready-to-write but not-yet-released has decreased over the reporting period 
from 525 (in October 1987) to 270 (in December 1988). 



AVERAGE OVERALL TURNAROUND TIME 

On the question of the total time that it takes for a case to typically make its way through the 
Tribunal's complete process -- from filing of the appeal to release of the decision after 
completion of the hearing -- concerns continue to be expressed by the worker and employer 
communities. The Minister of Labour has been particularly interested in ensuring that all 
possible measures for reducing the average turnaround time have been exhausted. 

The Tribunal, of course, has had the turnaround question under continual review, and in June 
1988, I was able to respond to the Minister's concern by indicating that I thought it was now 
possible that the Tribunal could re-organize its procedures, in particular its pre-hearing 
procedures, in such a way as to reduce its overall average turnaround time to four months. This 
was possible, I had by then, come to believe, without affecting the appropriateness or effective- 
ness of the adjudicative process or the quality of the Tribunal's decisions. 



The re-structuring of the Tribunal's procedures with a view to achieving an average turnaround 
time of four months is now being implemented. The restructuring which has been implemented 
or at least approved as of the end of the reporting period may be summarized as follows: 

1. Appeals are now not processed until representatives have confirmed that they are ready to 
proceed, and all the necessary administrative information has been provided on a Hearing 
Application Form. 

2. Case descriptions are to be prepared by the Tribunal Counsel Office, in a simplified, 
standardized format, at the beginning of the process. Where necessary, additional preparation or 
work-up by TCO will take place after the case description has been completed. In that event, 
the case description will be augmented by subsequent addenda. 

3. The scheduling of the hearing date will proceed as soon as the case description is released. 
Additional preparation or work-up will, therefore, now be performed, working against a fixed 
hearing date. 

4. Hearings in Toronto will be scheduled within six weeks after the parties receive the case 
description. If the parties cannot agree on a date within that period, the Scheduling Department 
will assign a date. 

5. Decision release is targeted for six weeks from the date of the hearing or six weeks following 
the receipt of post-hearing evidence and submissions. The target will not be realistic in all 
cases, but the system will require internal explanations if the target is to be substantially 
exceeded. 

By the end of the reporting period, persons now appealing questions of entitlement and quantum 
not involving especially difficult or novel issues, and which do not require further medical or 
other investigation, and who are themselves able to proceed as quickly as possible, can expect to 
have a hearing of their appeal in Toronto completed within two and one-half months of comple- 
tion of the application form, and to receive a decision within another one and one-half months. 
Section 77 and section 21 appeals can now typically be heard and disposed of within three to four 
weeks. 

These projections apply only to Toronto hearings. Hearings held in out-of-Toronto locations are 
usually subject to additional scheduling time, as it is impracticable to schedule hearings in those 
locations on an everyday basis. 

It is too early to be confident that the goal of an average four month turnaround time for all 
cases heard in Toronto is, in fact, wholly achievable, but definite progress in that direction is 
now being made. 



A REVIEW OF TRIBUNAL EXPENDITURES 

How much the Tribunal is costing and whether the Tribunal's management is providing adequate 
fiscal control are questions which are naturally of continuing special interest, particularily to the 
employer community. They are also questions which have been awkward to address during the 
years when the Tribunal was being created from scratch. To date we have responded to those 
concerns by merely publishing our financial statements and budgets. 

During the period covered by this report, however, the Tribunal believes that it came to the end 
of its developmental period. It reached the point where for purposes of budgeting and control of 
the growth of expenditures it was right to recognize that the Tribunal should now be considered a 
mature organization. The 1988/89 operating budget (submitted to the Minister of Labour in 



December 1987), represents a resource base which should now be regarded, from an overall 
perspective, as generally sufficient for the Tribunal to meet its current statutory responsibilities. 

In a memorandum from the Chairman to the Tribunal's Standing-Committee Chairs and the 
Tribunal's Department Heads in April 1988, that proposition was expressed in the following 
terms: 

We have reached the point where it seems at least a reasonable tactic of 
fiscal responsibility, as we head into the development of the J 989 
calendar year budget, to adopt as an operating premise the assumption 
that the organization has at this point reached the point of maturity and 
that the budget of 1988/89 represents a resource base that is, from an 
overall perspective, sufficient for the Tribunal to meet its responsibilities. 

That assumption may in due time prove to have been premature. However, 
we have, in my opinion and in the opinion of the Finance and 
Administration Committee and of the Executive Committee, reached the 
stage where if we do not draw a line and begin to manage the growth of 
our resource requirements in a manner appropriate to a mature, as 
opposed to an experimental, organization, we begin to risk confusing 
needs with wants. 

The development of the 1989 budget was also the occasion for the Tribunal to engage in an 
especially thorough review of its financial requirements. This seems, therefore, a time when it 
would be appropriate to provide a more accessible public record of the Tribunal's fiscal 
management during its developmental stage. 

The development of the Tribunal's organization involved three major phases. It began with the 
theoretical formulation of the Tribunal in the summer of 1985, during my time as Chairman, 
pro tern . That formulation was based on no more than speculation about all of the operating 
variables -- incoming caseload, preparation time, hearing time, decision-writing time, etc. No 
hard information about any of these cost-determining factors was available and none could be 
developed until the Tribunal was in operation. The formulation was doubly problematic because 
it was focussed on an adjudication model that was novel and untested. (The adjudication model 
was novel because the Tribunal's adjudication assignment, as defined by the legislation and by 
the operating circumstances of an external appeals tribunal in the workers' compensation field in 
Ontario in 1985, was unprecedented.) 

In October 1985, the Tribunal began operations and thereupon embarked on the experimental 
phase of its development. The chairman and alternate chairman took up their positions on a 
full-time basis on October 1, 1985, and the first round of Order-in-Council appointments of 
panel members and vice-chairmen was made early in October. The recruitment and training of 
staff and the requisition of materials and equipment all commenced, for all practical purposes, on 
October 1. The Tribunal's first hearing was held in November 1985, and a few more were held 
in December of that year. The first decision was issued on December 9, 1985. The number of 
hearings gradually built up over the ensuing months, and in September 1986, when the second 
round of Order-in-Council appointments came on stream, the Tribunal finally came to the end of 
its experimental phase and reached, for the first time, what could be regarded as a truly 
operational status. During the experimental phase, the adjudication process and the organization 
of the support services that served it were constantly adjusted in response to the developing 
experience. 

In or about October 1986, the Tribunal began what can be appropriately labelled the testing 
phase. We had finally settled on the main features of the adjudicative and administrative 
structure, and it was now possible to begin to test the capacities of that structure in a fully 
operational mode. 



This testing phase led to the identification of resource deficiencies in various areas of the 
organization and to a number of adjustments in that regard, many of which were dealt with in 
the 1988/89 budget submission in December 1987. As indicated above, we believe it is right to 
recognize that in or about April 1988, about two and a half years after its creation, the Tribunal 
could properly be said to have emerged from the testing phase and to have become a mature 
organization. 

The one reservation which I have with respect to the last conclusion concerns the Tribunal's 
computer facilities. The computer systems, and particularily the case management system, are 
still in the experimental phase. We are approaching, but have not yet reached, a point of decision 
concerning computer system enhancements and the nature of the Tribunal's future use of 
computers. This decision will have considerable capital cost implications, and the Tribunal 
cannot be said to have been fully defined as far as its structure and systems are concerned until 
that decision is made. 

As most people will by now understand, the Tribunal's expenses are paid out of the WCB's 
Accident Fund. However, to protect the Tribunal's independence. Tribunal budgets do not 
require WCB approval. In the Memorandum of Understanding with the Minister of Labour, the 
Tribunal Chairman has agreed to submit Tribunal budgets to the Minister of Labour for approval. 

The Tribunal's first budget covered the six-month period from October 1, 1985, to March 30, 
1986 -- the end of the Government's fiscal period. The budgeted operating costs (I will refer 
here only to operating costs and deal later with the capital costs) for this first six-month period, 
which, in the nature of things, reflected no more than a series of educated guesses, was $3.68 
million. The Tribunal's actual operating expenditure during that period was $1.24 million. 

The second budget, which was submitted in January 1986, at a time when our experience with 
the operation of the Tribunal was still rudimentary, and which covered the full fiscal period 
April 1, 1986, to March 30, 1987, was $7.69 million. The Tribunal's actual operating expenditure 
for that period was $5.71 million. 

The third budget, prepared in November 1986 -- only about four months into the testing period 
-- covered the fiscal period, April 1, 1987, to March 31, 1988. The operating expenditure figure 
in that budget was $8.23 million, and the actual expenditures for that period turned out to be 
$7.38 million. 

The 1988/89 budget, prepared in December 1987, was the first budget to be prepared with the 
advantage of a realistic operating experience adequate for the purpose. That budget covered the 
period April 1, 1988 to March 31, 1989. The operating expenditure figure in that budget was 
$8.38 million. As will be seen from the financial reports which appear later in this Report, the 
decision to move to a calendar-year fiscal period was taken in the middle of the 1988/89 fiscal 
period and, for that purpose, the 1988/89 budget was ultimately reworked to cover only the 
nine-month period from April 1, 1988, to December 31, 1988. The pro-rated operating 
expenditure budgeted for that period was $6.28 million. During that period the Tribunal actually 
spent $5.98 million. 

The Tribunal's total capital expenditure from October 1, 1985, to the end of this reporting 
period, is $2.42 million. 



STATEMENT OF MISSION, GOALS AND COMMITMENTS 

The special study of the Tribunal's budget undertaken in the course of preparing the 1989 
calendar-year budget was the occasion for the Tribunal to review its mission, goals and 
commitments. A formal Statement of Mission, Goals and Commitments was officially adopted by 
the Tribunal effective October 1, 1988 -- the Tribunal's third anniversary. That statement 
represents a carefully considered Tribunal-wide view of the Tribunal's basic mandate as that 
mandate is understood after three years of operational experience. It is, if you will, a charter of 
the Appeals Tribunal's obligations and goals. 



The approved Statement may be found in Appendix A. 



THE DETAILED REPORT 



A. THE REPORTING PERIOD 

This report covers the fifteen months from October 1, 1987, to December 31, 1988. The reasons 
for this extended reporting period have been explained in the Introduction. 



B. CHANGES IN THE ROSTER OF TRIBUNAL VICE-CHAIRS AND MEMBERS 

During the reporting period, there were a number of changes in the roster of vice-chairmen and 
employer and Worker Members. In addition to the changes noted in Appendix B, a number of 
other changes occurred. 

Four, new, full-time vice-chairs were appointed during the reporting period. One of these was 
appointed to a new position, and three were appointed to fill vacancies caused by resignations. 

The one appointment to a new position was forecast in the Second Report. In that Report, I 
noted that provisional arrangements for two possible, additional, full-time vice-chair positions 
had been made in the 1986/87 Tribunal Budget, and that one of these had been filled in August 
1987. The need to fill the second position became apparent towards the end of 1987. 

The three vacancies were created by the appointment of Kathleen O'Neil to the Ontario Labour 
Relations Board, Jim Thomas' resignation to take up a senior position with the Ontario 
Government, and the resignation of Elaine Newman to accept appointment as the Tribunal's 
General Counsel upon the resignation from that position of David Starkman. 

Jean Guy Bigras, who had originally been appointed a part-time vice-chair on May 14, 
1986, was appointed to the second new full-time vice-chair position on December 17, 1987. 

The three vacancies were filled as follows: 

John Moore, originally appointed as a part-time vice-chair on July 16, 1986, was appointed full- 
time on May 1, 1988; David Starkman, who had previously been the Tribunal's General Counsel, 
was appointed on August 1, 1988, to fill the vacancy created by Laura Bradbury's move into the 
Alternate Chairman's position upon the departure of Jim Thomas; and Zeynep Onen, formerly 
the Senior Counsel in the Tribunal Counsel Office, was appointed to take Elaine Newman's 
vice-chair position on October 1, 1988. 

The filling of the second new position brought the Tribunal's total of full-time vice-chairman to 
ten (including the Alternate Chairman who is also a vice-chair). 

Amongst the full-time employer and worker Member positions, four adjustments occurred. 
Frances Lankin, formerly a full-time Member representative of workers accepted a full-time 
position at O.P.S.E.U., and was appointed a part-time worker Member on February 25, 1988. 
The vacancy in the full-time worker Member positions created by this move led to the 
appointment on June 11, 1988, of Ray Lebert, who, prior to his appointment, had been Financial 
Secretary-Treasurer of C.A.W. Local 444, and had been extensively involved in the C.A.W.'s 
workers' compensation activities. David Mason's retirement, on September 30, 1988, from his 
full-time position as a Member representative of employers was the occasion for the change of 
Martin Meslin's part-time appointment as employer Member to a full-time appointment on 
August 1, 1988. 



Some additions to the part-time roster of appointments also occurred during this period. Marsha 
Faubert, Karl Friedmann, and Joy McGrath were appointed part-time vice-chairs. Mark 
Cabinet, Sara Sutherland, Gerry Nipshagen and Allen Merritt were appointed part-time members 
representative of Employers. As previously noted, Frances Lankin was appointed a part-time 
Member representative of workers. 

A list of all active Tribunal vice-chairmen and members together with a short resume for each 
may be found in Appendix B to this report. 



C. THE RELATIONSHIP WITH THE BOARD 

During this reporting period, the relationship between the WCB and the Appeals Tribunal has 
continued to evolve. It remains co-operative and constructive despite the challenges posed by a 
series of interactions between the Board and the Tribunal around a number of key, substantive 
compensation issues. An account of these interactions is important if the nature of this 
developing relationship is to be understood. Since this relationship is of central importance to the 
appeals system, I have thought it important to provide a full account, and because of the fullness 
of that account I have also thought it sensible to put that account in Appendix C of this report, 
where interested readers may find it, and others will not be troubled by its length. 



D. THE FINAL SAY: THE MOST RECENT DEVELOPMENTS 

At the end of the reporting period covered by The Second Report the question which arises under 
the terms of section 86n of the Act as to who, between the WCB Board of Directors and the 
Appeals Tribunal, has the final say on issues of general law and policy had not been resolved. No 
occasion for the Tribunal to interpret the section had arisen. Thus this crucial final piece of the 
overall, system design had not yet fallen into place. 

As of the end of the second reporting period, it had appeared that such an occasion was imminent 
in the board of directors' 86n review of the Tribunal's Decision No. 72 (July 21/86). 

Decision No. 72 was the decision in which the Tribunal held that a sudden unexpected injury -- 
such as a disc protrusion in the back -- occurring in the ordinary course of a worker's routine 
employment activities was a personal injury by chance event as that condition is defined in the 
Workers' Compensation Act. The decision followed Canadian and English judicial authorities in 
holding that a chance event could be either an unexpected cause or an unexpected result. 
Decision No. 72 had been the focus of very considerable controversy in the employer community 
in Ontario, and it was the first case which the WCB board of directors elected to review under 
the provisions of section 86n. 

The board of directors' review decision issued on September 28, 1988. The majority of the board 
disagreed with the Appeals Tribunal's application of the above-mentioned judicial authority. 
Noting certain differences in the textual context between the Workers' Compensation Act as it 
presently exists in Ontario, and the legislation considered by the Supreme Court of Canada, and 
the English Court of Appeal and House of Lords in decisions relied on by the Appeals Tribunal, 
the board concluded that those decisions were properly distinguishable and not applicable to the 
Ontario Act. 

Part of the textual difference to which the board of directors' decision referred was the 



introduction in the Ontario Act in 1965 of the "disablement" element of the definition of 
"accident". Previously, the definition of accident had included only chance events and wilful 
misconduct (not being the conduct of the worker). The 1965 amendment had expanded the 
definition to make it explicit that injuries arising out of employment were compensable whether 
or not an accident in the nature of an external chance event had occurred. 

At first blush, it would not, therefore, seem to matter whether an injury was seen to be caused 
by an accident in the nature of a chance event or by an accident in the nature of a disablement. 
Both would be "injuries by accident" within the meaning of section 3(1). However, there is a 
practical reason why it is important to determine whether sudden and unexpected injuries not 
caused by any external chance event fall within the chance-event branch or the disablement 
branch of the definition of accident. The reason is that if they fall within the former, the 
worker has the advantage of a statutory presumption whereby sudden injuries occurring in the 
course of employment are deemed to have arisen out of employment, unless the contrary can be 
shown. The presumption clause (section 3(3)) does not apply to causes of injuries within the 
disablement branch of the definition. In Decision No. 72^ the Hearing Panel had applied the 
chance-event part of the definition of accident and had relied on the presumption clause in 
finding that the worker's injury had arisen out of her employment. 

Appreciation of the foregoing detail concerning the Decision No. 72 issue is necessary context for 
understanding the events which have followed the board of directors decision in its 86n review of 
Decision No. 72. 

The board of directors' decision was unexpected in one particular. Notwithstanding that it had 
concluded that the Tribunal had been wrong in its interpretation of the definition of accident as 
it applied to sudden injuries not associated with external chance events, the board of directors 
did not direct the Tribunal to reconsider the case in the light of the boards' different 
determination on that issue, as section 86n provides. 

The board's reason for not directing a reconsideration under these circumstances was the fact that 
the worker had been the butt of a prolonged and complicated process the predominant purpose of 
which was not determination of her particular rights but the settling of a fundamental principle 
of general importance to the system at large. The board thought it inappropriate in these 
circumstances to subject the worker to the further extended period of anxiety which would be 
involved if the Tribunal were directed to reconsider its decision. The board directed that the cost 
of the benefits not be assessed against the account of the worker's employer but that it be 
absorbed under the WCB's SIEF fund. 

Despite the WCB's board of directors' decision not to direct the Appeals Tribunal to reconsider 
Decision No. 72, the WCB's staff's position was that the determination of the majority of the 
board of directors on the issue of interpretation in Decision No. 72 would now govern the WCB's 
decisions in future similar cases and should govern the Tribunal's future decisions as well. The 
board of directors' decision did not itself address the question of the effect of its decision on 
future cases. 

The board of directors' decision not to direct a reconsideration of Decision No. 72 meant that the 
Appeals Tribunal was not called on to consider in that case whether section 86n(l) gives the final 
say on issues of policy and general law to the Tribunal or to the board of directors. At the same 
time, however, the Board's staff had begun to operate the Board's adjudication system on the 
basis of the staff's view that the section gives the final say to the board of directors. 

In these circumstances, as Chairman of the Tribunal, I was concerned that the public should be 
aware of the issues raised by the board of directors' decision which from the Tribunal's 
perspective were still outstanding. I was also interested in providing the worker and employer 
communities with an opportunity to make their position on those issues known to the Tribunal 
panels which might be called upon to deal with the effect of the board of directors' 



determination in cases involving the presumption clause and sudden and unexpected injuries not 
caused by external chance events. 

Accordingly, I wrote the Chairman of the Workers' Compensation Board a letter which I copied 
to the parties and to all of the participants in the board of directors' section 86n review of 
Decision No. 72. In that letter, I identified what I saw to be the outstanding issues and invited 
written submissions. I indicated any submissions received would be provided to any Tribunal 
panel dealing with a case in which these issues arose. 

The issues as I set them out in that letter read as follows: 

1. Given that the WCB board of directors' determination in its 86n review of Tribunal Decision 
No. 72 concerning the meaning of "personal injury by accident" differs from the Tribunal's 
decision in that regard, if the board had, as provided in section 86n(l), directed the Tribunal to 
reconsider its decision in that case in the light of that determination, would the board's 
determination have been binding on the Tribunal in the Decision No. 72 case without further 
question? 

2. If it would have been so binding on the Tribunal in the Decision No. 72 case, is it also binding 
on the Tribunal in future cases of a like nature? 

3. Does the fact that the board of directors did not direct the Tribunal to reconsider in Decision 
No. 72 affect the answer to Question 2? 

4. If the answer to question 1 or 2 is no, what, then, is the nature of the Tribunal's obligation 
with respect to a board of directors' determination of an issue of policy and general law pursuant 
to a section 86n review: In the case under review? In future cases of a like nature? 

Up to the end of this Report's reporting period, no case requiring that these issues be addressed 
had yet arisen at the Tribunal. A number of written responses to the Chairman's letter had been 
received. Most of these declined the invitation to make submissions at this time and requested, 
instead, an opportunity to do so in the first case in which the issues arise for actual decision. 

The upshot is that we come to the end of this reporting period -- into the Tribunal's fourth year 
of existence -- with the key issue of the ultimate effect of section 86n still unresolved. 

E. THE RELATIONSHIP WITH THE OMBUDSMAN 

During the reporting period, the Ombudsman brought to our attention a total of 113 complaints 
which he had received concerning the Tribunal's decisions. Almost without exception, these 
complaints concerned the substantive merits of adjudicated decisions. By the end of the 
reporting period the Ombudsman had completed his investigation in 37 of these cases and in all 
but one he concluded that the Tribunal's decision could not be said to have been unreasonable. 
The status of the one adverse report is discussed below. 

As indicated in the Second Report, the Tribunal Chairman has conceptual difficulty with the 
implications for an adjudicative tribunal of the Ombudsman reviewing the merits of the 
tribunal's adjudicated decisions. This is not a difficulty, it behooves me to say, that is shared by 
all of the members of this Tribunal. It appears to be shared, however, by a majority of them. 
This conceptual problem has caused the Tribunal to consider very carefully its responses to 
communications from the Ombudsman as they concern complaints about the merits of its 
decisions. 

The relationship between the Tribunal and the Ombudsman in respect of the Ombudsman's 
investigation of the merits of the Tribunal's adjudicated decisions was, of course, relatively 

12 



straightforward so long as the complaints were held to be unfounded. The Tribunal co-operated 
in such cases by providing copies of its files. However, as a matter of principle, its standard 
reply to the Ombudsman's standard request for an initial response to a complaint about the merits 
of a decision was to refer the Ombudsman to the full explanation contained in the Hearing 
Panel's published decision. 

In the one case in which the Ombudsman's investigation lead him to support the complaint, the 
relationship, of course, began to take on more facets. 

In any case in which the Ombudsman begins to see merit in a complaint, the Ombudsman's first 
step beyond the initial investigation is a letter to the organization against which the complaint has 
been made indicating the Ombudsman's tentative view that the complaint has substance and 
giving the organization the opportunity to examine the case the Ombudsman is making and to 
make representations concerning the remedial recommendation which the Ombudsman is con- 
sidering. The Tribunal Chairman's response to that invitation in the Tribunal's case was to 
indicate that with respect to a complaint about the merits of an adjudicated decision such 
representations from the Tribunal would not be appropriate. Either they would constitute a 
further defence of the decision -- thus constituting an unauthorized supplement or change in the 
hearing panel's published reasons -- or be concessions which the Tribunal was not authorized to 
make except through the proper exercise of its statutory powers to reconsider. 

It is apparent that the opportunity to make representations to the Ombudsman is intended to be 
an opportunity for the organization in question either to persuade the Ombudsman that he has the 
facts wrong or has analyzed them inappropriately, or to fix a bad decision before the Ombudsman 
goes public with his opinion that it is a bad decision. The letter which offers this opportunity is 
explicit in making it clear that failing persuasive representations or other acceptable action, the 
Ombudsman's next step under his legislation is to finalize his decision, report to the Legislature 
and send a copy of the report to the Premier's Office. 

Given that the Tribunal's adjudicators, while officially independent, are nonetheless effectively 
dependent on the Premier's Office for their re-appointment, this is a set of options which seems 
to put the Tribunal in what it might be argued was a rather delicate position under the law of 
bias with respect to any adjustment at that stage of the decision in question. 

In this instance the Tribunal Chairman's response to the Ombudsman was that he did not feel the 
Tribunal could do anything about a potentially negative Ombudsman's report and 
recommendation except to wait until the Ombudsman had reached a final conclusion. At that 
point, the Tribunal would then consider whether the Ombudsman had identified reasons which 
would justify the Tribunal embarking on an exercise of its reconsideration powers, having regard 
to its usual criteria in that respect. The Tribunal could not allow itself to be put in the position 
of activating its reconsideration powers in response to the Ombudsman's tentative conclusion and 
thereby be seen as offering the results of that reconsideration process for the purpose of avoiding 
public criticism of the decision. 

Just as the reporting period was drawing to a close, the Tribunal received the Ombudsman's final 
report in the case in question. His recommendation was that the Tribunal reconsider its decision 
in the case in the light of the Ombudsman's report. As of the end of the reporting period the 
Tribunal's response to that recommendation was still being formulated. 

F ADMINISTRATION AND PROCESS 

1. Highlights 

During this reporting period, the Tribunal's operational experience was highlighted by the 



13 



successful drive to bring the decision-making backlog and decision-making delays under control; 
by the extensive staff efforts in the development of the computer case management system; by 
the highly successful introduction of the office automation computer system; by the appearance 
of the first issues of the Tribunal Reporter; by the opening of the Infomart electronic, full-text, 
all-cases data base, and, in the latter months, by the re-organization devoted to converting to a 
projected, average, total turnaround time for all cases of four months. 

2. The Computer 

During the summer of 1987 the Appeals Tribunal installed a Digital All-in- 1 office- wide 
computer system to provide an electronic office environment including word processing, 
electronic mail, case management information and analysis, and an electronic conferencing 
capability. 

As the computer system was being installed, all staff, vice-chairs and members were trained in its 
use and from the outset the level of acceptance of the computer and enthusiasm for its 
contribution to the Tribunal's work has been exceptionally and surprisingly high. Indeed, the 
demand for access to terminals from vice-chairs and members and other parts of the Tribunal 
almost immediately outstripped the system's planned capacity with respect to the number of ter- 
minals to be serviced by the central equipment. 

In response to these pressing demands the Tribunal elected to experiment with an overload of 
terminals, on the premise that the computer loading was a function not only of the number of 
terminals but also of the nature and intensity of their use. Since the planning of any new 
system's capacity is always somewhat speculative concerning the nature and intensity of the use 
which will develop, it seemed reasonable to challenge the computer's capacity by adding 
terminals rather than allowing a limit on terminals to frustrate at the outset this natural and spon- 
taneous Tribunal-wide embracement of the computer system. 

The computer system was planned to service 54 terminals and we allowed the number of 
terminals in use to grow very quickly to a maximum of 91. 

This experiment has, so far, proved successful. The extra terminals have caused reduced response 
times but not to a level that has discouraged use. 

They have also meant that the computer system load is always too close to the computer system's 
capacity for comfort, but this has had the positive consequence of forcing the Tribunal to be 
creative and conservative in the management of the computer's use in other respects. 
In the meantime, the availability of terminals to most vice-chairs, members and staff who could 
demonstrate a need and an interest has allowed the computer's role in the Tribunal's work to 
develop vigorously and naturally to the tremendous advantage of the Tribunal's productivity and 
effectiveness. The experience has lead us to a number of conclusions about the computer's use. 

For this Tribunal the key activities in the computer system have proven to be: 

(a) Word Processing and particularily the computer's ability to allow those who are drafting 
decisions and other documents -- vice-chairs for example, to have direct hands-on access to the 
document-creation process. 

(b) Electronic Mail - The Tribunal reverberates with instant communications of all sorts, 
which has tremendously enhanced the flow and distribution of information and views. It is 
difficult to evaluate against concrete criteria the significance of this instant communication 
system, but its impact is palpable. For everyone it is now impossible to contemplate operating 
without it. 



14 



The Tribunal has found, on the other hand, that other components of the office automation 
system are not as useful. After a period of experimentation, most members and staff have 
reverted to paper calendars and traditional tickler systems. We have also decided against the 
concept of the electronic office as far as our filing systems are concerned. Concerns about our 
computer's capacity have led us to reject use of the computer as a permanent filing facility 
except with respect to templates and precedent materials and one complete file of released 
decisions. We have come to this decision easily, however, since the advantage of permanent, 
electronic files in the Tribunal's operation could not be readily demonstrated. 

The conferencing facility has met with an uneven response. There seems to be a strong 
instinctive resistance amongst staff and members to a system which appears to have the inhuman 
purpose of replacing face-to-face meetings. And the level of active contributions to the 
electronic conferences is currently not high. The chairman, however, finds the conferencing 
facility an invaluable aid to his consultation processes and is confident that, over time, the 
obvious unique advantages of this system of electronic group consultation to an organization of 
this nature will lead to it becoming an integral component of the Tribunal's communication 
systems. 

The case management component of the computer system is still under development. That system 
is discussed at greater length below. 

3. The Case Management System 

During the summer of 1987, the Appeals Tribunal embarked upon a major strategy to utilize a 
database management system software to manage the file information necessary to prepare a case 
and to undertake a hearing. This advanced file-management system was developed and tested 
during much of 1988. As in any development of a novel approach using state-of-the-art 
technology and software, problems were encountered and overcome. The objective of preparing 
a case management system was met, the testing undertaken to prove the system completed. Fine 
tuning by way of amendments to the programs was also undertaken. 

The Case Management System will not only provide a clear trail of information associated with a 
particular case but will also provide a detailed overview of the operations of the Appeals Tribunal 
on a daily, weekly and monthly basis which will permit administrators to ensure that cases are 
moving through the system in an expeditious manner and to identify process deficiencies. 

Other agencies of the Ontario Government that manage numerous files and documents as part of 
their administrative responsibilities have been watching closely the progress of the development 
and implementation of the Case Management System at the Appeals Tribunal. During late 1988, 
a tape of the Case Management System was prepared for an associate agency within the Ontario 
Government applications. 

The development work has now demonstrated, however, that the Case Management System's 
requirement for computer capacity was underestimated at the outset, and that to implement the 
system on a full operational footing will in fact require a major enhancement of the Tribunal's 
existing computer system. It is apparent that a new decision must now be made as to whether or 
not that further investment can be justified. As of the end of the reporting period that decision 
was on hold, pending a more settled understanding of the existing computer system's capacity 
relative to the Tribunal's needs in the word processing, electronic mail and conferencing areas, 
and the re-stabilization of the Tribunal's case procedures following the changes introduced in 
furtherance of the four-month turnaround goal. 



15 



4. Staffing 

As of the end of this reporting period the staff complement consisted of 75 regular staff, 12 
contract staff, 22 full-time, and 37 part-time Order-in-Council Appointments. The Tribunal 
also continues to employ eight part-time Senior Medical Counsellors. 

The Appeals Tribunal has developed a personnel group to deal with all staff administration 
matters and to co-ordinate staff recruitment. The personnel group includes the Manager of 
Finance and Personnel, a Personnel Officer and a Payroll and Benefits Clerk. The group provides 
a one-stop resource area to deal with all staffing matters at the Appeals Tribunal. 

For the fiscal period of 1988, the Tribunal recruited for 29 staff positions. The vacancies 
occurred in the professional (lawyers and management), technical (computer operator and system 
trainers), and support (secretarial and clerical) areas. Twenty-six of the 29 competitions were 
open to public and were advertised in the Topical and other newspapers. More than 1,300 
applications were received for these 29 positions, and 350 interviews were conducted. 

5. Mail Rooin and Records 

It is difficult to highlight specific areas without acknowledging that the success of an 
organization is based on the participation of everyone. It is important, however, to recognize the 
administrative and support contributions made by the Mail Room and Copy Centre, and the 
Records Office. Specifically the staff in these operations provide the administrative support that 
enables the Appeals Tribunal to undertake its daily business. The Mail Room and Copy Centre 
prepares 333,000 pages of copy material per month and deals with 3,600 pieces of outgoing mail 
per month and 2,000 pieces of incoming mail per month. The Records Room and File Room 
manages 3,000 case files from the Workers' Compensation Board, which are part of the active 
case load at the Appeals Tribunal. It is their responsibility to maintain the security of these 
files, to manage their availability in the Tribunal as required, and, upon completion of a hearing 
and release of a decision, to return the files to the appropriate sections of the Board. They also 
maintain the corporate file records of the Appeals Tribunal. 

6. Word Processing 

An important part of the decision release process, following the actual hearing at the Tribunal, is 
the ability of the Word Processing Centre to prepare drafts and final decisions without delay. 
During 1988, the Centre maintained an average turnaround time of two working days. Examples 
of the work are provided by the month of January 1988 with 429 decision documents and an 
average response time of two days. This two-day average was also evident in December 1988 
with 212 decision documents prepared. The Word Processing Centre is also responsible for 
preparation of other case related documents in addition to the decision release material. 

7. Intake 

A vital link between the Tribunal processes and procedures and employers and workers seeking to 
appeal a Workers' Compensation Board matter before the Tribunal is the Intake Department. 
Intake staff are the primary contacts with people inquiring about their status to appeal a case and 
determine whether jurisdiction exists. Questions of interest and notices of intent to appeal occur 
through letters, telephone calls, and in some instances by people who arrive at the reception desk 
with questions or concerns. In the latter case an intake officer meets with the individual to 
discuss the matter and provides all possible help. At the Tribunal the reception desk is viewed as 
integral part of the intake work because of the wide-range of questions asked about the appeal 
process. 



8. Tribunal Counsel Office 

The role of the Tribunal Counsel Office continues to evolve. It is now accepted that the Tribunal 
requires its own counsel, and that counsel have an important role to play, both before and during 
the hearing. 

(a) The Pre-Hearing Role 

In the third year of operations, adoption of the four-month goal lead to restructuring of the 
pre-hearing administrative processes within the Tribunal Counsel Office. Present process 
requires that Case Descriptions be prepared according to a standardized model, and that a hearing 
date be set immediately upon completion of the Case Description. Case Descriptions are 
reviewed by senior staff to determine the adequacy of medical evidence, the need for 
supplementary factual information, and need for additional legal research or submissions. 

The Tribunal Counsel Office has been increasingly active in preparing and maintaining 
up-to-date summaries of the Tribunal's decisions in respect of particular issues. These 
summaries, called "decision reviews", are frequently distributed to the parties and panels as 
reference material. 

Consultation with parties and their representatives about the Tribunal's process, probable issues 
and applicable law continues to be an important Tribunal Counsel Office contribution to the 
quality and accessiblity of the Tribunal's hearing process. 

(b) The Role at Hearings 

Controversy regarding the role of the Tribunal counsel at hearings continues to recede. Rarely is 
it necessary for Tribunal counsel to participate in a hearing by cross-questioning a witness. The 
role at hearings is clearly one of assisting the panels - commonly by orchestrating the order of the 
proceedings, ensuring comprehensiveness of the record, or by presenting a submission outlining 
the optional analyses available to the panel. 

In exceptional cases, where the jurisdiction of the Appeals Tribunal is in question, or where there 
is some other distinct Tribunal interest at issue. Tribunal counsel are under instructions to 
advocate actively the position which, in their opinion, is the correct one from the Tribunal's 
overall perspective. This aspect of the role was discussed in Decision No. 1091/87 (Dec. 2/87), 
and Decision No. 212/881 (Apr. 8/88). 

(c) The Future 

Within the Tribunal Counsel Office, as in other parts of the organization, the commitment to a 
high standard of quality continues to be challenged by the competing interest in efficiency and 
speed. The tension between these interests will continue to be the major influence in 
determining the agenda for further evolution of the office in the coming year. 

As explained in the Second Report, the Appeals Tribunal has employed pre-hearing panels 
(formerly called Case Direction Panels) in order to enable the Tribunal Counsel Office to seek 
and obtain instructions on matters pertaining to the preparation of a case for hearing. This 
process continued to prove useful, and to be consistent with the model of adjudication adopted 
by the Appeals Tribunal. These panels (now referred to as "Instruction Panels") may be 
approached by members of the Tribunal Counsel Office for instruction on a variety of matters, 
including the necessity for referral of the worker to a medical practitioner for examination, prior 
to hearing. 



17 



As originally conceived this pre-hearing panel direction process contemplated that parties who 
objected to instructions issued to Tribunal Counsel Office by the pre-hearing panel were invited 
to attend and make representations to a Case Direction Panel for purposes of securing a different 
direction. This aspect of the process was described in the Second Report. 

Experience, however, has demonstrated that parties' participation in the pre-hearing 
panel-direction process is not a valuable aspect of the process. 

In the interests of timely pre-hearing preparation of cases, and in the interests of obtaining 
rulings which are sufficiently focussed on the actual requirements of the case, the Appeals 
Tribunal has moved to a usual practice of referring any contentious, pre-hearing question to the 
panel which is scheduled to hear the case. In its discretion, the hearing panel may hear 
submissions regarding that question as a preliminary matter before it hears the merits of the 
appeal, or may choose to defer the issue until the end of the hearing. 

This modification to the pre-hearing process has the effect of allowing the Tribunal Counsel 
Office to maintain an expeditious schedule in its pre-hearing preparation of a case, achieves 
maximal and efficient use of resources in terms of panel time, and assures a high quality of 
decision-making regarding important, pre-hearing questions. 

9. Scheduling 

The Scheduling Department has been reorganized under the direction of an Appeals 
Administrator who has replaced the Hearings Co-ordinator. The new position consolidates not 
only the scheduling of appeals, but also the requests for adjournments, subpoenas, witness fees, 
and all other similar, hearing-related matters. 

At the end of the reporting period, the Scheduling Department was preparing for the change 
from scheduling hearings on consent, to scheduling hearings without consent, if necessary, 
within six weeks after the parties receive the case description. 

10. The Four-Month Goal 

The Tribunal has resolved to provide parties with faster access to hearings and decisions, without 
sacrificing the quality of our decision-making process. To this end, we have focused on 
streamlining our internal procedures. Changes are being made across the organization to 
eliminate periods when files are "on hold"; to provide opportunities for several departments to 
work on a file at the same time; to limit the dead time between completion of the Tribunal's 
pre-hearing preparation and the hearing date; and to provide specific time limits within which 
each department is to complete its work. The sections in the report on the decision-writing 
process, the TCO role and the Scheduling Department, give more detailed information on the 
changes. 

11. The Counsel to the Chairman's Office 

The Office of Counsel to the Chairman continues to play an important role in maintaining the 
consistency and standards of the Tribunal's decisions by reviewing decisions in draft form. The 
Review is usually performed by Counsel, with the occasional involvement of the Chairman. The 
procedure has changed slightly from that discussed in the First Report, since full-time vice- 
chairs are now well acquainted with compensation law and principles and no longer require 
assistance on a regular basis. Accordingly, drafts prepared by full-time vice-chairs are only 
reviewed when the vice-chair idenifies an issue of particular interest or significance. Otherwise, 
the review procedure remains as outlined in the First Report. 



18 



The type of assistance provided by the Office of Counsel to the Chairman is similar to that 
performed by law clerks for superior court judges. Counsel will draw the Panel's attention to 
relevant Tribunal decisions and related law. If this information is especially significant, the 
Panel will send it to the parties and invite further submissions. Counsel will also identify areas 
which appear incomplete or unclear in the draft and shortcomings in the adjudication process 
which appear on the face of the draft. 

The Office of Counsel to the Chairman is careful to leave the final decision to the Panel. The 
general aim of the review is to ensure that decisions are not rendered in isolation, that they meet 
Tribunal-wide standards of quality, and that the Tribunal's case law develops as a coherent body 
of decisions. 

12. Out-of-Toronto Hearings 

During the reporting period, about 40 per cent of the Tribunal's hearings were held out of 
Toronto, and the requests to hold hearings outside Toronto has increased steadily. At present, 
nearly 50 per cent of cases arise out of Toronto. The Tribunal is examining various means by 
which those cases might be heard more quickly, including bringing parties to Toronto if hearing 
schedules become congested in particular locations. 

13. Representation at Hearings 

Statistics on the nature of worker and employer representation can be found in Appendix G. 

G. INFORMATION DEPARTMENT 

The Information Department has responsibility for the Library and Publication functions of the 
Tribunal, offering information services to WCAT staff, and members of the public. 

1. Library 

In its first two years of operation, the Library supplied a wide variety of services to users during 
a period of initial set-up and organization. In its third year, the focus of activity has shifted to 
improving overall access to information and resources. Research into areas such as administrative 
and constitutional law, workers' compensation law or policy, or the medical issues related to cases 
before the Tribunal, is carried out by WCAT staff using a comprehensive book, journal and 
government-document collection and an extensive subject vertical file which is updated daily. 

The Library's holdings are supplemented by means of on-line data retrieval, interlibrary loan and 
use of the resources of nearby libraries. 

The subject vertical files in the Library provide a selection of documents including journal 
articles and reports on a variety of topics relevant to issues before the Tribunal. The vertical file 
is continually supplemented by scanning the current literature for items of interest, by retaining 
copies of articles relating to particular research requests and by referencing titles in journals 
received in the library on subscription. Regular current awareness searches are performed on a 
variety of on-line databases. 

Cardbox Plus information management software, is also used by the library to provide quick and 
easy access to indexed vertical file material and detailed summaries of Tribunal decisions 
prepared by the Information Department lawyers and stored in a DECISIONS database. Using 



19 



this system, details such as dates, panel names, legal and legislative citations, keywords, and text 
words can be searched and sorted for retrieval by staff and visitors using the library's two 
microcomputers. 

In order to further improve access from the outside, records of the Library's book holdings are 
now available to other resource centres using the national UTLAS database network, and copies 
of the Library's databases are now available to outside users. 

The Library staff provide Cardbox training and will do searches for Library users in the Library 
or by phone. When required, the Library will provide floppy-disk copies of the decisions 
database, which can be run by users equipped with Cardbox Plus software. The Canadian Centre 
for Occupational Health and Safety used this service to form part of their CASELAW database 
available through their on-line search service - CCINFO. 

2. Publications 

During the reporting period, the Information Department provided new and continuing 
publications services aimed at making the Tribunal's decisions easily available to workers, 
employers and their representatives. 

The first four volumes of the Workers' Compensation Appeals Tribunal Reporter were published 
for the Tribunal by Carswell Legal Publications. The Reporter consists of bound, book-size 
volumes containing the full text of selected decisions together with headnotes and a keyword 
index prepared by the Information Department staff and various other tables and indices. For 
the next two years, frequency of publication will be increased in order to make decisions in the 
Reporter more current. 

The Publications Department continues to index and summarize all Tribunal decisions. Each 
summary is circulated along with the full decision text whenever a decision is requested. These 
summaries form the basis for a companion database. 

Select decisions are distributed biweekly to subscribers through the Decision Subscription Service. 
Any decision, whether included in the Subscription Service or not, may be obtained individually. 

A number of indices are also available: The Keyword Index - an alphabetical subject word index; 
The Numerical Index/ Annotated Statute - a numerical index containing keywords and summaries 
for all decisions, together with an annotated statute listing decisions under the sections of the 
Workers' Compensation Act and Regulations to which they refer; the Section 15 Index - a 
specialized index of Tribunal decisions and court cases regarding the right to bring a 
civil action; and the Master List of Decisions - a list of all decisions, with release dates and cites 
for the Reporter and Numerical Index. These indices are produced bi-monthly and can be 
obtained for a nominal charge. 

The Compensation Appeals Forum is a journal for analysis and comment from worker and 
employer constituencies and other observers concerning the Tribunal's decisions, processes and 
general compensation principles. The Forum first appeared in October 1986. Since then, other 
issues have appeared, the last dated July 1988. In 1989, two more editions of the Forum are 
planned. The Forum is circulated free of charge. 

The most recent step undertaken by Library and Publications to improve information access is 
the successful collaboration of Information department staff, and representatives from Southam 
Business Information and Communications Group Inc., a private file management service. This 
team has set up and activated a full-text database of WCAT decisions, known as WCAT ONLINE. 



20 



This system offers sophisticated full-text search capacities of much greater power and scope than 
its in-house predecessor. Currently available to WCAT members and staff, remote computer 
access will open up this new system to the public early in 1989. 



H. CASELOAD AND PRODUCTION 

1. The Incoming Caseload 

The number of new cases received by the Tribunal averaged about 130 cases per month during 
the reporting period. Incoming caseload (not counting the inherited backlog) has decreased by 
about 8 per cent in each of the last two years of the Tribunal's operations. 

Details of the caseload may be found in Appendix D. 

2. The Tribunal's Production 

Over the 15 months of this reporting period, the Tribunal disposed of a total of 2,441 cases. 
This figure included cases requiring hearings, and those considered on written material, those 
mediated, and those disposed of administratively. Of the 270 cases in the "ready-to-write" 
category as of the end of December 1988, 69 per cent are cases with a recent hearing date 
(0 to 4 months). 

The ratio of decisions released in a month compared to hearings held in that month -- a rough 
indicator of whether we are winning or losing -- had stabilized at 127 per cent by December 
1988 -- that is, for the last several months in the reporting period we had consistently released 
about 30 per cent more decisions than we have held hearings. This reflects the continuing 
process of improving the release times of decisions. 

Further details of the Tribunal's production may be seen in Appendix E and H. 

I. OUTREACH AND TRAINING 

The Appeals Tribunal continues to serve its commitment to assist the worker and employer 
constituencies in their need to understand the Tribunal's role, and to improve their abilities to 
work within the appeal structure. The Outreach and Training Committee, a tripartite committee 
of panel members and its supporting staff, continue to receive invitations to speak at 
conferences, and participate at workshops and seminars. 

In the past year, the Appeals Tribunal has expanded its efforts to meet the commitment toward 
public education. It has also modified the delivery of its presentation to a form which will enable 
access to as wide an audience as possible. This was accomplished, in part, by the production of a 
video tape dramatization of an average hearing at the Tribunal. Scripted from a variety of 
typical entitlement cases, the film was professionally produced and demonstrates the highlights of 
a typical Appeals Tribunal hearing. A facsimile of a Case Description, and workshop exercises in 
written form supplement the video tape for teaching purposes. Entitled, "Final Appeal", the tape 
is available on loan through the Appeals Tribunal library. Any interested group may ask the 
Outreach and Training Committee for a presentation to a particular audience, which is based on 
the video tape, or any other aspect of the workings of the Appeals Tribunals which are of interest 
to it. 

To date, the video tape has been shown widely across the province, to a variety of conference 
audiences and seminar participants. The reaction of those audiences has been entirely positive. 

21 



In particular, audiences unfamiliar with the appeal system at the Tribunal express a basic 
understanding of the process after having seen the tape. Audiences with greater expertise have 
used the document to focus discussion on particular aspects of the process, or for training in their 
own abilities as advocates. 



J. FRENCH LANGUAGE SERVICES 

The French Language Services Committee undertook a number of projects during 1988 to prepare 
the Tribunal for the implementation of the French Language Services Act in November 1989. 
With the addition of French language resources and bilingual appointments, the Tribunal was able 
during this reporting period to conduct hearings and issue decisions in the French language. 

The Tribunal has decided that it has need for a full-time translator/reviser to assist the Tribunal 
in meeting the needs of French language translation in the preparation of case descriptions, 
decisions. Public Information, and the Annual Report. At present, much of this work is sent to 
outside translators and consultants. It is expected to have the translator in place during the early 
part of 1989. 

Every effort was made to prepare a strong resource base of French language material including 
translation of the Second Report, the Practice Direction Nos. 1 to 9, the Mission Statement and 
the timely release of French language decisions. Work continued on the preparation of the 
French language lexicon covering the special legal and medical terminology involving Tribunal 
decisions. 

The Tribunal has also received strong support from Order-in-Council appointments and staff 
members in attending regular French language training sessions at the beginners, intermediate 
and advance levels. More than 31 individuals took advantage of the French training classes 
which are offered during the lunch hours and evenings. 

The Tribunal recruited a bilingual Intake Clerk to assist with the French Language inquiries 
directed to the reception desk and intake section. This position is in addition to the bilingual 
secretary in the office of the Chairman and a bilingual lawyer in the Tribunal Counsel Office. 

K. ISSUES ADDRESSED DURING THE REPORTING PERIOD 

It would be impossible in a report of this size to review all the important issues -- legal, factual 
and medical -- which have been addressed by the Tribunal in the last 15 months. The following 
is intended to give some idea of the variety of problems which have been considered. 

1. Pension Assessments 

This is the first reporting period during which the Tribunal has heard appeals dealing with the 
adequacy of pension assessments. The inherent difficulties faced by Tribunal panels in reviewing 
pension assessments were discussed in detail in Decision No. 915 (May 22/87); however, panels 
are now gaining experience in this area. 

The usual approach taken by Tribunal panels is to determine the extent of the disability suffered 
at the relevant time; to compare this finding with the Board's findings on disability, and to con- 
sider whether the Board has correctly applied the rating schedule to the disability. See Decision 
No. 381/88 (Sept.2/88). However, as Decision No. 255/88 (May 19/88) noted, the review 
strategy in a particular case must be designed to address the facts and circumstances of that case. 



22 



Pension assessmients have been confirmed in a number of cases where the independent medical 
evidence supported the Board's assessment. See Decision Nos. 282/88 (May 25/88) and 255/88 
(May 19/88). However, in Decision No. 582/88 (Dec. 7/88), the Panel determined that the 
pension assessment did not adequately reflect the role of the work accident in aggravating the 
worker's pre-existing condition. Similarly, in Decision No. 603/881 (Oct. 13/88) a reassessment 
was directed when the Board had failed to consider two aspects of the worker's disability. 

2. Pension Supplements 

The Tribunal has generally taken the position that individual circumstances which may affect the 
actual impact of an injury on a particular worker's earning capacity are not considered in 
calculating a permanent disability pension but under the provisions governing temporary 
supplements and older workers' supplements. Decision No. 447/87 (Feb. 8/88), an early 
supplement case, suggested that the Board might not have the discretion to refuse a temporary 
supplement where the worker had not failed to co-operate or be available for suitable 
employment. However, more recent cases, such as Decision Nos. 124/88 (July 28/88), 212/88 
(Aug. 22/88), and 349/88 (July 27/88) have preferred the analysis set out in Decision No. 915 
and have held that the board has a discretion. However, where the Board does not set up a 
rehabilitation program, a worker may still be entitled to a temporary supplement where he 
conducts himself in a manner consistent with the general aim of returning to work or lessening 
his disability. See, for example. Decision No. 548/87 (July 21/87). Other decisions have 
addressed such issues as the worker's earning capacity. See Decision Nos. 670/87 (Aug. 19/87), 
638/88 (Nov. 9/88) and 510/88 (Nov. 9/88). 

3. Occupational Disease 

Disabilities arising from exposure to chemicals or particular work processes have also been an 
area of concern. Tribunal panels have found that there are two ways of approaching such cases, 
either under the statutory definition of "industrial disease" and related provisions, or as a 
"disablement" arising out of and in the course of employment. As Decision No. 850 (Mar. 2/88) 
noted, the statutory definition of "industrial disease" appears to contemplate a complex medical 
and scientific analysis of whether a disease was "peculiar" to a particular process. The Tribunal 
has generally indicated that the Industrial Disease Standards Panel is better equipped to deal with 
this sort of question and focused on the process of disablement in the case before it. Interesting 
examples of this approach are Decision No. 31/88 (Nov. 30/88), which involved a" chemical 
cocktail". Decision No. 214/88 (May 13/88), which considered "sealed building" syndrome, and 
Decision No. 1296/87 (May 20/88), which involved lung cancer and exposure to chromium. 
In deciding such claims, the Tribunal applies the usual test of whether the worker's employment 
was a significant contributing factor to the disability. Thus, a worker who smokes and 
developed lung cancer will still be entitled to compensation if his or her work was also a 
significant contributing factor. See Decision No. 1296/87 (May 20/88). However, compensation 
has been denied in cases where the worker smoked and the evidence was "equivocal at best" that 
the work place contributed to the worker's condition. See Decision No. 138/87 (Apr. 1/88). 
Decision No. 421/87 (Apr. 22/88) is one of the few cases to consider the statutory provisions 
governing "industrial diseases," and the effect of the s. 122(9) presumption on scheduled " 
industrial diseases." It contains an interesting discussion about the differences between the 
medical and legal approaches to causation. 

The statutory provisions governing who is entitled to notice in an "industrial disease" case were 
reviewed in Decision No. 140/87 (Nov. 15/88). 



23 



4. Occupational Stress 

A related issue which has received some publicity is occupational stress. A number of decisions 
have indicated that disability caused by occupational stress is not in principle barred from 
compensation; however, no case has as yet granted compensation for a claim based solely on 
stress. Decision No. 828 (Jan. 9/87) allowed a claim where stress was one of several occupational 
factors leading to the disability. 

Occupational stress was most fully discussed in Decision No. 918 (July 8/88). That Panel found 
that stress could be compensable under either the "industrial disease" or "disablement" concepts. 
Again, the more extensive evidence necessary to meet the statutory definition of "industrial 
disease", caused the Panel to analyze the claim as a "disablement". The majority noted the 
evidentiary difficulties in determining whether work was a significant contributing factor in a 
mental stress case, given the multitude of non-work sources of stress. In determining whether 
the work was a significant contributing factor, the majority suggested a two-step enquiry: 

(a) Was the worker subjected to workplace stress demonstrably greater than that experienced 
by the average worker? 

(b) If not, was there "clear and convincing evidence" that the ordinary and usual workplace 
stress predominated in producing the injury. 

The majority concluded that it had not been demonstrated that the worker's disability was due to 
the workplace stress. The minority viewed the evidence differently and also questioned whether 
the majority had changed the standard of proof required to establish a claim. 

5. Time Problems 

The Tribunal has also dealt with the difficulties posed by the absence of limitation periods and 
the effect of changes in statutory language. Decision No. 483/88 (Nov. 18/88) coped with the 
difficulties posed by a fatal accident which was not fully investigated when it occurred in 1927, 
and found that an orphan who had never known her father, was entitled to compensation. And 
Decision No. 765 (Oct. 3/88) analyzed the legal complexities of a statutory amendment affecting a 
claimant's status and whether the amendment should apply retroactively or retrospectively. 

Decision 915A, reviewed the common law of retroactivity and its effect on overrulings of 
previously accepted medical and legal positions. 

6. Section 15, The Right to Sue 

The Tribunal also considered in many cases, the "flip-side" of a compensation claim -- the 
removal of the right to sue. Decision Nos. 490/881 (Aug. 2/88) and 485/88 (Oct.28/88) have 
considered the statutory definitions of "dependants" and "members of family" and reviewed the 
question of whether a person's rights could be removed even though he or she was not entitled to 
receive compensation benefits. 

The effect of the Act on other possible causes of action, such as claims for products' liability, 
occupiers' liability, breach of contract and property damage, has been considered in several cases, 
including Decision Nos. 432/88 (Oct. 5/88), 965/871 (May 20/88), 1266/87 (May 1 1/88), 503/87 
(May 16/88), 259/88 (June 22/88) and others. 



24 



7. Others 

The Tribunal has also been concerned during the reporting period with the compensability of on- 
the-job heart attacks; with further development of its understanding of the concept of "arising 
out of and in the course of employment" in various situations; with the difficulty of 
distinguishing chronic-pain from psychological cases; with the difficulties of cases involivng in- 
resident workers; with the ongoing problems of parking lot cases; etc. 



L. FINANCIAL MATTERS 

1. The Finance and Administration Committee 

The Finance and Administration Committee is a tripartite standing committee of the Tribunal 
currently chaired by an employer member. It serves as the Tribunal's watchdog on fiscal matters. 
The work of the Finance & Administration Committee during 1988 was largely directed towards 
overseeing the control of the 1988/89 budget, converting the Tribunal's fiscal period to a 
calendar-year fiscal period effective January 1, 1989, and developing the 1989 budget. 

Details of the 1988/89 Budget, adjusted to nine months, are provided in Appendix F. 

2. 1989 Budget Preparation 

The preparation of the 1989 budget involved an extended budget review exercise, whereby 
department budget submissions were extensively studied by the Finance and Administration 
Committee on a detailed line-by-line basis. The resulting draft budget was then subjected to a 
solid week of close review by a super-committee consisting of the Tribunal Chairman, Alternate 
Chair, General Manager, Department Heads, members of the Finance and Administration and 
Executive Committees, and the chairs of all standing committees. In September 1988, the final 
budget was submitted to the Minister of Labour for approval. 

Despite a determined effort to hold the increase to four per cent, an increase of 4.6 per cent 
proved necessary: Total operating expenditures of $8.76 million compared to $8.38 million for 
the 88/89 budget. The Minister approved the budget as submitted. 

3. Audits 

The Tribunal has been advised that the Ministry of Labour's internal audit staff is preparing a 
management audit of the Appeals Tribunal in 1989. 

During 1988, pursuant to arrangements with the Provincial Auditor's Office under the terms of 
the Memorandum of Understanding, the firm of Touche Ross conducted an audit of the 1987/88 
expenditures. The same firm will audit the nine-month calendar year ending December 31, 1988. 
These audit reports are not available at the time of publishing and will be presented in future 
reports. 

4. Financial Statements for April 1, 1987, to March 30, 1988, 
and for April 1, 1988, to December 31, 1988 

These financial statements appear as Appendix F. 



25 



WORKERS' COMPENSATION APPEALS TRIBUNAL 
THIRD REPORT 

APPENDIX A 
STATEMENT OF MISSION, GOALS AND COMMITMENTS 



APPENDIX A 



STATEMENT OF MISSION, GOALS AND COMMITMENTS 

THE MISSION 

In its most fundamental terms, the Tribunal's mission is to perform appropriately the duties 
assigned to it by the Workers' Compensation Act. 

These duties are both explicit and implicit. The explicit assignments define what the Tribunal 
must do and are, generally speaking, clear. They need not be repeated here. 

The implicit obligations identify the manner of the Tribunal's operations. By definition, the 
nature of those obligations is subject to interpretation and debate, and it is important that the 
Tribunal's perceptions in that respect be known. 

The implicit statutory obligations as the Tribunal understands them may be usefully described in 
the following terms. 

1. The Tribunal must be competent, unbiased and fair-minded. 

2. The Tribunal must be independent. 

The obligation to be independent has three essential facets: 

(a) The maintenance of an arms-length, independent relationship with the Workers' 
Compensation Board. 

(b) A commitment by the chairman, vice-chairs and members to not being inappropriately 
influenced by the popular views of workers or employers. 

(c) A commitment by the chairman, vice-chairs and members to being undeterred by the 
possibility of government disapproval. 

3. The Tribunal must utilize an appropriate adjudication process. To be appropriate, the 
Tribunal believes the process must generally conform with the following basic concepts: 

(a) The process must be recognized as not being an "adversarial" process as that concept is 
generally understood in a common-law context. 

(Unlike a court, the Tribunal is not engaged in resolving a contest between private parties. 
Appeals to the Tribunal represent a stage in the workers' compensation system's investigation of 
the statutory rights and benefits flowing from an industrial injury. 

It is a stage of the system's process that is invoked on the initiative of a worker or employer but 
in this stage, as in earlier stages of the process, it is the system and not the worker or the 



APPENDIX A 



employer which has the burden of establishing what the Act does or does not provide with 
respect to any reported accident. 

The fact that it is the system which has the primary responsibility in this respect is reflected in 
the Board's and the Tribunal's explicit investigative mandates and their respective statutory 
obligations to decide cases on the basis of their "real merits and justice". 

In legal terminology the process may be characterized as an "inquisitorial" as opposed to an 
"adversarial" process. 

Despite the non-adversarial or inquisitorial nature of the process, it is a fact that the Tribunal's 
hearings normally take much the same form as do hearings in a typical adversarial process. To 
the uninitiated, the use of what is essentially an adversarial hearing format is confusing as to the 
fundamental nature of the Tribunal's process. In fact, however, the adversarial format merely 
reflects the Tribunal's tacit recognition that the participation of the parties in that manner will 
meet expectations in that regard and will, as well, be usually both the most effective and the most 
satisfying way for parties to, in fact, contribute to the Tribunal's search for the real merits and 
justice. 

The Tribunal's commitment, in a non-adversarial process, to an essentially adversarial hearing 
format is also bolstered by its appreciation of the Canadian legal system's concept of what 
constitutes a "hearing". The legal system's understanding of the principles of natural justice that 
apply where there is, as there is here, a right to a hearing, are such that even in a non-adversarial 
process the style of hearing would not in law be allowed to stray far from the basic adversarial 
format.) 

(b) The non-adversarial nature of the process in which the Tribunal is engaged evokes the 
following three, particularly significant special process imperatives. 

(i) The Tribunal's hearing panels have a responsibility to take such steps as they may 
find necessary to satisfy themselves that in any particular case they have such 
reasonably available evidence as they require to be confident as to the actual merits 
and justice in that case. 

(ii) The issue agenda in any case must ultimately be determined by the hearing 
panels and not dictated by the parties. 

(iii) The manner of conducting a hearing, while usually to be governed by rules and 
format of a standard nature, must be adaptable to the special hearing needs of 
any particular case as the hearing panel in that case may consider necessary or 
appropriate. Any such adaptations must, however, be consistent with a fair 
hearing and reflect proper regard for the integrity of general Tribunal rules and 
procedures that are conducive to effective and fair process from an overall 
perspective. 

(c) The adjudication process must be effective and fair from the parties' perspective. 

It must allow the parties timely knowledge of the issues, a fair opportunity to challenge or 
add to evidence and/or to provide their own evidence, and a fair opportunity to advocate 
their views and to argue against opposing views. 



APPENDIX A 

(d) The process must also be effective from the perspective of the Tribunal. 

It must provide the Tribunal's panels with the evidence, the means of evaluating the 
evidence, and the understanding of the issues, which will permit them to decide with 
confidence on the real merits and justice of the case. 

(e) The process should not be more complicated, regulated, or formal (and, thus, not more 
intimidating to lay participants) than the requirements of effectiveness and fairness and the 
needs of reasonable efficiency dictate. 

(f) In the post-hearing phase, the decision-making process must provide full opportunity for 
effective tripartite decision-making and for the careful development of appropriate 
decisions. 

To be appropriate, decisions must be written and fully-reasoned. They must conform to the rule 
of law and meet reasonable, general standards of decision quality. Applicable law must be given 
its due effect and the principles adopted in other Appeals Tribunal decisions must be shown 
appropriate deference. The goal of achieving like results in like fact situations must be sensibly 
pursued. 

4. The process for dealing with applications, as distinguished from appeals, while conforming 
generally with the foregoing, must be subject to such variations as the special statutory provisions 
governing each of the various applications may anticipate. 

5. The Tribunal must hold hearings and reach decisions in as timely a fashion as is reasonably 
possible given the foregoing process obligations. 

6. The Tribunal must make all its decisions readily accessible to the public. 

7. The Tribunal's services must be reasonably accessible in both the French and English 
languages. 

GOALS 

In pursuing its mission, the Tribunal has adopted the following specific goals. 

1. Achieving a total case turnaround time from notice of appeal or application to final disposition 
that averages four months, and in individual cases, unless they are of unusual complexity or 
difficulty, does not exceed six months. 

2. Providing a system which can, so far as is reasonably possible, meet the various implicit 
statutory imperatives regardless of the experience or capabilities in a particular case of the 
worker's or employer's representative, or the absence from the process of any party or 
representative. 

3. Maintaining at all points of contact between the Tribunal and workers and employers and their 
representatives a welcoming, empathetic, non-intimidating and constructive professional 
environment -- an environment grounded in implicit respect on the part of all Tribunal staff and 
members for the goals and motives of workers and employers involved in the Tribunal's processes 
and for the importance of the Tribunal's work on their behalf. 



Ill 



APPENDIX A 



4. Maintaining a working environment for Tribunal staff that provides both challenging work 
and suitable opportunities for personal recognition, development and advancement, in an 
atmosphere of mutual respect. 

5. Maintaining at all times a sufficient complement of qualified, competent, trained and 
committed vice-chairs and members. 

6. Maintaining at all times a sufficient roster of qualified and committed medical assessors. 

7. Maintaining at all times a sufficient complement of qualified, competent, trained and 
committed administrative and professional staff. 

8. Providing the physical facilities, equipment and administrative support services necessary for 
the vice-chairs, members and staff to perform their responsibilities efficiently and in a manner 
which is conducive to job satisfaction and consistent with professional expectations. 

9. Within such restrictions as may be implicit in the chairman's statutory obligation to take as his 
or her guidelines in the establishment of job classifications, salaries and benefits the 
administrative policies of the Government, compensating staff fairly and competitively relative to 
their responsibilities and the nature of their work. 

10. Maintaining a constructive and appropriate working relationship with the medical profession 
and its members, generally, and with the Tribunal's medical assessors, in particular. 

11. Maintaining a constructive and appropriate working relationship with the Board and its staff 
and with the Board's board of directors. 

12. Maintaining a constructive and appropriate working relationship with the Minister and 
Ministry of Labour and with such other components of the government structure with which the 
Tribunal has dealings from time to time. 

13. Providing the public and, in particular, workers and employers and their respective 
communities and representatives with such information about the Appeals Tribunal and its 
operations as is necessary for the effective utilization of the Tribunal's services. 

COMMITMENTS 

In the performance of the Tribunal's Mission and in the pursuit of its Goals, the Tribunal has 
recognized a number of matters to which it is effectively committed. 

1. The Tribunal is committed to keeping the investigative and pre-hearing preparation activities 
of the Tribunal separate from its decision-making activities. 

This is accomplished by means of a permanent department of full-time professional staff referred 
to as the Tribunal Counsel Office (the TCO). TCO's assignment in this regard is to perform the 
Tribunal's investigative and pre-hearing preparation work. This work is to be performed in 
accordance with general standing instructions of the Tribunal. In individual cases where pre-- 
hearing investigation or preparation requirements appear to exceed such standing instructions, 
TCO will act in accordance with special instructions from Tribunal panels -- panels whose 
members are not thereafter permitted to participate in the hearing and deciding of such cases. 



IV 



APPENDIX A 



2. The Tribunal is committed to Tribunal-monitoring, at the pre-hearing stage, of the 
identification of issues and the sufficiency of evidence. 

As part of the commitment to separation of pre-hearing investigation and preparation activity 
from decision-making activity, this monitoring is normally carried out by the TCO pursuant to 
Tribunal instructions delivered in the manner described above. 

(This commitment does not preclude variable strategies concerning the degree of pre-hearing 
monitoring and the amount of TCO initiative in the pre-hearing preparation, with respect to 
different categories of cases. It also contemplates the possibility of TCO not monitoring 
particular categories of uncomplicated cases.) 

It is, of course, understood that the TCO's pre-hearing role does not diminish in any way the 
hearing panels' intrinsic rights and obligations in the hearing and determining of individual cases. 
Hearing panels have the final say in the identification of issues and, at a mid-hearing or 
post-hearing phase, the right to initiate and supervise the development or search for additional 
evidence, or to obtain further legal research or request additional submissions. 

3. The Tribunal is committed to having the Tribunal represented by its own counsel at any 
Tribunal hearing where the Tribunal considers such representation necessary or useful. 

4. In its internal decision-making processes, the Tribunal is committed to the maintenance of a 
tri-partite working environment characterized by mutual respect and by free and frank 
discussions based on non-partisan, personal best judgements from all panel members. 

5. The Tribunal is committed to maintaining internal educational processes suitable for 
developing a Tribunal-wide, comprehensive appreciation of the nature and dimensions of 
emerging, generic, medical, legal or procedural issues. 

6. The Tribunal is committed to the establishment and maintenance of a general workers' 
compensation information resource and library. 

This resource and library is to be a sufficient and effective source of legal, medical, and factual 
information relevant to the workers' compensation subject. It shall provide access to information 
which is not conveniently assembled elsewhere, and which workers and employers, members of 
the public, professional representatives, and Members and staff of the Tribunal require if they 
are to truly understand the workers' compensation system and the issues which it presents, or be 
able to prepare on a fully informed basis for presenting or dealing with such issues in individual 
cases. 

This information is to be readily accessible through electronic and other means. 

7. The Tribunal is committed to the creation of a permanent, widely distributed and easily 
accessible, published record of the Tribunal's work. 

This record is to consist of the selection of Tribunal decisions best calculated to assist worker or 
employer representatives to understand, in the preparation of their cases, workers' compensation 
issues and the Tribunal's developing position on such issues. 



APPENDIX A 



8. The Tribunal is committed to the review by the Chairman, or by the Office of the Counsel to 
the Chairman, of draft panel decisions. 

This review is conducted for the purpose of ensuring - to the extent possible given the 
overriding hearing-panel autonomy - that the Tribunal's body of decisions complies reasonably 
with the general hallmarks of quality which the Tribunal has recognized. 

9. The Tribunal is committed to devoting its best efforts to having Tribunal decisions comply 
reasonably with the following hallmarks of a good-quality adjudicative decision: 

(a) It does not ignore or overlook relevant issues fairly raised by the facts. 

(b) It makes the evidence base for the panel's decisions clear. 

(c) On issues of law or on generic medical issues, it does not conflict with previous Tribunal 
decisions unless the conflict is explicitly identified and the reasons for the disagreement 
with the previous decision or decisions are specified. 

(d) It makes the panel's reasoning clear and understandable. 

(e) It meets reasonable standards of readability. 

(f) It conforms reasonably with Tribunal standard decision formats. 

(g) From decision to decision the technical and legal terminology is consistent. 

(h) It contributes appropriately to a body of decisions which must be, as far as possible, 
internally coherent. 

(i) It does not support permanent conflicting positions on clear issues of law or medicine. Such 
conflicts may occur during periods of development on contentious issues. They cannot be a 
permanent feature of the Tribunal's body of decisions over the long term. 

(j) It conforms with applicable statutory and common law and appropriately reflects the 
Tribunal's commitment to the rule of law. 

(k) It forms a useful part of a body of decisions which must be a reasonably accessible and 
helpful resource for understanding and preparing to deal with the issues in new cases and 
for invoking effectively the important principle that like cases should receive like treatment. 

10. The Tribunal is committed to obtaining in each case such reasonably available evidence as its 
hearing panels require if they are to be confident as to the appropriateness of their decision on 
any factual or medical issue. 

11. The Tribunal is committed to holding hearings at appropriate out-of-Toronto locations. 

The commitment in this respect is that cases originating out of Toronto should be heard at 
locations which are reasonably convenient from both the worker's and employer's perspective. 
This commitment is subject to the limit of not imposing travel obligations on Tribunal members 
or administrative burdens on the Tribunal so onerous as to interfere with the effective operation 
of the Tribunal in other respects. 



VI 



APPENDIX A 



12. The Tribunal is committed to the payment of expenses and compensation in respect of lost 
wages arising from attendance at Tribunal hearings in accordance with the WCB's policies in that 
regard with respect to attendance at WCB proceedings. 

13. The Tribunal is committed to paying for medical reports which serve a reasonable purpose in 
the Tribunal's proceedings. 

14. The Tribunal is committed to being fiscally responsible in the management of its expenditures 
to the end that only moneys necessary for the performance of the Tribunal's mission and the 
accomplishment of the Tribunal's goals are, in fact, spent. 

This document reflects the Tribunal's Mission, Goals and Commitments as at least implicitly 
understood from the Tribunal's inception.^ Their expression in these particular terms was 
approved by the Tribunal as of October 1, 1988. 



^ The single exception is Goal No. 1. The original turnaround goal was six months. 



VII 



WORKERS' COMPENSATION APPEALS TRIBUNAL 
THIRD REPORT 

APPENDIX B 

TRIBUNAL MEMBERS ACTIVE DURING 

THE REPORTING PERIOD 



APPENDIX B 



THE MEMBERS OF THE TRIBUNAL 

Chairman 



S. Ronald Ellis 



Mr. Ellis is the Tribunal's first chairman. He assumed office on October 1, 1985. He was 
re-appointed for a three-year term effective October 1, 1988. Mr. Ellis, who trained and 
practised as an engineer before going to law school, was formerly a partner in the Toronto law 
firm of Osier, Hoskin & Harcourt. More recently, he was a faculty member at Osgoode Hall Law 
School where he was Director and then Faculty Director of Parkdale Community Legal Services. 
He came to the Tribunal from his position as Director of Education and Head of the Bar 
Admission Course for the Law Society of Upper Canada. In addition, Mr. Ellis has significant 
experience as a labour arbitrator. 



Alternate Chairman 

Laura Bradbury 

Ms. Bradbury was appointed to the Tribunal effective October 1, 1985, and was re-appointed for 
a one-year term effective October 1, 1988. Her re-appointment for only one year reflects the 
Tribunal's "stagger policy". She is expected to be re-appointed for a further three-year period 
effective October 1, 1989. Called to the Bar in 1979, she acted as counsel for injured workers 
and, for the two years prior to her appointment, was an investigator with the Office of the 
Ombudsman. The position of alternate chairman is not one that is defined by the Tribunal's 
legislation. It is a management position created by the chairman as a means of sharing the 
administrative and management load that devolves on the Chairman's Office. The title was 
chosen to reflect the senior nature of the position and the fact that the incumbent is also the 
vice-chairman appointed by the chairman -- pursuant to provisions in the legislation in that 
respect -- to act in place of the chairman in the event of the chairman's absence from the 
Province or his inability to act. The alternate chairman, like the chairman, has both a 
management and an adjudicative role. 



Vlll 



APPENDIX B 



Full-Time Vice-Chairmen 



Jean Guy Bigras 

Mr. Bigras who was first appointed to the Tribunal as a part-time vice-chair on May 14, 1986, 
was granted a full-time appointment effective December 17, 1987. He is a former journalist and 
civil servant. During his 20 years as a journalist for North Bay and Ottawa dailies, he had 
extensive experience in labour and judicial affairs. As an Ontario Government public servant, 
he had the experience of co-ordinating a Ministry of Health task force. 

Nicolette Carlan (Catton) 

Ms. Carlan was appointed to the Tribunal effective October 1, 1985 and was reappointed for a 
further two year term effective October 1, 1988. A graduate in sociology, she was with the 
Office of the Ombudsman for nine years prior to her appointment. From 1978 to 1985, she was 
in charge of the Ombudsman's Workers' Compensation Directorate. 

Maureen Kenny 

Ms. Kenny was appointed to the Tribunal effective July 30, 1987. She was called to the Bar of 
Ontario in 1979. Following a period of private practice, Ms. Kenny joined the (Ontario) Ministry 
of Labour as a policy analyst. She came to the Tribunal originally in October 1985, in the 
position of Counsel to the Chairman. 

Faye W. Mclntosh-Janis 

Ms. McIntosh-Janis was appointed to the Tribunal effective May 14, 1986. She was called to the 
Bar of Ontario in 1978, and was a full-time member of the Research Department at Osier, 
Hoskin & Harcourt for six years. She came to the Tribunal from the position of Senior Solicitor 
with the Ontario Labour Relations Board. 



John Paul Moore 

Mr. Moore was appointed to the Tribunal as a part-time vice-chairman on July 16, 1986, and was 
appointed as a full-time vice-chairman effective May 1, 1988, for a three-year term. Called to 
the Bar in 1978, Mr. Moore was previously a staff lawyer with the Kinna-Aweya legal clinic in 
Thunder Bay, and a staff lawyer with Downtown Legal Services on a part-time basis, dealing 
with various administrative tribunals. 

Zeynep Onen 

Ms Onen was appointed to the Tribunal effective October 1, 1988, for a three-year term. Called 
to the Bar of Ontario in 1982, Ms. Onen was with the Office of the Ombudsman for three years. 
Ms. Onen joined the Tribunal in October 1985, and was Senior Counsel in the Tribunal Counsel 
Office from 1986-1988. 



IX 



APPENDIX B 

Antonio Signoroni 

Mr. Signoroni was appointed to the Tribunal effective October 1, 1985, and was re-appointed for 
another three-year term effective October 1, 1988. A practising lawyer since 1982, Mr. Signoroni 
had ten years experience as a part-time chairman to the Board of Referees of the Unemployment 
Insurance Commission. Before entering the legal profession he was involved extensively with 
service to the Italian community. He was a trustee on the Metro Separate School Board from 
1980 to 1982. 

David Starkman 

Mr. Starkman was appointed to the Tribunal effective August 1, 1988, for a three-year term. 
He was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1980, and practised law at Golden, Green & Starkman. 
Mr. Starkman joined the Tribunal in 1985 as the first Tribunal General Counsel. 

I. J. Strachan 

Mr. Strachan was appointed to the Tribunal effective October 1, 1985, and was re-appointed for 
further two and a half-year term effective October 1, 1988. Called to the Bar in 1971, 
Mr. Strachan's law practice involved advising small businesses with respect to a variety of 
commercial matters and employee-related issues. He has also served as a director of the Canadian 
Organization of Small Business. 

Members Representative of Employers and Workers: Fuli-Time 

Robert Apsey 

Mr. Apsey was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of employers effective 
December 11, 1985, and was re-appointed for another three-year term effective December 11, 
1988. He held a number of responsible positions at Reed Stenhouse during his 25 years with that 
firm until his early retirement in 1983, as a vice-chairman of the Board and Senior 
Vice-President. 

Brian Cook 

Mr. Cook was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective October 
1, 1985, and was re-appointed for a further one-year term on October 1, 1988. His 
re-appointment for only one year reflects the Tribunal's "stagger policy". He is expected to be 
re-appointed for a further three-year period efective October 1, 1989. A graduate of the 
University of Toronto, Mr. Cook was a community legal worker with the Industrial Accident 
Victims Group of Ontario for five years. 

Sam Fox 

Mr. Fox was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective 
October 1, 1985, and was re-appointed for a further two-year term effective October 1, 1988. 



APPENDIX B 

A past president of the Labour Council of Metropolitan Toronto, Mr. Fox is a former 
Co-Director and International Vice-President of Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers 
Union. 

Karen Guillemette 

Ms. Guillemette was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of employers effective 
July 2, 1986. Ms. Guillemette was the Administrator of Occupational Health at Kidd Creek 
Mines Limited in Timmins, and had been an active member of the Ontario Mining Association. 
Prior to her position as Administrator, she was the Industrial Nurse at Kidd Creek Mines. 

Lome Heard 

Mr. Heard was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective 
October 1, 1985, and was re-appointed for a further three-year term effective October 1, 1988. 
With more than 30 years of experience in workers' compensation matters, Mr. Heard came to the 
Tribunal from a 13-year career with the United Steelworkers of America where he had national 
responsibility for occupational health and safety, and workers' compensation. 

W. Douglas Jago 

Mr. Jago was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of employers effective 
October 1, 1985, and was re-appointed for a further two-year term effective October 1, 1988. 
Mr. Jago had been Managing Director of Brantford Mechanical Ltd., and President and principal 
owner of W.D. Jago Ltd., both mechanical contracting concerns. He was an active member of the 
Mechanical Contractor's Association. 

Raymond Lebert 

Mr. Lebert was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective June 
1, 1988. Prior to joining the Tribunal Mr. Lebert was the Financial Secretary-Treasurer of Local 
444 of the Canadian Auto Workers. 



Nick McCombie 

Mr. McCombie was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective 
October 1, 1985, and was re-appointed for a further three-year term effective October 1, 1988. 
His move to the Tribunal followed seven years' service as a legal worker at the Injured Workers' 
Consultants legal clinic in Toronto. 

Martin Meslin 

Mr. Meslin was appointed to the Tribunal as a part-time member representative of employers 
effective December 1 1, 1985, and appointed to a three-year, full-time term effective August 1, 
1988. He has over 30 years of experience in running his own business in the printing industry. 
He was a lay member of the Ontario Legal Aid Plan Appeals Committee, and a lay appointee to 
the governing Council of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario and a member of the 
Discipline Tribunal of the College. 

xi 



APPENDIX B 



Kenneth W. Preston 



Mr. Preston was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of employers effective 
October 1, 1985, and was re-appointed for a further two year term effective October 1, 1988. A 
graduate chemical engineer, Mr. Preston was Director of Employee Relations for Union Carbide 
for ten years and Vice-President of Human Resources for Kellogg Salada for three years. 

Maurice Robillard 

Mr. Robillard was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective 
March 11, 1987. Prior to his appointment, he was an international representative of the 
Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers' Union of America for 20 years with a wide range of 
experience including mediation of internal union problems, negotiating contracts, appearances 
before various provincial labour relations boards and advising workers of their rights under 
provincial labour laws. 

Jacques Seguin 

Mr. Seguin was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of employers effective 
July 1, 1986. Mr. Seguin was chairman of the Softwood Plywood Division of the Canadian 
Hardwood Plywood Association C.L.A. and Vice-President of CHPA from 1981 to 1983. He 
retired from Levesque Plywood Limited as General Manager in 1984. 



Xll 



APPENDIX B 



PART-TIME MEMBERS OF THE TRIBUNAL 
Part-Time Vice-Chairmen 



Arjun Aggarwal 



Dr. Aggarwal was appointed to the Tribunal effective May 14, 1986. He is currently the 
coordinator of labour management studies at Confederation College in Thunder Bay, Ontario. He 
has past experience as a labour lawyer, labour consultant, concilliator, fact-finder, referee, and is 
an approved arbitrator. 

Sandra Chapnik 

Appointed to the Tribunal effective March 11, 1987, Ms. Chapnik practices with the law firm of 
Leonard A. Banks and Associates. She has also served as a part-time Rent Review Commissioner 
and a Fact Finder for the Education Relations Commission. 

Gary Farb 

Mr. Farb was appointed to the Tribunal effective March 11, 1987. He is in private practice and 
was called to the Bar in 1978. He has a wide range of experience in administrative law, including 
two years as legal counsel in the Office of the Ombudsman. 

Marsha Faubert 

Ms. Faubert was appointed to the Tribunal effective December 10, 1987. She was called to the 
Bar of Ontario in 1981, and joined the Tribunal as a lawyer in the Tribunal Counsel Office in 
October 1985, following four years in private practice. 

Karl Friedmann 

Dr. Friedmann was appointed to the Tribunal effective December 17, 1987. He has a Ph.D. in 
political science and taught at the University of Calgary for 13 years. From 1979 to 1985, he was 
British Columbia's first Ombudsman. 

Ruth Hartman 

Ms. Hartman was appointed to the Tribunal effective December 11, 1985, and was re-appointed 
for a further three-year term effective December 11, 1988. She is currently in private practice 
with an emphasis on administrative appeals to provincial tribunals. She was previously counsel to 
the Ombudsman for five years. 

Joan Lax 

Ms Lax was appointed to the Tribunal effective May 14, 1986. Called to the Bar in 1978, she has 
practised with the law firm of Weir & Foulds, with emphasis on administrative and civil law. She 
is currently the Assistant Dean, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto. 



Xlll 



APPENDIX B 

Victor Marafioti 

Mr. Marafioti, appointed to the Tribunal effective March II, 1987, is currently the Director of 
Business Programs at Centennial College of Applied Arts and Technology. For approximately ten 
years, he was the Director of COSTI, a rehabilitation centre with extensive involvement with the 
Workers' Compensation Board. 

William Marcotte 

Mr. Marcotte was appointed to the Tribunal effective May 14, 1986. He is a mediator and is on 
the list of approved arbitrators with the Ministry of Labour. He teaches collective bargaining 
processes at the University of Western Ontario. 

Eva Marszewski 

Ms Marszewski was appointed to the Tribunal effective May 14, 1986. She was called to the Bar 
in 1976 and is, at present, in private practice with special emphasis on civil litigation, family law, 
municipal law and labour law. She is a past member of the Ontario Advisory Council on 
Women's Issues. 

Joy McGrath 

Ms McGrath was appointed to the Tribunal effective December 10, 1987. She was called to the 
Bar of Ontario in 1977, and is currently in private practice. Prior to attending law school, Ms 
McGrath had six years' experience as President and General Manager of a company specializing 
in commercial and residential development. 

Denise Reautne 

Appointed to the Tribunal effective March 11, 1987, Professor Reaume is a professor of law at 
the University of Toronto. She teaches administrative law and her past experience includes a 
research study entitled, "Compensation for Loss of Working Capacity" for the Ontario Law 
Reform Commission. 

Sophia Sperdakos 

Ms Sperdakos was appointed to the Tribunal effective May 14, 1986. She was called to the 
Ontario Bar in 1982 and is currently with the law firm of Dunbar, Sachs, Appeli. She was a 
chairperson and caseworker with the Community and Legal Aid Services programme at Osgoode 
Hall Law School. 



Susan Stewart 

Ms Stewart was appointed to the Tribunal effective May 14, 1986. Ms Stewart articled with the 
Ontario Labour Relations Board and was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1981. She is currently on 
the Ministry of Labour's list of approved arbitrators. 



xiv 



APPENDIX B 
Gerald Swartz 

Mr. Swartz, appointed to the Tribunal effective March 11, 1987, was, at one time, Director of 
Research for the Ministry of Labour. He is now the President of Canadian Loric Consultants 
Ltd. He has experience in human resources management, negotiating collective agreements, 
arbitrations, and workers' compensation and employment standards assessments. 

Paul Torrie 

Mr. Torrie was appointed to the Tribunal effective May 14, 1986. He is currently a partner in 
the law firm of Torrie, Simpson, practising in a wide range of litigation, administrative and 
corporate law. Mr. Torrie's additional work experience includes community legal work with the 
Osgoode Hall Community Legal Aid Services programme. 

Peter Warrian 

Mr. Warrian was appointed to the Tribunal effective May 14, 1986, and has extensive labour 
relations experience through his involvement with the Ontario Public Service Employees Union. 
He currently carries on a consulting business with government and union clientele and has written 
extensively in the labour relations field. 

Chris Wydrzynski 

Professor Wydrzynski was appointed to the Tribunal effective March 11, 1987. He is a Professor 
of law at the University of Windsor (since 1975) and was called to the Bar in 1982. He teaches 
administrative law and has acted as a referee, analyst, consultant, research evaluator and panelist. 

Members Representative of Employers and Workers: Part-Time 

Shelley Acheson 

Ms Acheson was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective 
December 11, 1985, and was re-appointed for a further three-year term effective December 1 1, 
1988. She was the Human Rights Director of the Ontario Federation of Labour from 1975 to 
1984. 

Dave Beattie 

Mr. Beattie was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective 
December 11, 1985, and was re-appointed for a further three-year term effective December 1 1, 
1988. He has 20 years of WCB experience representing injured workers or disabled firefighters 
in Appeals Adjudicator and Appeal Board hearings. 



XV 



APPENDIX B 

Frank Byrnes 

Mr. Byrnes was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective 

May 14, 1986. He was formerly a police officer and has been a member of the Joint Consultative 

Committee on Workers' Compensation Board matters. 

Herbert Clappison 

Mr. Clappison was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of employers effective 
May 14, 1986. Mr. Clappison retired from Bell Canada in 1982 after 37 years of employment 
with that company. Upon retirement, he was Director of Labour Relations and Employment. 

George Drennan 

Mr. Drennan was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective 
December 11, 1985. He was re-appointed for a three-year term effective December 11, 1988. 
He has been the Grand Lodge Representative for the International Association of Machinists and 
Aerospace Workers since 1971. 

Douglas Felice 

Mr. Felice was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective 
May 14, 1986, and is currently with the Canadian Paper Workers Union, 

Mary Ferrari 

Ms Ferrari was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective 
May 14, 1986. Her previous experience includes legal worker with the Industrial Accident 
Victims Group of Ontario. 

Patti Fuhrman 

Ms Fuhrman was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective 
May 14, 1986. She was a caseworker at the Advocacy Resource Centre for the Handicapped and, 
more recently, was a worker with Employment and Immigration Canada. 

Mark Cabinet 

Mr. Cabinet was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of employers effective 
December 17, 1987. He is currently the Health and Safety Administrator for the City of 
Brampton, a position he has held since 1984. Prior to that time he worked as a research 
consultant with the Industrial Accident Prevention Association. 

Roy Higson 

Mr. Higson was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective 
December 11, 1985, and was re-appointed for a further three-year term effective December 11, 

xvi 



APPENDIX B 

1988. He recently retired from the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union. He was the 
international representative of Local 414 for nine years and has 29 years of union experience. 

Faith Jackson 

Ms Jackson was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective 
December 11, 1985. She was re-appointed for a futher three-year term effective December 1 1, 
1988. A Nurses' Aid at Guildwood Villa Nursing Home from 1972 to 1985, Ms Jackson was a 
member of the Executive Board of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) for six 
years. 

Donna Jewell 

A resident of London, Ms Jewell was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of 
employers effective December 11, 1985. She was re-appointed for a futher three-year term 
effective December 11, 1988. She has been the assistant safety director of Ellis-Don Ltd. for 
approximately seven years. She managed the Ellis-Don WCB claims management and safety 
programs. 

Peter Klym 

Mr. Klym was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective 
May 14, 1986. He is currently employed with the Communication Workers of Canada. 

Teresa Kowalishin 

Ms Kowalishin was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of employers effective 
May 14, 1986. She has been employed as a lawyer with the City of Toronto since her call to the 
Bar in 1979. 



Frances L. Lankin 

Ms Lankin was originally appointed to the Tribunal as a full-time member representative of 
workers effective December 11, 1985. For five years prior to her appointment, she was the 
Research/Education Officer for the Ontario Public Service Employees Union. She was also that 
union's equal opportunities coordinator. On February 25, 1988, Ms Lankin's full-time 
appointment was modified to a part-time status so that she could accept employment with 
OPSEU. 



Allen S. Merritt 

Mr. Merritt was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of employers effective 
June 23, 1988. He is currently a labour relations consultant with his own consulting firm. Mr. 
Merritt retired from a career in education in 1985. At that time he was Superintendent of 
Employee Relations for the Metropolitan Toronto School Board and Chief Negotiator for all 
Baords of Education in Metropolitan Toronto. 



XVll 



APPENDIX B 

Gerry M. Nipshagen 

Mr. Nipshagen was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of Employers effective 
October 1, 1988. He has extensive management experience in both the manufacturing and 
agricultural areas. From 1980 to 1988, he was Occupational Health and Safety Mangeer for 
Leaver Mushrooms, where he was responsible for workers' compensation and health and safety 
matters. 

Fortunato (Lucky) Rao 

Mr. Rao was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of workers effective February 
11, 1988. Mr. Rao was formerly a union representative with the United Steelworkers of America 
and for 14 years has hosted a cable "labour news" programme. 

John Ronson 

Mr. Ronson was appointed to the Tribunal as a member representative of employers effective 
December 11, 1985, and was re-appointed for a further three-year term on December 11, 1988. 
He has an extensive background in personnel development at Stelco. 

Sara Sutherland 

Ms Sutherland was appointed to the Tribunal effective December 17, 1987. She is currently 
Supervisor, Corporate External Liaison Services, in the Health and Safety Division of Ontario 
Hydro. 

Members Who Resigned or Whose Appointments Expired 
During the Reporting Period 



Donald Grenville 

Tribunal member representative of Employers (part-time) 

John Magwood 
Vice-Chair (part-time) 

David C. Mason 

Tribunal member representative of employers (full-time) 



XVlll 



APPENDIX B 



Elaine Newman 



Vice-Chair (full-time) 

Currently Tribunal General Counsel 



Kathleen O'Nell 

Vice-Chair (full-time) 

James R. Thomas 

Alternate Chair 



XIX 



WORKERS' COMPENSATION APPEALS TRIBUNAL 
THIRD REPORT 

APPENDIX C 

DETAILS OF THE DEVELOPING RELATIONSHIP 

WITH THE BOARD 

Schedule 1: Practice Direction No. 9 



APPENDIX C 
DETAILS OF THE DEVELOPING RELATIONSHIP WITH THE BOARD 

1. Chronic Pain and Retroactivity 

The compensability of what Tribunal Decision No. 915 (May 26/87) defined as "enigmatic chronic 
pain" and "psychogenic pain magnification", and what has come to be referred to generically as 
"chronic pain", continues to be a developing subject both at the WCB and the Appeals Tribunal. 
It has also been a particular focus of the evolving relationship between the two organizations. 

Shortly after Decision No. 915's recognition of the compensability of chronic pain in principle, 
the WCB board of directors approved the WCB's own policy for compensating what it referred to 
as "chronic pain disorders". At the same time, the WCB board of directors accepted the WCB 
staff's recommendation that the board of directors not exercise its section 86n review powers with 
respect to Decision No. 915. 

The decision not to review Decision No. 915 was taken explicitly without prejudice to the board 
of directors' right to review the decision at a later stage, but the impression that was left, 
certainly with the Appeals Tribunal, was that the board did not consider the 915 decision to be in 
substantial conflict with the chronic-pain disorder policy which it had just approved. Much 
later, it eventually became clear that, at least as far as the WCB's staff was concerned, this was 
only partly right. 

The policy, as it came to be applied by the WCB's staff, in effect compensates disabilities 
attributable to enigmatic chronic pain. It does not, however, in fact allow for compensation of 
chronic pain in the nature of psychogenic magnification of pain associated with a residual organic 
problem. It compensates only chronic-pain cases which are predominantly non-organic in nature 
(which is how it categorizes enigmatic, chronic-pain cases) and considers pain magnification cases 
to be predominantly organic. Cases in the latter category continue to be compensated under the 
old policy. That policy provides that, in determining the compensable degree of a permanent 
disability any psychogenic, pain-magnification element is to be isolated and ignored. 

Thus in due course it became clear that the WCB policy, at least as it was applied, was in a major 
respect in conflict with Decision No. 915. In its essential respects Decision No. 915 is a case of 
pain magnification and in that decision the Appeals Tribunal had concluded that the psychogenic, 
pain-magnification element of the worker's disability as well as the organic element was 
compensable. The board of directors' decision to not review Decision No. 915 obscured this 
essential conflict for a period of time. The Tribunal's subsequent treatment of permanent 
pension chronic-pain appeals, which is described below, was, during a critical period, influenced 
to some extent by this misunderstanding of the WCB's position. 

Once the WCB's own chronic-pain policy was in place, a discussion then took place between the 
WCB's staff and the Appeals Tribunal concerning the appropriate treatment of the chronic pain 
cases which at the time the WCB's policy was approved were already on appeal to the Tribunal 
but not heard or decided. This discussion and its effect on the processing of the large number of 
cases which had been put on hold by the Tribunal pending the release of Decision No. 915 is 
alluded to in the Second Report. At page 5 of that report it is mentioned that as of the end of 
that report's reporting period the processing of the appeals in these cases was undergoing a 
further short delay while the Tribunal and the WCB "worked out their appropriate respective 
roles in these cases in the light of the WCB's subsequent adoption of its own new policy on 
chronic pain." 

The problem was as follows. The WCB's staff felt that the WCB should now review in the light 
of its new chronic-pain disorder policy all of the cases of a chronic-pain nature which had been 

XX 



APPENDIX C 

appealed to the Tribunal but not heard or decided at the time the WCB's policy issued. It was of 
the view that the WCB's introduction of this new policy had removed the Tribunal's jurisdiction 
to deal with these cases until after the WCB had considered how its new policy applied. 

Under the Act, the Tribunal's jurisdiction arises only with respect to final decisions in which the 
WCB's procedures have been exhausted (Section 86g(2)). The WCB's staff argued that the WCB's 
adoption of a policy for compensating certain cases of a chronic-pain nature meant that cases of 
that kind now presented issues in respect of which the WCB's procedures could not any longer be 
said to have been exhausted -- even though they had been appealed before the new policy issued. 
The WCB's staff advised the Tribunal that even if the Tribunal went ahead with the appeals in 
those cases and issued decisions, the WCB would feel obliged to continue with its own review of 
such cases and issue its own decisions. 

The policy consideration which appeared to be motivating this view was the need the WCB felt to 
be the one which first applied its new policy to actual cases. (The WCB did not, of course, 
dispute the Tribunal's right to consider these cases ultimately when and if the WCB's decision in 
applying its new policy was appealed.) 

The discussions concerning this issue were carried on between the Tribunal's General Counsel 
and the WCB's General Counsel. 

The WCB staff's position in this respect lead the Appeals Tribunal to undertake a particularly 
careful review of its jurisdiction and of the appropriate relationship between it and the WCB. 
After intensive internal discussions, the Tribunal ultimately concluded that while it did not 
concede any lack of jurisdiction with respect to these cases, it did have the power to refer such 
cases back to the WCB for initial application of the new chronic pain policy and that in all the 
circumstances it would generally be appropriate to do so. 

In order that this decision not lead in the worker or employer communities to any 
misunderstanding of the Tribunal's view with respect to its role and its relations to the WCB, the 
Tribunal issued a Practice Direction in which it set out full reasons for its decision to refer these 
cases back to the WCB. Practice Direction No. 9 was issued October 23, 1987. It is of particular 
general interest for the strong light it throws on the Tribunal's view of its role in the 
compensation system and its appropriate relationship with the WCB. A copy may be found 
attached as Schedule I to this Appendix. 

In the controversy that was resolved by Practice Direction No. 9, the focus had been entirely on 
the permanent pension cases involving chronic-pain conditions. Decision No. 915 had been a 
permanent pension case. The cases which were on hold pending the release of Decision No. 915 
had all been permanent pension cases, and it was not at that time clear to the Tribunal that the 
WCB's chronic-pain policy encompassed temporary benefits as well as permanent pensions. 
Practice Direction No. 9 dealt only with pending permanent pension appeals. 

However, after Practice Direction No. 9 issued it soon became apparent that the WCB's staff felt 
that the WCB's new policy encompassed temporary as well as permanent benefits and that, in 
particular, the limit on the retroactivity of chronic-pain benefits should apply to temporary 
benefits as it did to permanent benefits. The WCB's new policy had provided that no benefits 
with respect to chronic-pain disabilities should be payable for any period prior to July 3, 1987 -- 
the date on which the new policy was approved by the board of directors. In deciding to refer 
the permanent-pension, chronic-pain appeal cases back to the WCB, one of the factors 
influencing the Tribunal had been the fact that up to that time the only decision the Tribunal had 
issued in a permanent-pension appeal had been Decision No. 915. And, as previously mentioned, 



XXI 



APPENDIX C 

at that time it was the Tribunal's understanding that Decision No. 915 was a decision which the 
board of directors regarded as, generally speaking, consistent with the WCB's new policy. 

In respect of temporary, chronic-pain conditions, however, the situation was quite different. In a 
whole series of cases dating nearly from the creation of the Tribunal (of which Decision No.'s 9, 
11 and 50 are only the decisions to which reference is most often made), the Tribunal had 
regularly awarded temporary compensation benefits for disabilities of a chronic-pain nature and 
had done so with no limit on the retroactive payment of such benefits. 

With respect to temporary chronic pain benefits, the issue of the role of the WCB's new policy in 
the Tribunal's proceedings did not focus on the question of whether or not such cases should be 
referred back to the WCB for an initial determination. At this distance, it is not clear why that 
would not have been an issue. From the WCB's perspective the same interest in having the first 
opportunity to apply the new policy would seem to apply to these cases as to the 
permanent-pension cases. But in fact, at the Tribunal, the issue in these cases came to be focused 
instead simply on whether or not the Tribunal should now apply to the decisions it was making in 
this type of case the limit on the retroactivity of such benefits specified in the WCB's new policy. 

The Tribunal's response to this question was first articulated in Decision No. 519. The Hearing 
Panel in that case decided that it was not open to the WCB to change an established Tribunal 
position on an issue of general law merely by the board of directors adopting a new policy that 
was inconsistent with that position. In the Tribunal's view, the statute provides the WCB with 
only one avenue for directly affecting Tribunal decisions and that avenue is the review procedure 
under section 86n. The Tribunal, therefore, decided--initially in Decision No. 519, and 
subsequently in all following cases involving temporary, chronic pain benefits -- that it would 
continue to apply the position it had previously established with respect to the payment of 
temporary, chronic-pain benefits, and order them paid on a fully retroactive basis, unless and 
until the board of directors invoked its powers under section 86n and reviewed the Tribunal's 
position with respect to that issue. 

The board of directors decided to exercise it 86n review powers with respect to Decision No. 519 
and it has subsequently added to that review process all of the Tribunal decisions of the same 
nature in which the Decision No. 519 approach was followed. This was the second occasion for 
the 86n powers to be invoked, the first being with respect to Tribunal Decision No. 72. 

At the time Decision No. 519 was issued, the Tribunal's hearing panel in Decision No. 915 was 
still in the throes of itself considering what if any restrictions on the retroactivity of the 
chronic-pain benefits identified in Decision No. 915 should be imposed. This was an issue which 
Decision No. 915 had reserved for further submissions and consideration. In view of the fact that 
it was anticipated that the Tribunal's decision on the retroactivity issue in Decision No. 915 would 
be forthcoming shortly, the board of directors postponed the 86n proceedings on Decision No. 
519, and associated cases, pending the release of that decision. 

The retroactivity issue in Decision 915 was decided in Decision No.915A released on May 5, 1988. 
That decision concluded that as far as permanent, chronic-pain pension benefits were concerned, 
the Workers' Compensation Act, interpreted in accordance with the common law of retroactivity, 
required the application of reasonable limits on the retroactive effect of overrulings of previous 
institutional positions on generic legal or medical issues. It found, however, that the application 
of the common-law principles of retroactivity required a limitation on the retroactive application 
of the overruling with regard to chronic-pain permanent pension benefits which would allow 
those benefits to be paid in respect of any period after but not before March 27, 1986. This was 
the date on which the procedures which had lead ultimately to the Tribunal's chronic-pain 



xxii 



APPENDIX C 

overruling had commenced. This date was some 16 months prior to July 3, 1987, which was the 
date of limitation adopted by the WCB board of directors with respect to chronic-pain benefits. 
In the course of dealing with the retroactivity issue, the Hearing Panel in Decision No. 915A had 
occasion to make clear the Tribunal's understanding that the WCB's chronic-pain disorder policy 
was designed to compensate both of the elements of chronic pain defined in Decision No. 915 -- 
i.e., both enigmatic chronic pain and psychogenic pain magnification. It was then made clear by 
the WCB's staff, what we have discussed above, that that impression was wrong; that, as far as 
the WCB's staff is concerned, the policy does not extend to cases of pain magnification. 

By the end of the reporting period, the Appeals Tribunal had not yet issued a decision in an 
appeal of any case in which the WCB had applied its chronic pain disorder policy. The Tribunal 
has, therefore, had no occasion to consider how the WCB's chronic-pain policy may or may not 
comply with the requirements of the Act. However, the WCB's board of directors, already 
committed to an 86n review of Decision No.915A in conjunction with its review of Decision No. 
519 and associated decisions and the retroactivity issue which they present, was moved by 
Decision No. 915A's identification of the potential difference between the WCB and the Tribunal 
with respect to the issue of the compensability of pain magnification to now also bring Decision 
No. 915 under that same review. 

In that review process, which now includes Decision Nos. 519 (and related decisions), 915 and 
915A, the board of directors intends not only to deal with the retroactivity issue and the issues 
concerning the compensability of chronic- pain conditions, but also the issues concerning the 
Tribunal's obligations with respect to policy determinations by the board of directors. The agenda 
for that review can be found in The Ontario Gazette Vol. 121-44 (October 29, 1988) at 5546. 

As of the end of the reporting period, the board of directors was still receiving submissions on 
these issues. 

2. Fybromyalgia 

In Appeals Tribunal Decision No. 18 (March 11/87), the Tribunal had held that the condition 
referred to by the medical profession as fybromyalgia syndrome and sometimes also referred to as 
fibrositis was a disabling condition caused by organic pathology which could result from an 
industrial accident. It was, therefore, a compensable condition under the terms of the Workers' 
Compensation Act. 

Previous to this, the WCB's policy was that a condition diagnosed as fibrositis or fybromyalgia 
was not compensable. Like chronic-pain cases, it was not compensable either because the 
condition was all in the worker's head and subject to being overcome if only the worker was 
sufficiently motivated to get back to work, or it could not be said to have been caused by the 
work-related accident. 

When Tribunal Decision No. 18 was released, the WCB's staff recommended to the board of 
directors that the question of whether or not the decision should be subjected to a section 86n 
review be postponed and that the WCB's staff be authorized to undertake a review of the WCB's 
fibromyalgia policy with a view to coming back to the board of directors at a later stage with a 
recommendation as to whether or not a review was appropriate. The WCB's staff also 
recommended that, in the meantime, Decision No. 18 should be implemented. The board of 
directors accepted this recommendation, and the WCB's staff embarked upon a study of 
fibromyalgia and its compensability. 

While the study was in process, the WCB continued to apply its existing policy of not 
compensating such cases, while the Appeals Tribunal followed the lead of Decision No. 18 and in 



XXlll 



APPENDIX C 

a number of subsequent cases of fibromyalgia directed that compensation be paid. The WCB 
continued to implement the Tribunal's decisions in this respect while reserving on the question of 
a 86n review of such cases pending completion of the WCB's study. 

The WCB staff's final recommendation to the board of directors concerning the compensability of 
fibromyalgia was not presented to the board until November, 1988. In the interval several 
Tribunal decisions directing compensation benefits to be paid in respect of fibromyalgia 
conditions had been implemented by the WCB. 

The WCB's review of the compensability of fibromyalgia culminated in the staff recommending 
to the board of directors that it now adopt a new policy recognizing the compensability of 
disabling conditions diagnosed as fibromyalgia. The proposed policy was based on the similarities 
between a diagnosis of fybromyalgia and a diagnosis of chronic pain. It called for the WCB to 
proceed on the basis that the two conditions are not for practical purposes significantly 
distinguishable and to fold the fibromyalgia cases into the WCB's, chronic-pain disorder policy. 
Most significantly, the staff recommended that the chronic-pain policy's limit on the retroactive 
payment of benefits -- that is not to pay such benefits for any period prior to July 3, 1987 -- 
should also be applied to fybromyalgia cases. 

With respect to the decisions of the Tribunal in which the payment of benefits had been ordered 
without any limit on their retroactivity and which had been implemented by the WCB in the 
meantime, the WCB's staff recommended that no recovery of overpayments be sought. The single 
exception to this was a case in which a permanent pension had been ordered to be paid on the 
basis of a fibromyalgia diagnosis. The staff felt that it was consistent with its approach to 
Tribunal decisions awarding permanent pensions for chronic pain for periods prior to July 3, 
1987, to subject the latter case to the 86n review process now under way with respect to 
Decisions 519, Decision No. 915 and Decision No. 9I5A. The board of directors accepted the 
staff's recommendations and adopted the proposed new policy on fibromyalgia. 

3. The Payment of Interest On Delayed Benefits 

Tribunal Decision No. 206 A (Aug. 18/88) dealt with the contentious question of the WCB's 
obligation to pay interest on delayed or incorrectly withheld benefits. Apart from its substantive 
conclusion, and the WCB's reaction to that conclusion, the decision is interesting in the context of 
this further account of the developing Tribunal-WCB relationship for its extensive discussion and 
treatment of the question of the Tribunal's jurisdiction to consider and determine issues that arise 
at the Appeals Tribunal level but which the WCB has previously had no occasion to consider. 

On the substantive point. Decision No. 206A found that the law concerning the payment of 
interest on delayed or withheld benefits had changed in recent years. It concluded that applying 
the new law in this respect to the interpretation of the Workers' Compensation Act lead to the 
conclusion that the WCB was obligated to pay interest. 

The WCB's staff reviewed Decision No. 206A and advised the board of directors that while it did 
not agree there was any obliRation under the Act to pay interest, it did appear that there was now 
the authority to do so. The staff recommended that, without prejudice to the view that the WCB 
is not required to pay interest, the board of directors should decide not to review Decision No. 
206A and to approve the payment of interest on delayed or incorrectly withheld benefits. 

The board of directors accepted the recommendation and directed the staff to develop 
recommendations covering the details of an interest-payment policy. As of the end of the 
reporting period these recommendations were still pending. 



XXIV 



APPENDIX C 

Schedule 1 



PRACTICE DIRECTION NO: 9 



SUBJECT: PERMANENT PENSIONS -- CHRONIC PAIN 

1. This Practice Direction governs all permanent pension appeals and applications for leave to 
appeal in respect of decisions of the Board dated before October 1, 1987. The October 1 date has 
been chosen to allow for the post-July 3 period in which the Board would have been engaged in 
putting administrative arrangements in place for the application of its new chronic pain policy in 
its decision-making processes. 

2. In all such cases, where there are reasonable grounds to believe that the worker's disability or 
any significant part thereof is potentially related to a chronic pain condition, the case shall be 
referred to the Board for it to review the file in the light of its new chronic pain disorder policy. 
The Tribunal's further consideration of the case will be postponed until the Tribunal can have the 
benefit of the Board's final decision concerning the application of that policy to the case. A copy 
of the worker's file will be made available to the Board for that purpose. 

3. When, following the referral, the Board has made its final decision, the Tribunal will, upon the 
request of the appellant or applicant, resume its consideration of the case. 

4. Consideration of benefit entitlement prior to July 3, 1987, will also be postponed in such cases 
until after the Board has decided on the application of its policy in respect of the post-July 3 
period. 

5. This Practice Direction is predicated on the Tribunal's confidence that the Board's review of 
these files will be expedited appropriately having regard to the delays to which these cases have 
already been subject. Should the review by the Board be unreasonably delayed, the Tribunal 
reserves the right to resume hearing and determining the case without waiting for the Board's 
final decision. 

6. The Tribunal Counsel Office will identify those cases in which the application of this policy 
will, in its opinion, probably lead to a postponement of the appeal or application. With respect to 
such cases, the Tribunal Counsel Office will seek confirmation of the Board's intention to review 
the file. Upon receipt of such confirmation, affected parties will be advised of the Tribunal 
Counsel Office's opinion as to the probable application of this postponement policy to their case. 

7. Parties who wish to contest the application of this Practice Direction to their case will be 
granted a hearing before a Tribunal hearing panel to consider the following issues: 

(a) Does this Practice Direction as written apply to their case? 

(b) If it does, then having due regard for the reasons for the Direction, is there 
justification for granting an exception to the Practice Direction? 

8. The Practice Direction will be applied at whatever stage of the Tribunal's process the 
identification of permanent pension chronic- pain-related issues is made, and will extend to the 
few cases in which hearings have already been held (and no final decision issued as of the date of 
this Practice Direction) subject, of course, to due consideration of the paragraph no. 7 issues in 
the light of any submissions of the parties in respect of such issues. 

XXV 



APPENDIX C 

Schedule 1 



9. Appellants or applicants may act on the advice of the Tribunal Counsel Office and accept 
without protest postponement of their cases for the purpose of the Board review, without 
prejudice to their subsequent rights. 

10. The Tribunal would emphasize that its identification of a case to which this Practice 
Direction applies does not indicate a Tribunal decision that chronic pain in fact exists in that case 
or that there is any entitlement to benefits in respect of a chronic pain condition. Those are 
issues which will remain to be determined by the Board in the first instance subject to Tribunal 
review upon appeal. The application of the Practice Direction indicates only the Tribunal's 
identification of the existence of chronic-pain-related issues. 

EXPLANATION 

Background 

This Practice Direction addresses issues which have arisen with respect to the Tribunal's handling 
of permanent pension appeals (and applications for leave to appeal) with respect to permanent 
pension cases. 

The hearing of permanent pension appeals was put on hold by the Tribunal in December 1985, 
pending completion of its pension assessment appeals leading case strategy. This strategy 
involved the Appeals Tribunal hearing one selected pension appeal in which the Workers' 
Compensation Board, and invited intervenors from the employer and worker communities, 
participated with the parties in providing the Tribunal with information, evidence and 
submissions on the very difficult issues which arise in permanent pension appeals. Following 27 
days of hearings, the Tribunal issued its Decision No. 915. 

Decision 915 is a lengthy decision in which pension appeals issues are analyzed in considerable 
depth with a view to providing an informed starting point for Tribunal hearing panels in other 
pension appeal cases. The decision dealt with two major issues: the interpretation of section 
45(1) and chronic pain. 

In the chronic pain part of Decision 915 the Tribunal concluded that disabilities attributable to 
enigmatic chronic pain did occur, and when they occurred in circumstances which established a 
significant causative role for a preceding industrial injury they were compensable. These were 
conclusions which were inconsistent with the Board's views on the same issues. However, during 
the period when the 915 case was being heard and decided, the Board was also engaged in its own 
policy review concerning the compensability of chronic pain disorders. Decision 915 issued in 
May 1987, and on July 3, 1987, the WCB Board of Directors approved a new Board policy 
governing permanent pension compensation for disabilities attributable to chronic pain disorders 
resulting from industrial injuries. The new policy defines chronic pain disorders and establishes 
pension assessment policies in respect of disabilities attributable to such disorders. 

The new Board policy makes no reference to Decision 915 and the compatibility between 915 and 
the Board's new policy remains unexplored. 

It is apparent that the Board's new chronic pain policy and Decision 915 both mark a major 
departure from previous policies in Canadian workers' compensation systems. It is also apparent 
that they both mark the very beginning of a policy development process that promises to be long 
and difficult. It is obvious from the Decision 915 analysis and the nature of the Board's new 
policy that permanent pensions for workers for disabilities attributable to chronic pain disorders 
involve numerous difficult and complex questions the answers to which can be expected to 

xxvi 



APPENDIX C 

Schedule 1 

develop only through the experience of actually applying the policy to a range of concrete 
particular cases. 

In July 1987, the Tribunal began scheduling hearings of permanent pension cases which had 
previously been on hold pending the 915 decision. As of the date of this Practice Direction, 
hearings have been held in a number of cases but decisions have not been completed in any case. 
Hearing panel experiences with these cases have served, however, to confirm how often chronic 
pain may be expected to be a potential factor in pension appeals and to impress the Tribunal even 
further as to the difficulty and complexity of the issues in these cases. 

It is against the background of these developments that the procedural issues involved in this 
Practice Direction fell to be considered. 

Reasons for the Direction 

In the three months sine the adoption by the Board of its new chronic pain policy, the Tribunal 
has become aware of the Board's staff's concern that the Board's role in the primary development 
of compensation policy is threatened in respect of the chronic pain policy by the Tribunal 
hearing and deciding permanent pension chronic pain issues in the first instance. The occasion 
for the Tribunal going first on these issues arises because of the number of pension decisions on 
appeal to the Tribunal which pre-date the Board's new policy (about 500 cases). Indeed, in an 
exchange of views between the Board's Acting General Counsel and the Tribunal's General 
Counsel, the Board's staff has made its view clear that as of July 3, 1987, the legislation prevents 
the Tribunal from hearing any issues related to permanent pensions for chronic pain disorders 
which the Board has not had an opportunity to consider in the light of its new policy. The 
Board's staff relies for this view on section 86g(2) of the Workers' Compensation Act. 

The Tribunal has had no occasion so far to address in the context of a particular case the issue of 
jurisdiction to hear and determine permanent pension chronic pain issues in the absence of the 
Board having had an opportunity, post-July 3, 1987, to consider such issues in the light of its 
new chronic pain disorder policy. However, the broad outlines of the competing arguments are 
easily discerned. Section 86g(2) may properly be read as prohibiting the Tribunal from hearing, 
determining or disposing of an appeal respecting issues of health care, vocational rehabilitation, 
entitlement to compensation or benefits, assessments, penalties or the transfer of costs unless the 
procedures established by the Board for consideration of such issues have been exhausted. The 
argument in favour of the position taken by the Board's staff in respect of this matter is, 
presumably, that since July 3, 1987, the Board has an established procedure for considering 
permanent pension chronic pain issues, and that with respect to chronic pain issues in cases 
decided by the Board prior to July 3, and on appeal to the Tribunal, those procedures have not 
been applied, much less exhausted. Thus, it can be argued, as of July 3 the Tribunal lost 
jurisdiction to consider permanent pension chronic pain issues in those cases until the Board has 
the opportunity to consider those issues in the light of its new policy. 

The counter-argument is equally apparent. Satisfaction of the requirement that the procedures in 
respect of any particular issues have been exhausted is to be judged as of the date of the decision 
appealed. If all procedures have been exhausted and the decision is final at the time it is made, 
the right of appeal under section 86o(l) arises, and the subsequent creation of relevant procedures 
by the Board cannot affect the matter. 

The Tribunal has also been made aware of the Board's staff's intention to have the Board review 
the files of all permanent pension cases on appeal to the Appeals Tribunal involving chronic pain 
issues with a view to now considering and deciding those issues through the application of the 
Board's new policy on chronic pain disorders. The Tribunal had been asked to provide the Board 

xxvii 



APPENDIX C 

Schedule 1 

with a list of such cases for that purpose. It is the Tribunal's understanding that in reviewing the 
files for this purpose the Board will consider all related issues such as possible entitlement to 
sections 45(5) and 45(7) supplements, the availability of medical or vocational rehabilitation 
programs, etc. 

To avoid misunderstanding, it is to be noted that the Board does not intend its new policy to have 
any retroactive effect prior to July 3, 1987. It will not be considering benefits entitlement in 
respect of any period prior to that date. The issue of the retroactivity of permanent pension 
benefits in respect of chronic pain was reserved in Decision 915 pending further argument. That 
argument has now been heard and the Decision 915 Hearing Panel is in the process of deciding 
that issue. 

All of the foregoing circumstances, including the Tribunal's experience so far in dealing with 
pension appeals involving chronic pain issues, have identified for the Tribunal a number of 
concerns with the prospect of the Tribunal issuing decisions on permanent pension chronic pain 
issues before the Board has had an opportunity to consider the application of its new policy to 
those issues. These concerns are listed below. Not included in the list, it should be noted, is the 
question of jurisdiction. The Tribunal has always assumed that it had jurisdiction to hear appeals 
of Board decisions where at the time the decision was made the decision was final and all 
procedures in place at that time for consideration of the matters mentioned in sections 86g(])(b) 
and (c) had been exhausted. Until that view of the Tribunal's jurisdiction is challenged in a 
particular case, the Tribunal believes it is right and necessary to proceed on the basis that that 
view of the Tribunal's jurisdiction is correct. 

The list of the Tribunal's concerns is as follows: 

1. It is true that the substance of the new chronic pain permanent pension policy will, as a 
practical matter, emerge gradually through the application of the newly proclaimed policy to 
individual concrete cases. Whoever has the role of making decisions concerning the application 
of the new policy to individual cases in the first instance is likely to have a substantial special 
influence on the direction that policy development takes. And whatever one may think of the 
competing arguments concerning jurisdiction in the particular circumstances of these cases, there 
is no doubt that as a general rule the Legislature intended this primary role for the Board and not 
for the Tribunal. See the explicit recognition of this fact in Tribunal Decision 3 and the Interim 
Report in the Pension Assessment Appeals Leading Case Strategy. The possibility that the 
Tribunal would have the primary role in a substantial number of early chronic pain permanent 
pension cases arises only because of the chance chronology of the particular events leading up to 
the introduction of the Board's new policy. 

2. If the Tribunal proceeds to hear these cases without the benefit of an original Board decision 
in respect of the permanent pension chronic pain issues, the application of the new policy to 
those decisions will be decided in a process involving the possibility of one decision only (not 
counting the possible Section 86n Review). In respect of issues of such difficulty, novelty and 
complexity, this is arguably not an appropriate process. And this is true from the perspective of 
the system as well as from the perspective of the parties. 

3. In chronic pain cases, as in other cases, it is especially difficult to consider questions of 
possible treatment, availability of vocational rehabilitation resources and questions concerning 
entitlement to supplements, without the Board's initial input. Leaving aside jurisdiction 
questions, these are issues which inherently require initial consideration by the Board and which 
in other cases the Tribunal typically refers back to the Board for initial decision when they arise 
for the first time at the Tribunal level as a result of a finding in favour of entitlement. 



xxviii 



APPENDIX C APPENDIX C 

Schedule 1 Schedule 1 

4. As far as the assessment of permanent pension benefits related to chronic pain disorders is 
concerned, for the reasons set out at length in Decision 915, a Tribunal hearing panel is likely to 
require a pension reassessment by Board doctors before it will be in a position to come to its own 
conclusion. Furthermore, in the interests of avoiding the development of two pension assessment 
systems in respect of chronic pain--one applied by the Board and another applied by the 
Tribunal--it is really essential that the Tribunal be in the position of reviewing the Board's 
assessment in any particular case rather than developing one of its own. It is true that in 
Decision 915, the Tribunal determined the assessment itself, but that was with the assistance of 
reassessment evidence from Board doctors and at a time when the Board had no chronic pain 
assessment policy. It follows, therefore, that even if the Tribunal were to proceed with the cases 
now before it without waiting for the Board review, hearing panels could be expected to 
routinely refer at least the assessment question back to the Board for initial determination. 

5. It is apparent, therefore, that for the reasons set out in paragraphs 3 and 4, there will almost 
certainly have to be a referral of very substantial matters to the Board in virtually all chronic 
pain permanent pension cases, however the procedural questions are dealt with. 

6. The Board's decision to undertake its own review of the potential application of its new 
chronic pain disorder policy to the permanent pension cases now on appeal to the Tribunal 
creates the situation where, if the Tribunal proceeds in the ordinary course, it will be considering 
appeals from the Board's original decisions while knowing that the Board is in the process of 
producing a new decision. The Tribunal's decisions on the appeals and the Board's new decisions 
on the same cases are likely to appear at about the same time. The Board's new decisions will be 
appealable in the ordinary course to the Tribunal and the Board is likely to regard its new 
decisions as superceding its original decisions. In those circumstances, it is to be expected that 
the status of the Tribunal's decision on the appeal of the original decision would be uncertain. 

7. In the nature of things, particularly at this early stage of the development of chronic pain 
concepts, it is also reasonable to expect that the Board's new decisions and the Tribunal's 
decisions on the appeal of the original decisions will not always come to the same conclusion on 
either the facts or the medical or legal issues. 

8. The potential for confusion in the circumstances described in paragraphs 6 and 7 is 
remarkable, as is the potential for litigation and a further period of delay and uncertainty. In the 
Tribunal's view, given the complexity and difficulty of compensation issues in permanent pension 
chronic pain cases, and having regard to the history of delay that already pertains with respect to 
these cases, it is essential that the development of law and policy in respect of these issues now 
proceed in as straightforward a manner as possible. This, too, is important not only from the 
parties' perspective but also from the system's perspective. 

Having regard to all of the foregoing, the Tribunal has decided that it is now necessary to adopt a 
procedure with respect to permanent pension appeals which will ensure that permanent pension 
compensation issues related to chronic pain disorders will not be addressed by the Tribunal until 
after the Board has had an opportunity to consider the application of its new policy to those 
issues. The foregoing Practice Direction has been designed with that end in view. 

Dated at Toronto, October 23, 1987 

Workers' Compensation Appeals Tribunal 

S. R. Ellis 

Chairman 

xxix 



WORKERS' COMPENSATION APPEALS TRIBUNAL 
THIRD REPORT 

APPENDIX D 
INCOMING CASELOAD STATISTICS 



1. Monthly Breakdown of Incoming Appeals 

2. Case Input by Type of Appeal 

3. Case Input by Type of Appeal 
(During 39-nionth Period) 



APPENDIX D 



MONTHLY BREAKDOWN OF INCOMING APPEALS 



DESCRIPTION 



mPUT BY TYPE : 



Previous 
Year 
Total 



Period 

To Date 39 Month Total 

Total From Oct. 1985 



10/87 11/87 12/87 01/88 02/88 01/88 04/88 05/88 06/88 07/88 08/88 09/88 10/88 11/88 12/88 



S86o 


120 


7 


1 


9 


4 


11 


6 


3 


4 


10 


4 


4 


4 


4 


2 


4 


77 


484 


7.5X 


S15 


97 


10 


6 


9 


8 


8 


8 


3 


8 


3 


10 


3 


14 


2 


4 


7 


103 


322 


5. OX 


S21 


79 


4 


8 


4 


1 


5 


4 


14 


9 


7 


8 


4 


3 


10 


5 


1 


87 


210 


3.3X 


S77 


317 


28 


18 


25 


32 


21 


25 


19 


23 


23 


32 


13 


16 


16 


14 


21 


326 


764 


11.9% 


Pens i on 


192 


8 


6 


8 


9 


3 


4 


1 





2 








2 





1 





44 


588 


9. IX 


Cormutation 


15 


2 


2 


4 


1 


2 





1 





4 





1 


6 








2 


25 


43 


0.7X 


Employer Assessment 


29 








2 


1 


2 


3 














1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


14 


67 


l.OX 


Judicial Review 


7 

















1 





2 


1 




















4 


13 


0.2% 


Ombudsman's Request 


48 





7 


11 





6 


10 


7 


8 


12 


4 


5 


19 


4 


2 


8 


103 


156 


2.4% 


Reconsideration 


48 


5 


3 


7 


8 


8 


7 


9 


5 


1 


2 


7 


5 


9 


5 


12 


93 


148 


2.3% 


No Jurisdiction 


54 


3 








2 


1 


5 





3 


3 


2 





2 








1 


22 


234 


3.6X 


Entitlement 


877 


58 


54 


66 


87 


72 


90 


51 


76 


65 


90 


56 


61 


65 


57 


85 


1,033 


3,417 


53. IX 


rotal 


1.876 


125 


105 


145 


153 


139 


163 


108 


138 


131 


152 


94 


133 


112 


91 


142 


1.931 


6.439 


100. OX 



S.86o - Leave to appeal applicationo- 

S.15 - Applications for ruling as to whether Act prohibits civil litigation. 
S.21 - Worker's objection to attending at employer organited medical examination. 
S.77 - Appeals on WCB decisions concerning access to worker's files. 
Pension - Permanent partial disability pension appeals- 
Commutation - Appeals from WCB decisions on worker's application for payment of lump sum in lieu of period payments. 
Employer Assessment - Appeals by employer of WCB assessment decisions. 
Judicial Review - Application to the divisional court for review of a Tribunal decision. 
Ombudsman's Request - Inquiry from the Ombudsman following complaints regarding Tribunal decisions 
Reconsideration - Application for the Tribunal to reconsider a decision of the Tribunal. 
No Jurisdiction - Cases found at a preliminary stage not to be within the jurisdiction of the Tribunal. 

Entitlement and Others - Regular appeals from WCB decisions on entitlement and quantum plus a few miscellaneous matters. 
* Prior year adjustments - 23 cases for the first reporting period and 22 cases for the second reportmg period. 
•* Based on the date of receipt of WCB files 



XXX 



APPENDIX D 



o. 
o. 

< 



■ 9> 

JS 

s 

3 

z 



CASE INPUT BY TYPE OF APPEAL 

October 1987 to December 1988 




Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 



Months 

/vSi/'^-''^ i^ S.2J ^ S.77 f^ Enl. 



Post Decision ^J S.86o 



APPENDIX D 



CASE INPUT BY TYPE OF APPEAL 
During 39 month period 



Pension & Commutation C9 8%^ 



Post Decision Issue * Q4 .9%') 



S BBo C^ 4%) 

S. 15 C5.D%D 



S, 77 C11 .9%D 



S. 21 C3.3^D 




Entitlement C57 7%3 



*Post-Decision issues include reconsideration applications, 
Ombudsman 's inquiries and judicial review cases. 



XXXU 



WORKERS' COMPENSATION APPEALS TRIBUNAL 
THIRD REPORT 

APPENDIX E 
CASELOAD STATISTICS 



1. Monthly Production Statistics 

2. Monthly Current Caseload Statistics 

3. Summary of Current Caseload Statistics 

4. Input and Output Trend 



APPENDIX E 



MONTHLY PRODUCTION STATISTICS 

Monthly Increments 
Previous 15-month 

Year Total 10/87 11/87 12/87 01/88 02/88 03/88 04/88 05/88 06/88 07/88 08/88 09/88 10/88 11/88 12/88 Period 39 Month Total 
* ** To Date From Oct 1985 

Total 
INPUT: 

nxMikxr of Cases 1,876 125 105 U5 153 139 163 108 138 131 152 94 133 112 91 U2 1,931 6,439 

OUTPUT: 

Cases Ui thdrawn 

Cases with no jurisdiction 

Other 

Cases disposed due to dormancy 

Cases settled 

Disposition of post-decision cases 3 

Disposition through Case Direction Panel 

Total non-hearing disposal (A) 

Cases uith final decisions issued (B) 

TOTAL CASES FINALLY DISPOSED OF (A^)f 

Notes: 

• Prior Year Adjustments to incoming appeals ■ 23 cases for first reporting period and 2Z cases for second reporting period. 
** Colums show monthly additions only, 
a These are dispositions of Reconsideration Application, Ontoudsman's Request and Judicial Review cases. 

# These figures exclude interim decisions and decisions on reconsideration applications. 



286 


13 


18 


15 


19 


17 


37 


19 


23 


21 


11 


11 


54 


18 


30 


25 


311 


744 


16. 5X 


ra 


1 


5 


1 





5 


7 


2 





16 


6 


9 


3 


5 


3 


2 


65 


305 


6.8X 


11 


1 








1 


2 


7 


8 


7 


3 


6 


2 


2 


12 


8 


42 


101 


116 


2.6% 


80 


9 


2 


4 


3 


3 


23 





1 


5 


4 


1 


6 


16 


4 





81 


151 


3.6X 


51 


9 


5 


13 


9 


7 


10 


14 


6 


16 


12 


9 


7 


4 


8 


5 


134 


190 


4.2X 


45 





U 


11 


6 


4 


8 


3 


10 


8 


7 


10 


9 


15 


11 


12 


118 


163 


3.6X 


2 


















































3 


o.u 


553 


33 


34 


44 


38 


38 


92 


46 


47 


69 


46 


42 


61 


70 


64 


86 


810 


1,682 


37. 3X 


952 


70 


92 


138 


82 


112 


121 


108 


133 


134 


115 


96 


103 


98 


80 


149 


1,631 


2,833 


52. 7X 


1,505 


103 


126 


182 


120 


150 


213 


1S« 


180 


203 


161 


138 


164 


168 


144 


235 


ZM^ 


4,515 


100. OX 



XXXlll 



APPENDIX E 



MONTHLY CURRENT CASELOAD STATISTICS 



CASES AT PREHEARING STAGE : • 

POST-HEARING CASES : 

Recessed 

Complete but on hold 

Ready- to- write decision 

TOTAL CASES AT POST-HEARING STAGE 

TOTAL CASELOAD 



As at End 

of 

Previous 

rear End 10/30 11/30 12/31 01/29 02/26 04/01 04/29 05/27 07/01 07/29 08/26 09/30 10/28 11/25 12/30 
30-Sep-87 1987 1987 1987 1988 1988 1988 1988 1988 1988 1988 1988 1988 1988 1988 1988 

1,631 1,643 1,643 1,652 1,692 1,706 1,688 1,670 1,695 1,648 1,661 1,657 1,640 1,591 1,539 1,510 



68 
165 
525 




63 

177 
531 




64 
172 
526 


62 
182 
489 


61 
195 
468 


58 
172 
445 


53 

163 
445 


54 
145 
416 


49 
147 
377 


39 
124 
355 


36 
128 
352 




39 

107 
340 


49 
100 
333 


46 
106 
321 


46 
116 
315 


43 
101 
270 


758 




771 




762 


733 


724 


675 


661 


615 


573 


518 


516 




486 


482 


473 


477 


414 


2.389 


2 


,4U 


2 


,405 


2,385 


2.416 


2.381 


2.3*9 


2.285 


2.268 


2.166 


2.177 


2 


.143 


2.122 


2.064 


2.016 


1.924 



Note; 

• This figure includes Pension-Chronic Pain cases. 



XXXIV 



APPENDIX E 



SUMMARY OF CURRENT CASELOAD STATISTICS 

As at end of Reporting Period 
December 30, 1988 



Incoming cases over 39 months 
Output of cases over 39 months 



6,439 
4,515 



Current caseload at end of reporting period 
At Pre-hearing Stage 
At Post-hearing Stage 

Total Current Caseload 



1,510 
414 

1,924 



XXXV 



INPUT AND OUTPUT TREND 



(0 

a 

Q. 

< 



7QD 



600 



500 - 



400 - 



300 - 



200 



100 - 



Three Year Trend Analysis 




"1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 

1986 1985 1986 1986 1987 1987 1987 1987 198£ 



QUARTERS 



1 r 

1988 1988 1988 



▼ Decisions and Non-Hearing Dispositions 

+ Hearings and Non- Hearing Dispositions 

^g Input 

A Decisions 

A, Hearings 



WORKERS' COMPENSATION APPEALS TRIBUNAL 
THIRD REPORT 

APPENDIX F 
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR FISCAL PERIODS 



\. Statement of Expenditure - 9 Months 

2. Variance Report - 9 Months 

3. Statement of Expenditure - 12 Months 

4. Variance Report - 12 Months 



APPENDIX F 



STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 

For nine month period ending December 31, 1988 
(In 1,000s) 



SALARIES & WAGES 

1310 SALARIES & WAGES - REGULAR 
1320 SALARIES & WAGES - OVERTIME 
1325 SALARIES & WAGES - CONTRACT 
1510 TEMPORARY HELP - GO TEMP. 
1520 TEMP. HELP-OUTSIDE AGENCIES 



TOTAL SALARY AND WAGES 



EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 

2110 CANADA PENSION PLAN 

2130 UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE 

2220 PUB. SER. SUPERANNUATION FUND 

2230 P.S.S.F. ADJUSTMENT FUND 

2260 P.S.S.F. UNFUNDED LIABILITIES 

2310 ONTARIO HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN 

2320 SUPPL. HEALTH & HOSPITAL PLAN 

2330 LONG-TERM INCOME PROTECTION 

23A0 GROUP LIFE INSURANCE 

2350 DENTAL PLAN 

2410 WORKER'S COMPENSATION 

2520 MATERNITY SUPP. BENEFIT ALL. 

2990 BENEFITS TRANSFER (16.58%) 



TOTAL EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 



TRANSPORTATION & COMMUNICATION 



3110 


COURIER/OTHER DELIVERY CHARGES 


3111 


LONG DISTANCE CHARGES 


3112 


BELL TEL 


. - SERVICE .EQUIPMENT 


3210 


POSTAGE 




3410 


RELOCATION EXPENSES 


3610 


TRAVEL - 


ACCOMMODATION & FOOD 


3620 


TRAVEL - 


AIR 


3630 


TRAVEL - 


RAIL 


3640 


TRAVEL - 


ROAD 


3660 


TRAVEL - 


CONFERENCES, SEMINARS 


3680 


TRAVEL - 


ATTENDANCE (HEARINGS) 


3690 


TRAVEL - 


PROFESS. & PUB. OUTREACH 


3720 


TRAVEL - 


OTHER 


3721 


TRAVEL - 


PT VICE CHAIR & REPS 



04/88 TO 

12/88 

BUDGET 



04/88 TO 

12/88 
ACTUAL 



TOTAL TRANSPORTATION & COMMUNICATION 



3,015.0 


2,967.0 


37.5 


40.5 


360.0 


208.5 


52.5 


37.2 


52.5 


136.8 


3,517.5 


3,390.0 


0.0 


38.1 


0.0 


75.0 


0.0 


76.1 


0.0 


15.7 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


36.3 


0.0 


20.1 


0.0 


15.6 


0.0 


7.0 


0.0 


20.3 


0.0 


1.1 


0.0 


38.3 


0.0 


0.0 


465.8 


343.8 


33.8 


25.1 


11.3 


10.1 


45.0 


37.2 


40.5 


31.8 


7.5 


0.0 


75.0 


35.0 


0.0 


25.7 


0.0 


0.8 


0.0 


15.0 


18.8 


19.3 


26.3 


28.7 


6.0 


4.2 


0.0 


1.2 


41.3 


30.3 


305.3 


264.3 



XXXVll 



APPENDIX F 

SERVICES 

4120 PUBLIC RELATIONS 

4130 ADVERTISING - EMPLOYMENT 

4210 RENTALS - COMPUTER EQUIPMENT 

4220 RENTALS - OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

4230 RENTALS - OFFICE FURNITURE 

4240 RENTALS - PHOTOCOPYING 

4260 RENTALS - OFFICE SPACE 

4261 RENTALS - HEARING ROOMS 
4270 RENTALS - OTHER 

4310 DATA PROCESS SERVICE 
4320 INSURANCE 

4340 RECEPTIONS - HOSPITALITY 

4341 RECEPTIONS - RENTALS 

4350 WITNESS FEES 

4351 PROCESS SERVERS - SUBPOENAS 
4360 PER DIEM ALLOW-PT VC. & REPS 
4410 CONSULTANTS - MGT. SERVICES 
4420 CONSULTANT-SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT 

4430 COURT REPORTING SERVICES 

4431 CONSULTANTS - LEGAL SERVICES 
4435 TRANSCRIPTION 

4440 MED. FEE-PER DIEM/RETAINER/REP 
4460 RESEARCH SERVICES 
4470 PRINT-DEC./NEWSLTRS/PAMPHLETS 
4520 REPAIR/MAIN.-FURNIT./OFF.EQUIP. 

4710 OTHER-INCL. MEMBERSHIP FEES 

4711 TRANSLATION & INTERPRET. SER. 

4712 STAFF DEVELOPMENT-COURSE FEES 

4713 FRENCH TRANSLATION SERVICES 

4714 OTHER FRENCH COSTS 



TOTAL SERVICES 

SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT 

5090 PROJECTORS, CAMERAS, SCREENS 

5110 COMPUTER EQUIP. INCL. SOFTWARE 

5120 OFFICE FURNITURE & EQUIPMENT 

5130 OFFICE MACHINES 

5710 OFFICE SUPPLIES 

5720 BOOKS, PUBLICATIONS, REPORTS 

TOTAL SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT 

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 
CAPITAL EXPENDITURES 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 



0.0 


0.0 


7.5 


14.7 


0.0 


57.2 


7.5 


6.2 


0.8 


1.3 


67.5 


89.6 


600.0 


660.6 


15.0 


12.2 


0.8 


0.0 


18.8 


14.5 


3.8 


0.0 


15.0 


34.6 


0.0 


0.5 


22.5 


15.6 


4.5 


2.7 


375.0 


292.9 


18.8 


53.3 


0.0 


55.4 


90.0 


79.9 


18.8 


2.0 


75.0 


58.0 


225.0 


138.3 


3.8 


0.0 


150.0 


89.0 


11.3 


39.7 


22.5 


47.8 


45.0 


35.7 


45.0 


20.3 


56.3 


31.0 


0.0 


0.0 


1,899.8 


1,853.2 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


22.5 


0.0 


7.5 


0.0 


37.5 


89.6 


30.0 


37.1 


97.5 


126.8 


6,285.8 


5,978.0 


337.5 


307.6 


6,623.3 


6,285.6 



XXXVlll 



APPENDIX F 
VARIANCE REPORT 

For nine month period ending December 31, 1988 
( in 1,000s) 



VARIANCE 

$ % 



1987/88 


1987/88 


Annual 


Annual 


Budget 


Expenditure 



Salaries & Wages 


3,517.5 


3,390.0 


127.5 


3.6 


Employee Benefits 


465.8 


343.8 


122.0 


26.2 


Transportation 










& Communications 


305.3 


264.3 


41.0 


13.4 


Services 


1,899.8 


1,853.2 


46.6 


2.5 


Supplies 










& Equipment 


97.5 


126.8 


-29.3 


-30.0 


Total Operating 










Expenditures 


6,285.8 


5,978.0 


307.9 


4.9 


Capital 










Expenditures 


337.5 


307.6 


29.9 


8.9 



Total Expenditures 6,623.3 6,285.6 337.8 5.1 



XXXIX 



APPENDIX F 



STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 

For 12 months ending March 31, 1988 
(In 1,000s) 



SALARIES & WAGES 

1310 SALARIES & WAGES - REGULAR 
1320 SALARIES & WAGES - OVERTIME 
1325 SALARIES & WAGES - CONTRACT 
1510 TEMPORARY HELP - GO TEMP. 
1520 TEMP. HELP-OUTSIDE AGENCIES 



TOTAL SALARY AND WAGES 



EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 

2110 CANADA PENSION PLAN 

2130 UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE 

2220 PUB. SER. SUPERANNUATION FUND 

2230 P.S.S.F. ADJUSTMENT FUND 

2260 P.S.S.F. UNFUNDED LIABILITIES 

2310 ONTARIO HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN 

2320 SUPPL. HEALTH & HOSPITAL PLAN 

2330 LONG-TERM INCOME PROTECTION 

2340 GROUP LIFE INSURANCE 

2350 DENTAL PLAN 

2410 WORKERS' COMPENSATION 

2520 MATERNITY SUPP. BENEFIT ALL. 

2990 BENEFITS TRANSFER (16.58%) 



TOTAL EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 



TRANSPORTATION & COMMUNICATION 

3110 COURIER/OTHER DELIVERY CHARGES 

3111 LONG DISTANCE CHARGES 

3112 BELL TEL. - SERVICE .EQUIPMENT 
3210 POSTAGE 

3410 RELOCATION EXPENSES 

3610 TRAVEL - ACCOMMODATION & FOOD 

3620 TRAVEL - AIR 

3630 TRAVEL - RAIL 

3640 TRAVEL - ROAD 

3660 TRAVEL - CONFERENCES, SEMINARS 

3680 TRAVEL - ATTENDANCE (HEARINGS) 



1987/88 


1987/88 


Annua I 


Actual 


Budget 


Expenditure 


3,706.8 


3,303.3 


25.0 


52.4 


0.0 


511.5 


0.0 


71.0 


150.0 


205.4 


3,881.8 


4,143.6 


0.0 


45.6 


0.0 


85.9 


0.0 


79.9 


0.0 


17.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


42.4 


0.0 


18.9 


0.0 


15.2 


0.0 


7.7 


0.0 


19.4 


0.0 


0.2 


0.0 


6.3 


0.0 


0.7 


577.8 


339.0 


25.0 


51.6 


15.0 


16.1 


50.0 


40.8 


60.0 


59.3 


0.0 


0.0 


180.0 


51.4 


0.0 


29.6 


0.0 


1.3 


0.0 


21.3 


15.0 


20.0 


150.0 


39.6 



xl 



3690 TRAVEL-PROFESS. & PUB. OUTREACH 

3720 TRAVEL - OTHER 

3721 TRAVEL-PT VICE CHAIR & REPS 



25.0 


3.6 


2.0 


1.3 


24.0 


58.7 



TOTAL TRANSPORTATION & COMMUNICATION 



SERVICES 



546.0 



394.7 



4220 RENTALS 
4230 RENTALS 
4240 RENTALS 

4260 RENTALS 

4261 RENTALS 
4270 RENTALS 



4120 PUBLIC RELATIONS 
4130 ADVERTISING - EMPLOYMENT 
4210 RENTALS - COMPUTER EQUIPMENT 
OFFICE EQUIPMENT 
OFFICE FURNITURE 
PHOTOCOPYING 
OFFICE SPACE 
HEARING ROOMS 
OTHER 

4310 DATA PROCESS SERVICE 
4320 INSURANCE 

4340 RECEPTIONS - HOSPITALITY 

4341 RECEPTIONS - RENTALS 

4350 WITNESS FEES 

4351 PROCESS SERVERS - SUBPOENAS 
4360 PER DIEM ALLOW-PT VC. & REPS 
4410 CONSULTANTS - MGT. SERVICES 
4420 CONSULTANT-SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT 

4430 COURT REPORTING SERVICES 

4431 CONSULTANTS - LEGAL SERVICES 
4435 TRANSCRIPTION 

4440 MED. FEE-PER DIEM/RETAINER/REP 
4460 RESEARCH SERVICES 
4470 PRINT-DEC./NEWSLTRS/PAMPHLETS 
4520 REPAIR/MAIN.-FURNIT./OFF.EQUIP. 

4710 OTHER-INCL. MEMBERSHIP FEES 

4711 TRANSLATION & INTERPRET. SER. 

4712 STAFF DEVELOPMENT-COURSE FEES 

4713 FRENCH TRANSLATION SERVICES 
4990 MINISTRY OF LABOUR 



TOTAL SERVICES 

SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT 

5090 PROJECTORS, CAMERAS, SCREENS 

5110 COMPUTER EQUIP. INCL. SOFTWARE 

5120 OFFICE FURNITURE & EQUIPMENT 

5130 OFFICE MACHINES 

5710 OFFICE SUPPLIES 

5720 BOOKS, PUBLICATIONS, REPORTS 



TOTAL SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT 

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 
CAPITAL EXPENDITURES 



10.0 


5.0 


2.0 


15.0 


40.0 


55.1 


7.5 


39.0 


0.0 


4.1 


90.0 


90.6 


643.1 


738.1 


25.0 


19.4 


8.0 


0.7 


10.0 


62.2 


5.0 


0.0 


15.0 


25.7 


0.0 


0.0 


50.0 


29.9 


5.0 


7.6 


750.0 


471.1 


50.0 


9.5 


0.0 


0.0 


180.0 


110.3 


80.0 


12.8 


100.0 


44.2 


400.0 


206.2 


10.0 


0.3 


180.0 


177.4 


8.0 


24.9 


12.0 


52.9 


75.0 


54.8 


64.0 


31.1 


90.0 


31.5 


100.0 


0,0 


3,009.6 


2,319.6 


3.0 


0.5 


0.0 


1.0 


50.0 


5.5 


10.0 


1.5 


100.0 


127.0 


50.0 


46.4 


213.0 


181.9 


8,228.2 


7,378.9 


1,650.0 


1,549.6 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES 



9.878.2 



8,928.5 



Xll 



APPENDIX F 



VARIANCE REPORT 

For 12 month period ending March 31, 1988 
(in 1,000s) 



1987/88 1987/88 

Annual Actual VARIANCE 

Budget Expenditure $ 



Salaries & Wages 

Employee Benefits 

Transportation 

& Communications 

Services 

Supplies 

& Equipment 



Total Operating 
Expenditures 

Capital 
Expenditures 



Total Expenditures 



3,881.8 4,143.6 -261.8 -6.7 

577.8 339.0 238.8 41.3 



546.0 



213.0 



394.7 



3,009.6 2,319.6 



181.9 



8,228.2 7,378.9 



1,650.0 1,549.6 



151.3 



690.0 



31.1 



849.3 



100.4 



9,878.2 8,928.5 



949.7 



27.7 



22.9 



14.6 



10.3 



6.1 



9.6 



xlii 



WORKERS' COMPENSATION APPEALS TRIBUNAL 
THIRD REPORT 

APPENDIX G 
PROFILE OF REPRESENTATION 



APPENDIX G 



EMPLOYER REPRESENTATION PROFILE 



Type of Representation 



No. of Cases Percentage 



No Representation 

Company Personnel 

Lawyer 

Other 

Office of the Employer Advisor 

Member of Parliament (MPP) 



1,274 44.1 

402 1.9 

467 16.2 

649 22.5 

95 3.3 





Total Cases Disposed at hearing 



2,887 



100.0 



WORKER REPRESENTATION PROFILE 



Type of Representation 



No. of Cases Percentage 



Union 


531 


18.4 


No Representation 


492 


17.0 


Lawyer 


660 


22.9 


Other 


474 


16.4 


Office of the Worker Advisor 


605 


21.0 


Member of Parliament (MPP) 


125 


4.3 



Total Cases Disposed at hearing 



2,887 



100.0 



* Information taken from released Tribunal decisions. 



This is a change from the Second Report where the information was taken from file records at the intalte stage. 
Experience indicates that the representation arrangements change over the course of the proceedings, so that this 
information at the beginning of the process is not an accurate indication of the actual representation at the hearing 
itself. 



xliii 



WORKERS' COMPENSATION APPEALS TRIBUNAL 
THIRD REPORT 

APPENDIX H 
WEEKLY WORKLOAD ANALYSIS 



APPENDIX H 
WEEKLY WORKLOAD ANALYSIS 
As At December 30th, 1988 



1. INTAKE 

- Not ready for TCO assignment: 

- Awaiting initial processing-no transmittal (Note 3) 70 

- Intake On hold (transmittal completed): 

Not ready for TCO - waiting period 47 

Not ready for TCO - worker not represented 31 78 

2. INTAKE PR(M:ESSING - CASE IN PROGRESS : 

Section 15 
Section 21 
Section 77 

Section 86o 







20 









Written Submissions 


7 




In Progress 


32 


39 


Written Submissions 







In Progress 


31 


31 



238 



TOTAL CASES IN INTAKE 

3. TCO PROCESSING: 

Awaiting assignment into counsel office (Note 8) 84 
CD and case preparation in progress (Note 4) 94 
TCO on hold 76 

TOTAL CASES ASSIGNED TO TCO 170 

TOTAL CASES IN TCO - PRE-HEARING 254 

4. HEARING READY CASES: 

Transmittal forms not sent to Scheduling (Note 1) 42 

5. SCHEDULING: 

On ho Id- 2 week waiting period 3 

Current: in progress 149 

Scheduled cases: 

JANUARY/88 (4 WEEKS) 110 

FEBRUARY/88 (4 WEEKS) 77 

MARCH/88 (5 WEEKS) 40 

APRIL/88 (4 WEEKS) 31 

MAY/88 (4 WEEKS) 16 

JUNE/88 (5 WEEKS) 12 



TOTAL SCHEDULED (Note 2) 286 

TOTAL IN SCHEDULING 438 

6. ** TOTAL ACTIVE PRE-HEARING WORKLOAD ** 972 

7. CASES ON HOLD (Note 6) 

Unschedulable cases in Scheduling (E) 113 

Pension cases not reviewed/reclassed 1 

Cases disposed/adjourned prior/at hearing (note 7) 4 
Dormant 22 140 



xliv 



APPENDIX H 

WEEKLY WORKLOAD ANALYSIS 
As at December 30th, 1988 

8. ** TOTAL PRE -HEARING WORKLOAD ** 1,112 

9. TOTAL POST-HEARING UORKLOAD: 

Cases pending decisions from Vice- Chairs 

: Final 269 

: Interim 1 

SUB -TOTAL 270 

Cases heard in which hearing status is on hold: 

Complete on hold 98 

Recessed 43 

No known status 3 

SUB-TOTAL 144 

** TOTAL POST-HEARIMG UORKLOAD ** 414 

10. POST DECISION CASES: 



** TOTAL POST DECISION CASES ** 
TOTAL CASES IN TRIBUNAL 



Clarification 







Ombudsman's Request 


79 




Reconsideration (Note 5) 


44 




Judicial Review 


6 




:ases ** 




129 
1,655 



xlv 



APPENDIX H 
WEEKLY WORKLOAD ANALYSIS 
As At December 30th, 1988 

Explanatory Notes: 



1. There are 42 cases indicated as hearing ready by TCO in which SCHEDULING has not received any 
transmittal forms. 

2. The total scheduled cases of 286 do not include the following: 

Reconvened Cases* 

January 1989 9 

February 1989 4 

March 1989 3 

April 1989 1 

May 1989 1 

June 1989 1 



TOTAL 19 

* These cases have already been included in the post-hearing workload under "RECESSED" and 

"COMPLETE/HOLD" hearings. 

* The figure also excludes cases with a tentative scheduled date. 

3. This figure indicates the number of cases in which the Intake Transmittal forms have not been 

forwarded to Data-Entry for processing from Intake. 

4. There are 35 cases in which the case description is indicated as "NO". 

5. 35 of the 44 active Reconsideration applications are pending review from the hearing panel. In 

addition, there are 5 applications that are not assigned to any panel. 

6. On hold (awaiting WCB review-Chronic Pain) is 269 cases. 

* This number includes the 27 chronic pain cases that have been 
reclassified as " 860-CP " by Intake. 

* This number excludes the chronic pain cases that have been assigned 
to TCO (7 cases) and 10 cases heard previously. 

The total number of cases identified as Pension - Chronic Pain is 286 cases in which 229 cases 
had been responded to by WCB as at week ending December 30th, 1988. 

7. This is a holding category for those cases which were adjourned or recessed at hearing by the 

hearing panel. There is a total of 7 "F-on hold" cases in which 3 recessed cases are already 
counted in the "RECESSED" category. 

8. 60 of these cases have been sorted by TCO. 



xlvi 



TRIBUNAL DAPPEL DES ACCIDENTS DU TRAVAIL 

TROISIEME RAPPORT 

1987 - 1988 



505 rue, University 
7^ etage 
Toronto, ONT. 
M5G 1X4 
(416) 598-4638 



TABLE DES MATIERES 

INTRODUCTION 1 

REMERCIEMENTS 1 

RESUME DU PRESIDENT 3 

LE RENDEMENT DU TRIBUNAL 3 

LES RETARDS AU STADE DE LA REDACTION DES DECISIONS 4 

TEMPS MOYEN DE TRAITEMENT COMPLET 4 

LES DEPENSES DU TRIBUNAL 5 

ENONCE DU MANDAT, DES OBJECTIFS ET DE LA PRISE D'ENGAGEMENTS 8 

LE RAPPORT DETAILLE 9 

A LA PERIODE VISEE PAR LE RAPPORT 9 
B CHANGEMENTS APPORTES A LA LISTE DES VICE-PRESIDENTS ET DES 

MEMBRES 9 

C LES RELATIONS ENTRE LE TRIBUNAL ET LA COMMISSION 10 

D QUI A LE DERNIER MOT -- UNE QUESTION ENCORE EN SUSPENS 10 

E LES RELATIONS ENTRE LE TRIBUNAL ET L'OMBUDSMAN 12 

F LES ASPECTS ADMINISTRATIFS 14 

1. Faits saillants 14 

2. Le systeme informatique 14 

3. Le systeme informatique de gestion de cas 15 

4. La dotation en personnel 16 

5. Le Service du courrier et le Service des dossiers et des documents 16 

6. Le Service de traitement de texte 16 

7. Le Service de reception des nouveaux dossiers 16 

8. Le Bureau des conseillers juridiques du Tribunal 17 

9. Inscription des audiences 18 

10. L'objectif de quatre mois 18 

11. Le Bureau du conseiller juridique du president 19 

12. Les audiences a I'exterieur de Toronto 19 

13. Representation aux audiences 19 
G LE CENTRE D'INFORMATION 19 

1. La bibliotheque 19 

2. Les publications 20 
H LA CHARGE DE TRAVAIL ET LA PRODUCTION 21 

1. La charge de travail 21 

2. La production du Tribunal 21 
I LE RAYONNEMENT ET LA FORMATION 22 
J LES SERVICES EN FRANQAIS 22 
K LES QUESTIONS DE FOND TRAITEES AU COURS DE LA PERIODE VISEE 23 

1. Evaluation des pensions 23 

2. Supplements de pension 23 

3. Maladie professionnelle 24 

4. Le stress professionnel 24 

5. Les problemes de delais 25 

6. Article 15 - Le droit d'intenter une action 25 

7. Autres 25 



LES QUESTIONS FINANCIERES 

1. Le Comite des finances et de Tadministration 

2. Preparation du budget de 1989 

3. Verifications 

4. Etats financiers des periodes allant du 1®"" avril 1987 au 30 mars 1988 et du 
1^' avril 1988 au 31 decembre 1988 



25 
25 
26 
26 

26 



ANNEXES 

ANNEXE A 
Enonce du mandat, des objectifs et de la prise d'engagements 



ANNEXE B 
Les membres du Tribunal 



VIII 



ANNEXE C 

Evolution des relations entre le Tribunal et la Commission 
Section 1: Directive de procedure n° 9 



XX 

XXVI 



ANNEXE D 
Statistiques sur la reception des nouveaux dossiers 



XXXII 



ANNEXE E 
Statistiques de production 



XXXV 



ANNEXE F 

Details budgetaires 



XXXIX 



ANNEXE G 
Profil des representants 



XLV 



ANNEXE H 
Analyse de la charge de travail hebdomadaire 



XLVI 



INTRODUCTION 

Le Tribunal d'appel des accidents du travail est un tribunal tripartite qui a ete constitue en 
octobre 1985 pour entendre et decider les appels des decisions de la Commission des accidents du 
travail (CAT). II s'agit d'un organisme autonome entierement distinct de la Commission. 

Le present rapport constitue le troisieme rapport annuel du president du Tribunal au ministre du 
Travail et aux divers groupes qui s'interessent au Tribunal. Dans ce rapport, comme dans les 
deux precedents, j'ai I'intention de rendre compte des progres realises par le Tribunal pendant la 
periode visee ainsi que des questions qui, a mon avis, sont susceptibles de retenir Tattention du 
ministre ou des groupes qui s'interessent au Tribunal. 

Le Premier rapport et le Deuxieme rapport visaient des periodes debutant a la date anniversaire de 
la creation du Tribunal (soit, du 1^"" octobre 1985 au 30 septembre 1986 et du l^'' octobre 1986 au 
30 septembre 1987). Nous projetions toutefois depuis le debut de faire coincider nos rapports 
annuels avec Texercice financier du Tribunal, et c'est avec le present rapport que nous metions ce 
projet a execution. 

Cette transition est d'autant plus compliquee que le Tribunal est en voie de modifier son exercice 
financier. A compter du 1^"^ Janvier 1989, nous passons de I'exercice regulier du gouvernement, 
qui va du P"" avril au 30 mars, a un exercice coincidant avec Tannee civile. (L'exercice du 
Tribunal correspondra ainsi a celui de la CAT - periode plus appropriee etant donne que le 
Tribunal est finance a meme la caisse des accidents de la CAT.) Le present rapport couvre la 
periode du I^'' octobre 1987 au 30 decembre 1988, soit une periode de 15 mois, afin de ne laisser 
aucun intervalle, mais les rapports suivants viseront des periodes correspondant a I'annee civile. 

Comme je I'ai mentionne dans les rapports precedents, le rapport annuel du Tribunal est le 
rapport du president, et non celui du Tribunal comme tel. J'entends notamment par la que le 
contenu subjectif du present rapport, comme celui des rapports anterieurs, n'a pas ete soumis a 
I'approbation de mes collegues. Je crois toutefois, comme dans le cas des deux premiers rapports, 
que les membres du Tribunal partagent, en grande partie, les opinions que j'y exprime. Lorsque 
ma conviction a cet egard n'est pas entiere, je prends soin de I'indiquer. 

Le present rapport est, en fait, le rapport personnel du president du Tribunal au ministre du 
Travail et aux divers groupes qui s'interessent au Tribunal parce que c'est au president et non au 
Tribunal comme tel que la Loi remet la responsabilite du fonctionnement de I'organisme. 

REMERCIEMENTS 

Le rendement du Tribunal continue, bien sur, a refleter le talent et la loyaute de ses vice- 
presidents, de ses membres et de son personnel. On a generalement tendance a sous-estimer la 
contribution des vice-presidents et des membres d'un tribunal administratif, alors qu'on attribue 
habituellement a son president un role dans le processus decisionnel plus important que ne 
I'indiquerait une evaluation realiste des limites que posent sa participation et son influence 
personnelles. Au cours de sa breve existence, le Tribunal d'appel a beneficie du talent et de la 
loyaute sans limites de ses vice-presidents, de ses representants des employeurs et des travailleurs 
et de son personnel. C'est a eux, avant tout, que le Tribunal doit le succes de ses realisations. 

Au chapitre des remerciements, il serait negligent de ma part de ne pas souligner la collaboration 
et I'aide constantes que le Tribunal et moi-meme avons regues du ministere du Travail, de son 
ministre et de leur personnel ainsi que du president et du personnel de la Commission des 
accidents du travail. 



La periode visee par ce rapport a ete marquee par plusieurs changements dans les rangs des cadres 
superieurs du Tribunal, et il convient de souligner la contribution exceptionnelle de trois 
personnes en particulier qui, apres avoir tenu une place preponderante lors de la creation du 
Tribunal, ont continue leur chemin en acceptant de nouvelles responsabilites. 

Le depart du premier president suppleant du Tribunal en avril 1988, James R. Thomas, a marque 
la fin d'une collaboration professionnelle qui a grandement contribue a lancer le Tribunal dans la 
bonne direction. Comme je I'ai mentionne dans les rapports anterieurs, M. Thomas a ete mon 
associe des le debut de cette entreprise. La nomination en juin 1988 de la nouvelle presidente 
suppleante, Laura Bradbury, qui etait au nombre des premiers vice-presidents du Tribunal, a 
marque le debut d'une collaboration qui s'annonce tout aussi fructueuse. 

David Starkman a ete le premier avocat-conseil du Tribunal. Apres avoir occupe ce poste 
pendant les trois premieres annees d'existence du Tribunal, il Ta quitte en septembre 1988 pour 
accepter un des postes de vice-president. Parmi les grandes realisations de M. Starkman a titre 
d'avocat-conseil, mentionnons qu'il a mis sur pied et assure le fonctionnement d'un concept 
nouveau et conteste, le Bureau des conseillers juridiques du Tribunal, qu'il a administre 
I'etablissement de relations fonctionnelles entre le Tribunal et les representants du patronat et des 
travailleurs et qu'il a fortement contribue au developpement de rapports harmonieux entre le 
personnel du Tribunal et celui de la Commission. M. Starkman a exerce une grande influence 
pendant la periode de formation du Tribunal. Elaine Newman, ancienne vice-presidente, lui a 
succede au poste d'avocat-conseil du Tribunal. 

Maureen Kenny, conseillere juridique du president depuis octobre 1985, a ete nommee a I'un des 
postes de vice-president du Tribunal en juillet 1987. En tant que conseillere juridique du 
president, M"^^ Kenny etait, entre autres, chargee d'administrer la procedure d'examen des 
ebauches de decisions (decrite dans le Premier rapport). Pendant les deux premieres annees 
d'existence du Tribunal, periode au cours de laquelle les questions epineuses ne faisaient jamais 
defaut, elle a su assumer, en toute matiere demandant un effort intellectuel, les roles de mentor et 
de redactrice aupres du president, des vice-presidents et des membres du Tribunal. Sa 
contribution aux normes de redaction des decisions a joue un grand role dans revolution du 
Tribunal. Carole Trethewey s'est jointe au Tribunal en janvier 1988 pour succeder a 
M""^ Kenny; c'est elle qui remplira dorenavant les fonctions de conseillere juridique du president, 
fonctions dont I'importance n'est plus a prouver. 



RESUME DU PRESIDENT 
LE RENDEMENT DU TRIBUNAL 

Je continue a souscrire a Topinion que j'exprimais dans le Deuxieme rapport au sujet de 
rimpartialite, de I'efficacite et de la pertinence du processus de decision du Tribunal de meme 
que de la qualite et de I'utilite des decisions qu'il rend. La structure tripartite du Tribunal, qui 
est toujours en force, continue a exercer une grande influence sur son fonctionnement. 

Dans le milieu patronal, cependant, on semble sans cesse se demander comment le Tribunal 
per9oit son mandat et ses rapports avec la CAT et si un tribunal d'appel externe constitue une 
entite vraiment viable dans le domaine de I'indemnisation des travailleurs accidentes. En ce qui 
concerne la viabilite d'un tribunal d'appel externe, il semble possible, avec tout le respect qui se 
doit, de resumer la preoccupation du patronat en disant qu'il se demande si le systeme peut se 
permettre financierement de legiferer I'indemnisation compte tenu du fait qu'elle doit relever au 
depart d'une application vraiment objective de la Loi. 

Par ailleurs, a mesure que la proportion d'appels accueillis diminue - selon les rapports de la 
Commission -, on sent que les travailleurs commencent a se demander si le Tribunal d'appel ne 
penche pas - peut-etre a son insu - du cote de la Commission et du systeme d'indemnisation. 

II n'y a rien d'etonnant au fait que I'experience m'a jusqu'a maintenant confirme que tout systeme 
d'indemnisation des travailleurs accidentes doit, dans notre societe, etre guide par la primaute du 
droit pour etre approprie en principe et etre, a long terme, acceptable en pratique. Je crois que 
I'experience du Tribunal d'appel a demontre qu'un tribunal d'appel externe represente une 
condition prealable essentielle a cet effet. 

Je demeure confiant que le Tribunal d'appel et la CAT continueront a entretenir des rapports de 
plus en plus constructifs, qui aboutiront, au terme de la presente phase de developpement, a une 
relation ponderee et durable. 

Quant a la possibilite d'une tendance au rapprochement, chacun sait qu'elle represente en soi un 
risque pour tout organisme de supervision. Dans le systeme d'indemnisation des travailleurs 
accidentes, le Tribunal court aussi le risque de se laisser influencer par les travailleurs ou les 
employeurs. Pour se premunir contre toute tendance en ce sens, le Tribunal ne peut done que 
rappeler constamment a ses membres les dangers auxquels ils sont exposes en raison de la place 
qu'ils occupent dans le systeme. 

La diminution de la proportion d'appels accueillis constitue, a mon avis, le resultat previsible de 
I'influence qu'un tribunal d'appel externe exerce sur le processus de decision de la Commission. 
Sans porter aucun jugement sur I'ancienne administration de la CAT, il faut reconnaitre que la 
creation d'une instance d'appel externe, grace a laquelle les decisions des arbitres de la 
Commission sont reexaminees publiquement de fa?on courante par des specialistes experimentes 
de I'exterieur, devait entrainer une amelioration des modalites d'examen et - de la - des decisions 
rendues par la Commission. La preuve la plus evidente de ce phenomene est I'amelioration de la 
qualite des justifications ecrites des decisions rendues par les commissaires d'audience, 
amelioration qu'on ne peut s'empecher de remarquer de plus en plus frequemment au Tribunal. 
La presence d'un tribunal d'appel externe a aussi une influence naturelle sur I'attention que la 
Commission apporte a s'assurer que les exigences de la Loi sont bien representees dans ses 
nouvelles politiques. 

Les statistiques de la Commission indiquent que, dans les cas relatifs a I'admissibilite a des 
indemnites et a leur montant, les appels accueillis ne relevent de plus en plus que de divergences 
dans les conclusions de faits. Assez peu frequents, les appels accueillis mettant en cause 
differentes interpretations du droit ou des principes directeurs sont de I'ordre de 10 pour cent 
seulement. 



La proportion des decisions du Tribunal relevant de divergences portant sur des questions de 
droit ou de principes directeurs continuera a diminuer au fur et a mesure que le Tribunal et la 
Commission en viendront de plus en plus a percevoir les questions de droit sous un meme angle - 
grace a I'examen public, rationnel et continu auquel le systeme encourage maintenant le Tribunal 
et la Commission a proceder, et non en raison d'une influence quelconque exercee sur le Tribunal 
par la Commission (ou vice-versa). De plus en plus, la proportion d'appels accueillis dans les cas 
litigieux ne refletera que la tendance fondamentale des commissaires d'audience uniques et des 
jurys d'audience tripartites du Tribunal (qui disposent souvent de preuves plus elaborees) a 
interpreter differemment les faits d'ordre medical ou autre. 

Les tendances qui ressortent des donnees de la Commission me portent a croire que la proportion 
d'appels accueillis relatifs a I'admissibilite a des indemnites et a leur montant finira par se 
stabiliser aux alentours de 30 a 35 pour cent. 

LES RETARDS AU STADE DE LA REDACTION DES DECISIONS 

II me fait plaisir d'annoncer que les retards au stade posterieur a I'audience - consequence tenace 
de la periode de rodage du Tribunal sur laquelle je me suis longuement attarde dans le Deuxieme 
rapport - ne posent plus de problemes. 

A la fin de I'annee 1988, le Tribunal avait rendu 781 decisions. Le temps moyen de traitement de 
ces decisions, a partir du moment ou la decision etait prete pour la redaction jusqu'a la date de 
son emission, etait de 69 jours (2,3 mois). Cette periode comprend les cas dont les jurys etaient 
presides soit par des vice-presidents a plein temps, soit par des vice-presidents a temps partiel. 
Si Ton ne tient compte que des decisions de jurys presides par des vice-presidents a plein temps, 
le temps moyen ecoule avant remission de la decision tombe a 50 jours (1,7 mois). Pour des 
raisons administratives, la redaction de decisions par les vice-presidents a temps partiel prend 
toujours un peu plus de temps. 

Dans mes remarques preliminaires lors de la troisieme presentation annuelle du Tribunal au 
Comite permanent du developpement des ressources de I'Assemblee legislative (le 26 mai 1988, 
compte rendu dans Hansard, vol. R-8, p. R-183), j'ai parle longuement du probleme des retards 
dans remission des decisions apres I'audience. Je faisais surtout reference alors a un certain 
nombre d'anciens cas en souffrance pour lesquels le Tribunal avait de la difficulte a terminer la 
redaction des decisions. A ce moment-la, il y avait environ 100 cas dans cette categorie. A la fin 
de la periode visee par le present rapport, seulement huit decisions n'avaient pas encore ete 
rendues. 

Le fait que le nombre de cas actuellement au stade de la redaction des decisions soit passe de 525 
(en octobre 1987) a 270 (en decembre 1988) constitue un indice important de la diminution 
considerable du temps de prise de decision partout au Tribunal depuis la publication du 
Deuxieme rapport. 



TEMPS MOYEN DE TRAITEMENT COMPLET 

Le patronat et les travailleurs continuent a se preoccuper du temps que prennent generalement les 
cas pour traverser toutes les etapes du processus de decision du Tribunal - du depot de I'appel a 
remission de la decision apres I'audience. Le ministre du Travail tient particulierement a ce que 
toutes les mesures possibles soient prises pour diminuer le temps moyen de traitement. 

Le Tribunal a naturellement surveille de pres la question du temps de traitement, et, en 
juin 1988, j'ai ete en mesure de rassurer le ministre en lui indiquant que je croyais qu'il etait 
desormais possible pour le Tribunal de reorganiser ses procedures et, en particulier, celles du 



stade prealable a Taudience de maniere a reduire a quatre mois son temps moyen de traitement 
complet, sans nuire a I'efficacite du processus judiciaire ou a la qualite de ses decisions. 

La restructuration des procedures du Tribunal, en vue de parvenir a un temps moyen de 
traitement de quatre mois, a ete quelque peu retardee par les changements survenus dans les rangs 
des cadres superieurs du Tribunal, mais elle est maintenant en cours d'execution. Voici un 
resume de la restructuration qui a ete mise en oeuvre ou, du moins, approuvee a la fin de la 
periode visee par ce rapport: 

1. Les appels ne sont traites que lorsque les representants ont confirme qu'ils sont prets a 
commencer la procedure de traitement et que tous les aspects administratifs ont ete couverts dans 
les formulaires de demande d'appel. 

2. Les descriptions de cas sont preparees par le Bureau des conseillers juridiques du Tribunal 
(BCJT), a partir d'un modele simplifie, des le debut du traitement. Lorsqu'il est necessaire que le 
BCJT fasse des preparatifs ou des remaniements additionnels, ceux-ci sont effectues apres avoir 
complete la description de cas. Si c'est le cas, la description de cas est accompagnee des addenda 
appropries. 

3. On inscrit la date de I'audience au calendrier des audiences des remission de la description de 
cas. S'il s'avere necessaire d'effectuer d'autres preparatifs ou remaniements, ils doivent etre faits 
avant la date fixee pour I'audience. 

4. Les audiences qui se tiennent a Toronto sont planifiees en dedans de six semaines apres 
reception de la description de cas par les parties. Si les parties ne peuvent pas se mettre d'accord 
sur une date d'audience, c'est notre service d'inscription des audiences qui est charge d'en fixer 
une. 

5. On prevoit etre en mesure d'emettre les decisions dans les six semaines qui suivent la date de 
I'audience ou les six semaines suivant la reception des preuves et observations apres audience. 
Ces previsions ne seront pas toujours realistes, mais il faudra fournir des explications valables 
pour depasser de trop loin la date limite fixee. 

A la fin de la periode visee par ce rapport, les personnes qui en appellent de decisions rendues 
pour des cas relatifs a I'admissibilite a des indemnites et a leur montant, ne necessitant pas le 
reglement de questions complexes ou nouvelles et n'exigeant pas d'enquetes supplementaires, 
medicales ou autres, peuvent s'attendre a obtenir une audience a Toronto dans les deux mois et 
demi qui suivent la reception du formulaire de demande et a recevoir une decision en dedans 
d'un mois a un mois et demi apres audition de leur appel, a condition qu'elles soient elles-memes 
pretes a participer au processus sans delai. D'une maniere generale, les appels relevant de I'article 
77 et de I'article 21 peuvent desormais etre entendus et regies en dedans de trois a quatre 
semaines. 

Ces previsions s'appliquent seulement aux audiences tenues a Toronto. Le calendrier des 
audiences tenues a I'exterieur de Toronto prevoit habituellement des dates d'audience plus 
espacees etant donne qu'il est impossible de tenir des audiences quotidiennes a I'exterieur. 

II est trop tot pour affirmer avec certitude qu'il sera possible de reduire a quatre mois le temps 
moyen de traitement complet de tous les cas entendus a Toronto, mais le progres accompli en ce 
sens est indeniable. 

LES DEFENSES DU TRIBUNAL 

On se demande bien sur continuellement, surtout du cote du patronat, a combien se chiffrent les 
couts de fonctionnement du Tribunal et si la direction de cet organisme exerce un controle 



financier adequat. II etait difficile de repondre a ces preoccupations pendant les premieres 
annees d'existence du Tribunal et, jusqu'a present, nous n'avons pu le faire que par I'entremise de 
nos etats financiers et de nos budgets, 

Toutefois, le Tribunal croit etre parvenu au terme de sa periode de developpement au cours de la 
periode visee par ce rapport. II a atteint un stade de maturite et il est juste de reconnaitre qu'il a 
trouve son rythme operationnel quant a Telaboration de ses budgets et au controle de ses 
depenses. Le budget de fonctionnement de Texercice 1988-1989 (soumis au ministre du Travail 
en decembre 1987) constitue un budget de base qui devrait, dans Tensemble, etre considere 
comme suffisant pour remplir les attributions legales qui incombent actuellement au Tribunal. 

Voici comment j'exposais la situation aux presidents des comites permanents et aux chefs de 
services du Tribunal dans un memoire date d'avril 1988: 

Alors que nous nous preparons a dresser le budget de Vannee civile 1989, nous sommes 
parvenus a un stade auquel il semble pour le moins judicieux, sur le plan financier, de 
supposer que le Tribunal a atteint son rythme operationnel et que le budget de 
I'exercice ] 988- 1989 constitue un budget de base qui devrait, dans I'ensemble, lui suffire 
pour remplir ses attributions. 

Une telle supposition se revelera peut-etre prematuree. Toutefois, je crois, tout comme le 
Comite des finances et de i administration et le Comite de direction, que nous sommes 
parvenus au stade oil nous devons fixer des limites et commencer a gerer la croissance de 
nos besoins financiers a I'instar d'un organisme operationnel plutot qua celui d'un organisme 
experimental, sans quoi nous risquons de prendre nos desirs pour des besoins. 

Le Tribunal a aussi profite de I'occasion que lui off rait I'elaboration du budget de 1989 pour 
proceder a un examen minutieux de ses besoins financiers. II semble que le moment soit venu de 
fournir un compte rendu de la gestion financiere du Tribunal pendant sa periode de 
developpement qui serait plus a la mesure du grand public. 

Pendant sa periode de developpement, le Tribunal a traverse trois etapes majeures. La premiere, 
qui remonte a I'ete 1985, lorsque j'etais president temporaire, a donne lieu a la formulation 
theorique de la raison d'etre du Tribunal. Cette formulation ne reposait que sur des suppositions 
au sujet de toutes les variables de fonctionnement - charge de travail, temps de preparation, 
duree des audiences, periode necessaire a la redaction des decisions, etc. II n'existait aucunes 
donnees concretes sur ces facteurs determinants les couts, et aucunes ne seraient disponibles tant 
que le Tribunal ne serait pas entre en fonction. Les problemes etaient d'autant plus nombreux 
qu'il s'agissait d'etablir un modele judiciaire tout nouveau, jamais mis a I'essai. (II en etait ainsi 
en raison du caractere sans precedent des attributions judiciaires du Tribunal telles que prescrites 
par la Loi et dictees par le systeme d'indemnisation des travailleurs en Ontario, en 1985.) 

Le stade experimental du developpement du Tribunal a debute en octobre 1985, lorsqu'il a fait 
ses debuts. Le president et le president suppleant sont entres en fonction a plein temps le 
1^"" octobre 1985, et la nomination par decret des premiers vice-presidents et des membres des 
jurys a suivi peu apres. L'embauche et la formation du personnel ainsi que la commande des 
fournitures et du materiel ont debute, a toutes fins pratiques, le 1^"" octobre. Le Tribunal a tenu 
sa premiere audience en novembre 1985 et a rendu sa premiere decision le 9 decembre 1985. 
Quelques audiences ont suivi en decembre de la meme annee, et leur nombre a augmente au fil 
des mois. En septembre 1986, au moment de la deuxieme serie de nominations par decret, le 
Tribunal est parvenu au terme de son stade experimental et est vraiment entre dans le vif des 
operations. 

Au stade experimental, il a constamment fallu rectifier le processus de decision et I'organisation 
des services de soutien en fonction de I'experience acquise. 



Vers le mois d'octobre 1986, le Tribunal a amorce une periode qu'on pourrait appeler stade de 
mise a I'essai. Nous avions finalement etabli les bases judiciaires et administratives du Tribunal 
et nous pouvions commencer a en mettre les fondements a I'essai. 

Cette phase d'essai nous a permis de reperer des lacunes dans les ressources affectees a certains 
secteurs du Tribunal et d'en combler une partie; nombres des mesures correctives prises a ce 
moment-la ont ete traitees dans le budget de I'exercice 1988-1989, depose en decembre 1987. 
Permettez-moi de repeter que nous croyons juste de reconnaitre que, vers le mois d'avril 1988, 
soit environ deux ans et demi apres sa creation, le Tribunal a emerge de son stade de mise a 
I'essai et a trouve son rythme operationnel. 

Ma seule reserve a cet egard concerne les systemes informatiques du Tribunal. Notre systeme 
informatique, et surtout notre systeme de gestion de cas, en sont encore au stade experimental. 
Nous serons bientot en mesure de prendre une decision au sujet des ameliorations a apporter a ces 
systemes ainsi que de I'utilisation future des ordinateurs au Tribunal. Cette decision, qui aura des 
repercussions considerables sur les couts d'immobilisation, doit etre prise avant que le Tribunal ne 
puisse mener a bonne fin le developpement de ses structures et de son systeme informatique. 

Comme le savent maintenant la plupart des gens, le Tribunal est finance a meme la caisse des 
accidents de la CAT. Cependant, afin que le Tribunal demeure parfaitement independant de la 
CAT, celle-ci n'a aucune responsabilite dans I'approbation des budgets du Tribunal. Dans le 
protocole d'entente passe avec le ministre du Travail, le president du Tribunal s'est engage a 
soumettre les budgets du Tribunal a I'approbation du ministre. 

Le premier budget du Tribunal portait sur la periode de six mois allant du 1®"" octobre 1985 au 

30 mars 1986 - fin de I'exercice du gouvernement. Les couts de fonctionnement budgetes (je ne 
ferai mention que des coQts de fonctionnement, pour ensuite presenter les couts d'immobilisation) 
pour cette premiere periode de six mois qui, compte tenu des circonstances, ne reposaient que sur 
une serie de conjectures, etaient de 3,68 millions de dollars, et les depenses reelles de 
fonctionnement se sont elevees a 1,24 millions de dollars. 

Le deuxieme budget, soit celui de la periode allant du l®*" avril 1986 au 30 mars 1987, que nous 
avons soumis en Janvier 1986, alors que nous avions une experience pratique encore rudimentaire 
du fonctionnement du Tribunal, s'elevait a 7,69 millions de dollars. Les depenses reelles de 
fonctionnement se sont elevees a 5,71 millions de dollars pendant ladite periode. 

Le troisieme budget, que nous avons prepare au mois de novembre 1986 - seulement quatre mois 
apres le debut du stade de mise a I'essai - visait I'exercice allant du l^^ avril 1987 au 

31 mars 1988. II prevoyait des depenses de fonctionnement de 8,23 millions de dollars, et les 
depenses reelles se sont elevees a 7,38 millions de dollars. 

C'est done dire qu'il a fallu attendre jusqu'a la preparation du budget de I'exercice 1988-1989, en 
decembre 1987, pour se prevaloir d'une experience pratique reelle du fonctionnement du 
Tribunal. Ce budget, qui visait la periode du 1^"" avril 1988 au 31 mars 1989, prevoyait des 
depenses de fonctionnement de 8,38 millions de dollars. Comme I'indiquent les rapports 
financiers presentes plus loin, ce n'est qu'une fois la moitie de I'exercice 1988-1989 ecoulee que 
nous avons decide de faire coincider I'exercice du Tribunal avec I'annee civile. Le budget de 
I'exercice 1988-1989 a done ete modifie afin de ne porter que sur la periode de neuf mois allant 
du 1^"" avril 1988 au 31 decembre 1988. Distribuees au prorata les depenses de fonctionnement 
budgetees pour cette periode etaient de 6,28 millions de dollars, et les depenses reelles se sont 
elevees a 5,98 millions de dollars. 

Les depenses d'immobilisation se sont chiffrees a 2,42 millions de dollars du 1®"" octobre 1985 a la 
fin de la periode visee par le present rapport. 



ENONCE DU MANDAT, DES OBJECTIFS ET DE LA PRISE D'ENGAGEMENTS 

L'etude speciale du budget que le Tribunal a entreprise lors de la preparation du budget de 
I'annee civile 1989 lui a permis de passer en revue son mandat, ses objectifs et sa prise 
d'engagements. Cet exercice a donne lieu a la formulation d'un enonce de mandat, d'objectifs et 
de prise d'engagements en bonne et due forme, que le Tribunal a adopte le 1^"^ octobre 1988, lors 
de son troisieme anniversaire. Cet enonce, dont le libelle a ete etabli avec grand soin, explique le 
mandat fondamental du Tribunal, tel qu'il le pergoit en s'appuyant sur ses trois ans d'experience 
pratique. II s'agit, si vous voulez, de la charte des obligations et des objectifs du Tribunal 
d'appel. 

L'enonce approuve se trouve a V Annexe A. 



LE RAPPORT DETAILLE 



A LA PERIODE VISEE PAR LE RAPPORT 

Le present rapport vise la periode de quinze mois allant du l^"" octobre 1987 au 31 decembre 1988. 
Les motifs de la prolongation de la periode visee sont expliques dans I'lntroduction. 

B CHANGEMENTS APPORTES A LA LISTE DES VICE-PRESIDENTS ET DES MEMBRES 

Au cours de cette periode, divers changements ont ete apportes a la liste des vice-presidents et 
des membres representant les travailleurs et les employeurs. En plus des changements mentionnes 
a V Annexe B, il faut signaler une certain nombre d'autres changements. 

Quatre nouveaux vice-presidents a plein temps ont ete nommes au cours de la periode en 
question. Pour Tun d'entre eux, il s'agissait de combler un nouveau poste; les trois autres ont ete 
nommes pour combler les postes que la demission de leurs titulaires avail laisses vacants. 

Le nouveau poste de vice-president avait ete prevu dans le Deuxieme rapport. Dans ce rapport, 
je disais que le budget du Tribunal pour 1986-1987 prevoyait la creation possible de deux postes 
supplementaires de vice-president a plein temps et que I'un d'entre eux avait ete comble en aout 
1987. Vers la fin de I'annee 1987, la necessite de combler le second poste ne faisait plus aucun 
doute. 

Les trois vacances ont ete creees par la nomination de Kathleen O'Neil a la Commission des 
relations du travail de I'Ontario, la demission de Jim Thomas, qui a accepte un poste de cadre 
superieur au sein du gouvernement de I'Ontario, et la demission d'Elaine Newman, qui a accepte 
la nomination d'avocat-conseil du Tribunal lorsque David Starkman a quitte ce poste. 

Jean Guy Bigras, qui avait d'abord ete nomme vice-president a temps partiel le 14 mai 1986, a 
accepte, le 17 decembre 1987, le second poste de vice-president a plein temps, nouvellement cree. 

John Moore, qui avait d'abord ete nomme vice-president a temps partiel le 16 juillet 1986, a 
accepte une nomination a plein temps le l^'' mai 1988; David Starkman, qui etait I'avocat-conseil 
du Tribunal, a ete nomme vice-president, le P"" aout 1988, pour remplacer Laura Bradbury qui 
est devenue presidente suppleante apres le depart de Jim Thomas; Zeynep Onen, anciennement 
avocate principale au Bureau des conseillers juridiques du Tribunal, a ete nommee au poste de 
vice-presidente laisse vacant par Elaine Newman, le 1^"^ octobre 1988. 

Avec la nomination d'un deuxieme nouveau vice-president, le nombre total des vice-presidents a 
plein temps du Tribunal est passe a dix (ce nombre inclut la presidente suppleante qui est aussi 
vice-presidente). 

Parmi les postes de membres a plein temps representant les employeurs et les travailleurs, on a 
assiste a quatre changements. Frances Lankin, qui etait membre a plein temps representant les 
travailleurs, a accepte un poste a plein temps avec le S.E.F.P.O. et a ete nommee membre a temps 
partiel representant les travailleurs le 25 fevrier 1988. La vacance au poste de membre a plein 
temps representant les travailleurs creee par ce changement nous a conduits a la nomination, le 1 1 
juin 1988, de Ray Lebert qui, avant cette nomination, etait le secretaire-tresorier de I'Association 
des travailleurs canadiens de I'automobile, section locale 444, poste qui lui a permis d'affirmer 
son experience dans le domaine des accidents du travail. David Mason, qui a pris sa retraite le 30 
septembre 1988, a laisse vacant un poste de membre a plein temps representant les employeurs, 
poste comble par Martin Meslin qui est devenu membre a plein temps representant les employeurs 



Au cours de cette periode, la liste des nominations a temps partiel a subi quelques modifications. 
Marsha Faubert, Karl Friedmann et Joy McGrath ont ete nommes vice-presidents a temps partiel. 
Mark Cabinet, Sara Sutherland, Gerry Nipshagen et Allen Merritt ont ete nommes membres a 
temps partiel representant les employeurs. Comme on I'a indique plus haut, Frances Lankin a ete 
nommee membre a temps partiel representant les travailleurs. 

Une liste de tous les vice-presidents et membres actifs du Tribunal accompagnee d'une courte 
description de I'experience de chacun se trouve a V Annexe B de ce rapport. 

C LES RELATIONS ENTRE LE TRIBUNAL ET LA COMMISSION 

Les relations entre la CAT et le Tribunal ont continue a evoluer pendant la periode visee par le 
present rapport. Les deux organismes continuent a entretenir des rapports de collaboration 
harmonieux, en depit des defis poses par un certain nombre de questions de fond concernant 
rindemnisation qui les ont de temps en temps mis a I'epreuve. II est important de relater ces 
interactions afin de mettre en lumiere I'orientation des relations entre les deux organismes. De 
plus, etant donne qu'elles sont d'une importance extreme pour le systeme d'appel, j'ai cru qu'il 
serait bon d'en faire un compte rendu complet, compte rendu que j'ai place en annexe {Annexe C) 
en raison de sa longueur. Les lecteurs qui s'interessent a la question pourront se reporter a cette 
annexe et les autres pourront en oublier jusqu'a I'existence. 

D QUI A LE DERNIER MOT -- UNE QUESTION ENCORE EN SUSPENS 

A la fin de la periode visee par le Deuxieme rapport, on ne savait toujours pas qui, du conseil 
d'administration de la CAT ou du Tribunal, a le dernier mot dans les debats portant sur des 
questions de droit general ou de principes directeurs, en vertu du paragraphe 86n de la Loi. 
Comme le Tribunal n'avait pas eu I'occasion d'interpreter le libelle de ce paragraphe, cet aspect 
critique de la legislation n'avait pas encore ete resolu. 

II semblait toutefois qu'une telle occasion se presenterait bientot grace a I'examen de la 
Decision n° 72 (21 juillet 1986) du Tribunal, auquel procedait le conseil d'administration de la 
Commission. 

Dans la Decision n° 72, le Tribunal a juge qu'une lesion soudaine et inattendue - comme une 
protrusion discale - survenant pendant le cours normal des taches coutumieres d'un travailleur 
constitue une lesion corporelle causee par un evenement fortuit aux termes de la Loi sur les 
accidents du travail. Ladite decision est conforme a la jurisprudence anglaise et canadienne selon 
laquelle le terme "evenement fortuit" peut referer a une cause ou a un resultat inattendu. 
La Decision n° 72 a souleve de vives controverses chez le patronat en Ontario, et il s'agissait du 
premier cas que le conseil d'administration de la CAT decidait d'examiner en vertu des 
dispositions du paragraphe 86n. 

Dans la decision resultant de I'examen, qui a paru le 28 septembre 1988, la majorite des membres 
du conseil d'administration a conclu que le Tribunal avait mal interprete la jurisprudence. 
Relevant certaines differences entre le libelle de la Loi sur les accidents du travail de I'Gntario et 
la legislation examinee par la Cour supreme du Canada, la Cour d'appel et la Chambre des Lords 
pour rendre certaines des decisions sur lesquelles le Tribunal s'appuyait dans ses conclusions, la 
Commission a conclu que lesdites decisions etaient vraiment distinctes et qu'elles ne s'appliquaient 
pas a la loi de TOntario. 

Une des differences auxquelles la decision du conseil d'administration faisait reference porte sur 
I'element "incapacity" ajoute en 1965 a la definition du terme "accident" dans la loi de I'Ontario. 
Ladite definition ne comportait auparavant que les elements "evenement fortuit" et "inconduite 
volontaire" (de quelqu'un d'autre que le travailleur). La modification apportee a la Loi en 1965 a 

10 



elargi la definition pour qu'il soit clair que les lesions survenant du fait et au cours de Temploi 
sont indemnisables, qu'un accident a caractere fortuit soit ou non survenu. 

De prime abord, il importerait done peu qu'une lesion soit causee par un accident a caractere 
fortuit ou par un accident du type "incapacite". Les deux feraient partie des "lesions par accident" 
aux termes du paragraphe 3(1). Dans la pratique, il est toutefois important de determiner si les 
lesions soudaines et inattendues non attribuables a des evenements fortuits externes sont reliees a 
un evenement fortuit ou a une incapacite selon la definition du terme "accident". II est en effet 
important de le determiner parce que le travailleur peut se prevaloir de la presomption legislative 
en vertu de laquelle une lesion reliee a une incapacite est reputee, sauf preuve du contraire, etre 
survenue du fait de I'emploi si elle survient au cours de I'emploi. Cette clause de presomption 
(paragraphe 3(3)) ne s'applique pas aux cas de lesions reliees a I'element "incapacite" de la 
definition. Dans la Decision n° 72, le jury d'audience avait conclu que la lesion de la travailleuse 
etait survenue du fait de son emploi en se fondant sur la clause de presomption. 

II est important de connaitre tous les details relatifs a la Decision n° 72 afin de comprendre les 
evenements qui ont suivi la decision qu'a rendue le conseil d'administration apres I'avoir 
examinee en vertu du paragraphe 86n. 

Un aspect particulier de la decision en question etait pour le moins surprenant. Apres avoir 
conclu que le Tribunal avait mal interprete la definition du terme "accident" relativement a son 
application dans les cas de lesions soudaines non associees a des evenements fortuits externes, le 
conseil d'administration n'a pas ordonne au Tribunal de reexaminer le cas en question, comme le 
prevoit le paragraphe 86n. 

Le conseil d'administration a explique qu'il n'ordonnait pas de reexamen dans les circonstances 
parce que la travailleuse concernee avait ete victime d'une procedure longue et complexe ayant 
principalement pour but d'etablir un principe fondamental pour le systeme d'indemnisation en 
general et non ses droits personnels. Le conseil d'administration a estime qu'il aurait ete mal a 
propos de prolonger la periode d'anxiete a laquelle la travailleuse avait deja ete soumise en 
ordonnant au Tribunal de reexaminer sa decision. Le conseil a done ordonne que les indemnites 
soient imputees au Fonds de garantie pour travailleurs reintegres, au lieu d'etre imputees au 
compte de I'employeur. 

Malgre que le conseil d'administration a decide de ne pas ordonner au Tribunal de reexaminer la 
Decision n° 72, le personnel de la Commission a estime que la decision prise par la majorite du 
conseil a I'egard de I'interpretation sur laquelle etait fondee ladite decision devrait des lors dieter 
les decisions de la Commisssion dans les cas semblables a venir et qu'il devrait en etre ainsi des 
decisions du Tribunal. Le conseil d'administration n'avait toutefois pas precise quel effet aurait 
sa decision sur les cas a venir. 

En deeidant de ne pas lui ordonner de reexaminer la Decision n° 72, la Commission a prive le 
Tribunal d'une occasion de determiner, dans ce cas, a qui I'alinea 86n(l) donne le dernier mot 
dans les debats portant sur des questions de droit general et de principes directeurs. Par contre, 
le personnel de la Commission avait mis simultanement en branle le processus de decision de la 
Commission en prenant pour acquis que le dernier mot revenait a son conseil d'administration aux 
termes dudit alinea. 

Compte tenu des circonstances, j'etais, en ma qualite de president du Tribunal, preoccupe par le 
fait que le public devait etre informe des questions que soulevait la decision de la Commission et 
qui, aux yeux du Tribunal, etaient encore en suspens, en prevision des cas a venir portant sur des 
lesions soudaines et inattendues non attribuables a des evenements fortuits externes pour lesquels 
la mise en application de la clause de presomption pourrait jouer un role determinant. Je voulais 
aussi que les travailleurs et le patronat aient I'occasion de faire connaitre leur position a I'egard de 
ces questions aux jurys qui seraient appeles a examiner de tels cas. 



11 



J'ai done ecrit au president de la Commission et fait parvenir copie de la lettre a toutes les parties 
et a tous les membres du conseil d'administration qui avaient participe a I'examen de la 
Decision n° 72 en vertu du paragraphe 86n. Dans cette lettre, j'ai indique les questions que je 
considerais comme etant encore en suspens et j'ai invite les destinataires a me faire parvenir leurs 
observations ecrites, en precisant que toute observation reque serait transmise aux jurys saisis de 
cas dans lesquels ces questions se poseraient. 

Voici comment j'ai expose les questions en suspens dans cette lettre: 

1. La decision qu'a rendue le conseil d'administration de la Commission a la suite de I'examen de 
la signification de I'expression "lesion corporelle par accident" donnee dans la Decision n° 72, qu'il 
a effectue en vertu du paragraphe 86n, differe de celle du Tribunal a cet egard. Par consequent, 
la decision de la Commission aurait-elle automatiquement eu force executoire sur le Tribunal 
dans le cas de la Decision n° 72 si la Commission lui avait, comme le prevoit I'alinea 86n(l), 
ordonne de reexaminer ladite decision? 

2. Si la decision de la Commission avait eu force executoire sur le Tribunal dans le cas de la 
Decision n° 72, en aurait-il ete de meme pour les cas ulterieurs de meme nature? 

3. La reponse a la question n° 2 aurait-elle ete differente si le conseil d'administration avait 
ordonne au Tribunal de reexaminer la Decision n° 721 

4. Si la reponse aux questions n°^ 1 et 2 est negative, quelle est I'obligation du Tribunal a I'egard 
des decisions que rend le conseil d'administration au sujet de questions de droit general ou de 
principes directeurs a la suite d'examens en vertu du paragraphe 86n: dans le cas faisant I'objet de 
I'examen? dans les cas ulterieurs de meme nature? 

A la fin de la periode visee par le present rapport, le Tribunal n'avait pas encore eu a examiner 
de cas necessitant la resolution des questions qui precedent. II avait toutefois regu de nombreuses 
observations ecrites en reponse a la lettre du president susmentionnee. La plupart des auteurs de 
ces observations refusaient pour le moment de se prononcer et demandaient qu'on leur donne a 
nouveau I'occasion de le faire lorsqu'un cas approprie se presenterait. 

Tout ceci pour conclure que nous sommes done parvenus a la fin de la periode visee par le 
Troisieme rapport, a I'aube de notre quatrieme annee d'existence, sans que cette question-cle 
soulevee par le paragraphe 86n n'ait ete resolue. 

E LES RELATIONS ENTRE LE TRIBUNAL ET L'OMBUDSMAN 

Pendant la periode visee par ce rapport, I'ombudsman nous a fait part de 1 13 plaintes dont il 
avait ete saisi au sujet de decisions du Tribunal. Ces plaintes portaient, presque sans exception, 
sur le bien-fonde des decisions rendues. A la fin de la meme periode, I'ombudsman avait termine 
son enquete pour 37 de ces plaintes et, sauf dans un cas, avait conclu que les decisions du 
Tribunal ne pouvaient etre qualifiees de deraisonnables. On trouvera ci-apres un compte rendu 
de la situation dans le cas du rapport defavorable. 

Comme je I'avais indique dans le Deuxieme rapport, j'ai, en tant que president du Tribunal, de la 
difficulty a accepter les implications que peut avoir sur un tribunal judiciaire I'examen du bien- 
fonde de ses decisions par 1 ombudsman. C'est une difficulte, je dois le preciser, qui n'est pas 
ressentie par la totalite des membres du Tribunal bien qu'elle semble toutefois en preoccuper la 
majorite. Ces problemes de concept ont incite le Tribunal a peser avec soin ses reponses lors de 
communications avec I'ombudsman lorsque celles-ci concernaient des plaintes sur le bien-fonde 
de ses decisions. 



12 



Dans le cadre des enquetes menees pour verifier le bien-fonde des decisions rendues par le 
Tribunal, les relations entre le Tribunal et Tombudsman ont evidemment ete assez simples, tant 
que les plaintes ont ete jugees sans fondement. Dans de tels cas, le Tribunal a coUabore en 
fournissant des copies de ses dossiers. Par principe toutefois, lorsque Tombudsman lui demandait 
de fournir une premiere reponse a I'egard d'une plainte portant sur le bien-fonde d'une decision, 
le Tribunal a invariablement repondu aux requetes de routine de ce dernier en le renvoyant aux 
justifications ecrites du jury d'audience contenues dans la decision rendue. 

Evidemment, les relations ont pris une tournure plus complexe dans le cas de la plainte que 
I'ombudsman a juge bon d'appuyer a la suite de son enquete. 

Quel que soit le cas, des que le bien-fonde d'une plainte a ete etabli lors d'une enquete initiate, la 
premiere demarche que fait I'ombudsman est d'ecrire a I'organisme contre lequel la plainte a ete 
portee. Dans sa lettre, il informe I'organisme en question qu'il considere provisoirement la 
plainte comme etant fondee, lui explique comment le cas du demandeur sera defendu et I'invite a 
presenter ses observations au sujet des mesures correctives envisagees. En reponse a cette 
invitation, le president du Tribunal a indique a I'ombudsman que le Tribunal ne jugeait pas 
approprie d'envisager de telles mesures au sujet d'une plainte portant sur le bien-fonde d'une de 
ses decisions. Des observations du genre constitueraient une defense supplementaire de la 
decision contestee -- ce qui reviendrait a ajouter aux motifs donnes par le jury d'audience ou a 
les changer sans autorisation -- ou des concessions que le Tribunal n'est autorise a faire qu'en 
exer^ant sa competence legale de reexamen. 

Cette occasion d'emettre des observations est manifestement offerte a I'organisme afin de lui 
permettre de persuader I'ombudsman qu'il se trompe sur les faits ou qu'il les a mal analyses, ou 
de rectifier une mauvaise decision avant que I'ombudsman ne porte a la connaissance du public 
qu'il la considere comme etant mauvaise. La lettre dans laquelle cette invitation est lancee precise 
que, sauf s'il revolt des observations convaincantes ou si des mesures acceptables sont prises, 
I'ombudsman rendra sa decision definitive, pour ensuite soumettre son rapport a la legislature et 
en envoyer copie au bureau du premier ministre. 

Meme si les membres du Tribunal sont a titre officiel independants, le renouvellement de leur 
mandat depend du bureau du premier ministre. Le Tribunal se trouverait done dans une position 
que Ton pourrait qualifier de delicate s'il decidait de se prevaloir des possibilites de rectification 
offertes a ce stade. 

Dans le cas qui nous interesse, j'ai informe I'ombudsman que j'estimais que le Tribunal ne 
pouvait rien faire pour I'empecher d'emettre un rapport et une recommandation defavorables si 
ce n'etait qu'attendre qu'il parvienne a une decision definitive fondee uniquement, du point de 
vue du Tribunal, sur les motifs exposes initialement par le jury d'audience. Le Tribunal 
determinerait alors si I'ombudsman avait identifie d'autres motifs pouvant justifier qu'il exerce 
son pouvoir de reexamen, en tenant compte de ses criteres habituels a cet egard. Le Tribunal ne 
pouvait se permettre de recourir a son pouvoir de reexamen en reaction a la decision provisoire 
de I'ombudsman et de donner I'impression d'utiliser le processus de reexamen afin d'eviter que 
I'ombudsman ne le critique publiquement. 

Le Tribunal a regu le rapport final de I'ombudsman au sujet de la plainte en question vers la fin 
de la periode visee par le present rapport. L'ombudsman y recommande un reexamen de la 
decision en question a la lumiere de son rapport. A la fin de la periode couverte par ce rapport, 
la reponse du Tribunal a cette recommandation etait en cours de formulation. 



13 



F LES ASPECTS ADMINISTRATIFS 

1. Faits saillants 

Au cours de la periode visee par le present rapport, le fonctionnement du Tribunal a ete marque 
par: la reussite de la campagne visant a maitriser le nombre de dossiers en souffrance au stade 
posterieur a I'audience et les retards au stade de la prise de decision; les efforts considerables du 
personnel en vue de mettre au point le systeme informatique de gestion de cas; la mise en place 
tres reussie du systeme de bureautique; la publication des premiers numeros du WCAT Reporter; 
la mise en service de la base de donnees Infomart fournissant le texte integral de tous les cas; au 
cours des derniers mois, la reorganisation visant a reduire a quatre mois le temps moyen de 
traitement de tous les cas. 

2. Le systeme informatique 

Pendant I'ete 1987, le Tribunal d'appel a dote ses bureaux d'un systeme informatique numerique 
autonome (Digital, All-in- 1) afin d'offrir un environnement de bureautique comportant les 
fonctions de traitement de texte, de courrier electronique, de documentation/analyse de la gestion 
des cas et de conference electronique. 

Le personnel, les vice-presidents et les membres ont re?u une formation sur Tutilisation du 
systeme au fur et a mesure de son installation. Tout le monde a reserve un bon accueil a ce 
systeme et a demontre un enthousiasme remarquable a regard de sa contribution au travail du 
Tribunal. En fait, la demande de la part des vice-presidents, des membres et de I'effectif a 
presque tout de suite depasse la puissance de prise en charge de terminaux fonctionnant sur 
I'unite centrale. 

En reponse a cette pressante demande, le Tribunal a choisi de surcharger le systeme de terminaux 
a titre experimental, en supposant que la charge imposee au systeme etait fonction non seulement 
du nombre de terminaux mais aussi de la nature et de la portee de leur utilisation. Puisque la 
planification de la capacite de tout nouveau systeme repose toujours quelque peu sur des 
speculations au sujet de la nature et de Timportance de son utilisation, il a semble raisonnable de 
mettre la capacite de notre systeme a I'epreuve plutot que de frustrer des le debut I'enthousiasme 
dont il faisait spontanement I'objet partout au Tribunal. 

Le systeme devait prendre en charge 54 terminaux, mais nous avons laisse ce nombre augmenter 
tres rapidement, jusqu'a concurrence de 91. 

L'experience a, jusqu'a present, ete couronnee de succes. L'ajout de terminaux supplementaires a 
reduit le temps de reponse mais pas suffisamment pour decourager les utilisateurs. 

La charge imposee au systeme le pousse jusqu'aux limites de sa puissance maximale, ce qui 
pourrait produire quelques mauvaises surprises. Cela a tout de meme I'avantage de forcer le 
Tribunal a user de creativite et de conservatisme a d'autres egards dans la gestion de son 
utilisation. Dans I'intervalle, mettre des terminaux a la disposition de la plupart de ceux, vice- 
presidents, membres et personnel, qui pouvaient demontrer un besoin et de I'interet a permis au 
systeme informatique de jouer un role de plus en plus important, ce qui a eu le grand avantage 
d'ameliorer la productivite et I'efficacite au Tribunal. L'experience nous a amenes a un certain 
nombre de conclusions au sujet de I'utilisation de notre systeme informatique. 

Voici les fonctions du systeme informatique qui se sont averees les plus importantes au Tribunal: 

(a) Le traitement de texte et, surtout, la capacite de I'ordinateur de permettre a ceux qui 
redigent les decisions et d'autres documents - les vice-presidents par exemple - de participer 
directement au processus de creation de documents. 



14 



(b) Le courrier electronique - Les communications instantanees de toute sorte, maintenant 
chose courante au Tribunal, ont grandement ameliore la circulation et la distribution de 
rinformation et des idees. II est difficile d'evaluer I'importance de ce systeme de communication 
instantanee en termes concrets, mais il est indeniable qu'il est devenu indispensable. 

Par contre, le Tribunal a constate que d'autres fonctions du systeme de bureautique ne lui etaient 
pas aussi utiles. Apres avoir essaye les methodes electroniques, les membres et le personnel de 
soutien en sont pour la plupart revenus aux calendriers de papier et aux aide-memoire classiques. 
Nous avons aussi rejete la bureautique en ce qui concerne notre systeme de classement. 
Preoccupes par la puissance de notre ordinateur, nous avons decide de ne I'utiliser pour le 
classement permanent que dans le cas des modeles, des precedents et d'une serie complete de 
decisions deja rendues. Nous n'avons eu aucune difficulty a prendre cette decision etant donne 
que I'utilite de fichiers electroniques permanents pour le fonctionnement du Tribunal n'etait pas 
evidente. 

La fonction de conference electronique a regu un accueil partage. Selon toute vraisemblance, le 
personnel et les membres du Tribunal opposent instinctivement une forte resistance a un systeme 
qui semble avoir la mission inhumaine de remplacer les reunions en bonne et due forme. lis 
participent done peu aux conferences electroniques pour le moment. Cependant, en tant que 
president, je trouve cette fonction tres precieuse dans mes activites de consultation et je suis 
certain que les avantages exceptionnels que presente ce dispositif de consultation de groupe pour 
un organisme tel que le Tribunal sauront se faire jour avec le temps. 

Quant au systeme de gestion de cas, il en est encore au stade de la mise au point. Les quelques 
paragraphes qui suivent sont consacres a ce systeme. 

3. Le systeme informatique de gestion de cas 

Au cours de I'ete 1987, le Tribunal d'appel s'est lance dans un important projet visant a utiliser 
un logiciel de gestion de base de donnees pour gerer les fichiers d'information necessaires a la 
preparation des cas et a la conduite des audiences. Ce logiciel perfectionne a ete mis au point et 
teste pendant la majeure partie de 1988. Des problemes se sont presentes, comme il arrive a 
chaque fois que Ton innove dans les spheres de la haute technologie, mais ils ont ete surmontes. 
Apres avoir atteint son objectif de mettre sur pied un systeme de gestion de cas, le Tribunal a 
entrepris de le mettre a I'essai afin de verifier s'il etait complet et Pa mis au point en en 
modifiant les programmes. 

Le systeme informatique de gestion de cas permettra non seulement de suivre de pres tout cas 
particulier mais fournira aussi une vue d'ensemble detaillee des activites quotidiennes, 
hebdomadaires et mensuelles du Tribunal. Les administrateurs pourront ainsi veiller a ce que les 
cas soient traites de maniere expeditive et reperer les faiblesses de la procedure. 

D'autres organismes du gouvernement de I'Ontario qui, dans le cadre de leurs attributions 
administratives, doivent gerer de nombreux fichiers et documents surveillent de pres les progres 
accomplis dans la mise au point et la mise en place du systeme informatique de gestion de cas du 
Tribunal d'appel. Vers la fin de 1988, le Tribunal a prepare un enregistrement expliquant le 
systeme en question a I'intention d'une agence du gouvernement de I'Ontario. 

Les travaux de mise au point ont toutefois demontre que le fonctionnement du systeme de gestion 
de cas requiert un systeme d'une puissance superieure a celle que nous avions estimee au debut et 
qu'il faudra ameliorer considerablement notre systeme informatique pour le rendre operationnel. 
II est done maintenant necessaire de decider s'il conviendrait d'effectuer ce nouvel investissement. 
A la fin de la periode visee par le present rapport, cette decision avait ete laissee en suspens 
jusqu'a ce que Ton soit parvenu a une meilleure comprehension des besoins du Tribunal en 
matiere de bureautique (traitement de texte, courrier et conference electroniques) et jusqu'a ce 



15 



que la procedure du Tribunal se soit stabilisee apres les nouveaux changements apportes en vue 
de porter a quatre mois le temps moyen de traitement. 

4. La dotation en personnel 

A la fin de la periode visee par le present rapport, I'effectif du Tribunal comportait 75 
permanents, 12 contractuels, 22 membres a plein temps et 37 membres a temps partiel nommes 
par decret. De plus, le Tribunal a toujours a son emploi huit medecins-conseils principaux a 
temps partiel. 

Le Tribunal d'appel a institue un service du personnel qui voit a toutes les questions reliees a la 
gestion du personnel et coordonne le recrutement. Ce service se compose du directeur des 
finances et du personnel, d'un agent du personnel et d'un commis a la paie et aux avantages 
sociaux. L'effectif du Tribunal s'en remet done maintenant a un seul groupe en matiere de 
gestion du personnel. 

Pendant I'exercice 1988, le Tribunal a du combler 29 postes vacants dans les categories d'emplois 
professionnels (avocats et gestionnaires), techniques (programmeurs et agent de formation) et de 
soutien (secretaires et commis). Vingt-six des 29 concours etaient ouverts au public et ont ete 
annonces dans le Topical et d'autres journaux. Plus de 1 300 personnes ont pose leur candidature 
a ces postes, et 350 d'entre elles ont ete revues en entrevue. 

5. Le Service du courrier et le Service des dossiers et des documents 

II est difficile de souligner I'apport de differents services sans souligner que le succes d'une 
organisation depend de la participation de chacun. II est toutefois important de mentionner le 
soutien administratif qu'assurent le Service du courrier et de la photocopie ainsi que le Service 
des dossiers et des documents. Disons, pour etre plus precis, que c'est grace a ces services que le 
Tribunal peut vaquer a ses affaires quotidiennes. Chaque mois, le Service du courrier et de la 
photocopie prepare 333 000 photocopies de documents, expedie 3 600 envois postaux et traite les 
2 000 envois regus au Tribunal. Le Service des dossiers et des documents gere 3 000 dossiers de 
la Commission des accidents du travail relatifs aux dossiers formant la charge de travail courante 
du Tribunal d'appel. II incombe a ce service de veiller a la surete de ces dossiers, d'assurer qu'ils 
sont a la disposition du Tribunal en temps voulu et, une fois I'audience tenue et la decision 
rendue, de les renvoyer aux services appropries de la Commission. Ce service a aussi la garde des 
documents du Tribunal. 

6. Le Service de traitement de texte 

II est essentiel, pour que le processus de traitement des decisions arrive sans encombres a I'etape 
finale, que le Service de traitement de texte soit capable de preparer les ebauches et la version 
finale de chaque decision sans delai inutile. En 1988, le Service a maintenu un temps moyen de 
traitement de deux jours ouvrables. Pour donner un exemple du travail accompli, citons le mois 
de Janvier 1988 au cours duquel 429 decisions ont ete traitees dans un temps moyen de deux 
jours. Cette moyenne de deux jours a aussi ete maintenue en decembre 1988 lorsqu'on a prepare 
212 documents relies aux decisions. En plus de la preparation des decisions, le Service de 
traitement de texte est aussi responsable de la preparation d'autres documents necessaires au 
traitement des cas. 

7. Le Service de reception des nouveaux dossiers 

Le Service de reception des nouveaux dossiers represente un lien essentiel entre le Tribunal et les 
employeurs et travailleurs qui desirent en appeler d'une question tranchee par la Commission des 
accidents du travail. Le personnel de ce service est le premier avec lequel entrent en contact les 
personnes qui veulent se renseigner sur les procedures d'appel qui regissent leur cas et determiner 
la competence du Tribunal en la matiere. Les questions d'interet et les demandes d'interjeter 

16 



appel sont acheminees par courrier, par telephone et quelquefois par la visite directe d'une 
personne qui apporte ses questions et ses preoccupations sur place. Dans ce dernier cas, un agent 
a la reception des nouveaux dossiers prend la personne en charge, discute avec elle de son 
probleme et essaie de lui fournir toute I'aide possible. Au Tribunal, les preposes a I'accueil font 
partie integrante du Service de reception des nouveaux dossiers compte tenu du vaste eventail de 
questions auxquelles ils doivent repondre concernant le processus d'appel. 

8. Le Bureau des conseillers juridiques du Tribunal 

Le role du Bureau des conseillers juridiques du Tribunal continue a evoluer. On convient 
maintenant que le Tribunal a besoin de ses propres conseillers et que ces derniers jouent un role 
important, tant au stade prealable que pendant les audiences. 

(a) Son role au stade prealable a I'audience 

Pendant la troisieme annee de fonctionnement du Tribunal, I'adoption de I'objectif de traitement 
complet de quatre mois a force le Bureau a modifier ses procedes administratifs au stade prealable 
a I'audience. Les descriptions de cas doivent maintenant etre preparees conformement a un 
modele etabli, apres quoi les dates d'audience sont immediatement fixees. Des cadres superieurs 
passent en revue les descriptions de cas pour verifier les preuves medicales et determiner s'il faut 
ajouter des renseignements factuels supplementaires, effectuer d'autres recherches juridiques ou 
emettre d'autres observations. 

Le Bureau des conseillers juridiques du Tribunal voit de plus en plus a la preparation et a la mise 
a jour de sommaires des decisions que rend le Tribunal a I'egard de questions particulieres. Ces 
sommaires, appeles "revues des decisions", sont souvent distribues aux parties et aux jurys en tant 
qu'ouvrages de reference. 

Le Bureau contribue toujours grandement a la qualite des travaux du Tribunal et a leur 
accessibility en renseignant les parties et leurs representants sur la procedure du Tribunal, sur les 
questions devant etre traitees et sur les lois applicables. 

(b) Son role pendant les audiences 

La controverse que soulevait le role des conseillers juridiques du Tribunal lors des audiences se 
dissipe peu a peu. II est rare que les conseillers aient a contre-interroger un temoin en cours 
d'audience. Lors des audiences, leur role se limite clairement a aider les jurys, ordinairement en 
orchestrant la marche des affaires instruites, en assurant que les dossiers sont complets ou en 
presentant des observations soulignant les analyses optionnelles que le jury pourrait prendre en 
consideration. 

Dans les cas exceptionnels mettant en jeu la competence du Tribunal ou des questions qui 
I'interesse particulierement, les conseillers du Tribunal ont pour directive de defendre activement 
la position qu'il juge la plus appropriee du point de vue du Tribunal. Cet aspect de leur role a 
fait I'objet d'un examen dans la Decision n° 1091/87 (2 decembre 1987) et dans la 
Decision n° 212/881 (8 avril 1988). 

(c) L'evolution de son role 

Au Bureau des conseillers juridiques, comme partout ailleurs au Tribunal d'appel, I'engagement a 
regard du maintien de normes de qualite elevees continue a se heurter aux imperatifs d'efficacite 
et de rapidite. C'est la tension qui existe entre ces criteres de rendement qui continuera a exercer 
la plus grande influence sur revolution du Bureau au cours des annees a venir. 

Comme je I'expliquais dans le Deuxieme rapport, le Tribunal d'appel a recours a des jurys dont le 
role se limite aux activites prealables a I'audience (autrefois appeles jurys-conseil) afin de 

17 



permettre au Bureau des conseillers juridiques du Tribunal de solliciter et d'obtenir des 
instructions concernant la preparation des cas pour les audiences. Cette fagon de proceder s'avere 
toujours utile et compatible avec le modele judiciaire adopte par le Tribunal d'appel. Les 
membres du Bureau peuvent consulter ces jurys (maintenant appeles jurys d'instruction) pour 
obtenir des instructions a differents egards, par exemple la necessite de recommander un 
travailleur a un medecin pour qu'il subisse un examen avant I'audience. 

A I'origine, la procedure de recours aux jurys-conseil au stade prealable a I'audience prevoyait 
que les parties qui contesteraient certaines instructions donnees au Bureau par un jury-conseil 
seraient invitees a consulter un autre jury-conseil et a lui presenter leurs observations en vue 
d'obtenir des instructions differentes. J'avais explique cet aspect de la procedure dans le 
Deuxieme rapport. 

L'experience a toutefois demontre que les parties ne se prevalent pas beaucoup de la procedure de 
recours aux jurys-conseil. 

En vue d'assurer que la preparation au stade prealable a I'audience s'accomplisse dans les delais 
prevus et que les decisions rendues tiennent suffisamment compte des exigences particulieres a 
chaque cas, le Tribunal d'appel en est venu a renvoyer systematiquement au jury charge de juger 
le cas toute question contentieuse se posant au stade prealable a I'audience. Le jury d'audience 
peut alors, a sa discretion, entendre des observations et inscrire la question contentieuse en tant 
que question preliminaire avant d'examiner le fond de I'appel lors de I'audience ou choisir 
d'attendre la fin de I'audience pour resoudre la question. 

Cette modification de la procedure a eu pour effet de permettre au Bureau des conseillers 
juridiques du Tribunal de preparer les cas de maniere expeditive, d'utiliser le plus efficacement 
possible le temps du jury et d'assurer la prise de decisions vraiment appropriees a I'egard 
d'importantes questions soulevees au stade prealable a I'audience. 

9. Inscription des audiences 

Le Service d'inscription des audiences du Tribunal releve maintenant d'un administrateur des 
appels, qui a remplace le coordonnateur des audiences. La titulaire du nouveau poste est chargee 
non seulement de I'inscription des audiences, mais aussi de regler les demandes d'ajournements, 
d'assignations, d'indemnites de temoin et toutes les questions reliees aux audiences. 

A la fin de la periode visee par ce rapport, le Service d'inscription, qui n'inscrivait auparavant les 
audiences qu'avec le consentement des parties, se preparait a commencer a les inscrire, sans 
consentement au besoin, dans les six semaines suivant la reception de la description de cas par les 
parties, afin de contribuer a I'atteinte de I'objectif de quatre mois. 

10. L'objectif de quatre mois 

Le Tribunal est resolu a entendre les parties en audience et a rendre ses decisions plus 
rapidement, sans sacrifier la qualite de son processus de decision. En consequence, apres nous 
etre consacres a la rationalisation de nos procedures internes, nous effectuons des changements en 
vue: d'eliminer les periodes au cours desquelles les dossiers sont "en attente"; de permettre a 
plusieurs services de travailler sur les dossiers en meme temps; de limiter les temps morts entre la 
fin de la preparation au stade prealable a I'audience et la tenue de I'audience; de fournir des dates 
d'echeance precises avant lesquelles chaque service devra avoir termine la tache qui lui incombe. 
Les parties de ce rapport portant sur la redaction des decisions, le role du Bureau des conseillers 
juridiques du Tribunal et le Service d'inscription des audiences fournissent de plus amples 
renseignements sur ces changements. 



18 



11. Le Bureau du conseiller juridique du president 

Le Bureau du conseiller juridique du president continue a jouer un role important dans le 
maintien de I'uniformite et de la qualite des decisions du Tribunal en revisant les ebauches de 
decisions. Cette revision est en general faite par le conseiller avec, a I'occasion, la participation 
du president. Cette procedure a subi de legers changements depuis le Premier rapport, etant 
donne que les vice-presidents a plein temps sont desormais a I'aise avec la Loi sur les accidents 
du travail et les principes d'application et qu'ils n'ont plus besoin d'aide reguliere. En 
consequence, les ebauches de decisions preparees par les vice-presidents a plein temps ne sont 
revues qu'a leur demande expresse. Dans les autres cas, le processus de revision suit la meme 
voie que celui indique dans le Premier rapport. 

L'assistance apportee par le conseiller juridique du president est assez semblable a celle que les 
clercs d'avocat offrent aux juges des cours superieures. Le conseiller attire I'attention des jurys 
sur les decisions importantes du Tribunal et sur les lois qui s'y rapportent. Si I'information 
offerte est d'importance, le jury la fera parvenir aux parties et les invitera a soumettre leurs 
observations. Le conseiller identifiera aussi les parties de I'ebauche qui semblent incompletes ou 
vagues ainsi que les faiblesses du processus de prise decision qu'une relecture de I'ebauche met en 
lumiere. 

Le Bureau du conseiller du president a soin de laisser la decision finale au jury. La principale 
raison d'etre de cette revision est d'assurer que les decisions ne sont pas rendues dans I'isolement, 
qu'elles respectent les normes de qualite et que la jurisprudence du Tribunal forme un ensemble 
coherent de decisions. 

12. Les audiences a I'exterieur de Toronto 

Pendant la periode visee par le present rapport, le Tribunal a tenu environ 40 pour cent de ses 
audiences a I'exterieur de Toronto, et les requetes a cet effet ont augmente de fa?on reguliere. 
Pres de 50 pour cent des cas proviennent actuellement de I'exterieur de Toronto. Le Tribunal 
examine divers moyens qui lui permettraient d'entendre plus rapidement ces cas, dont la 
possibilite de faire venir les parties a Toronto si les calendriers d'audience deviennent surcharges 
a certains endroits. 

13. Representation aux audiences 

Les statistiques ayant trait aux types de representation choisis par les travailleurs et les 
employeurs se trouvent a I'Annexe G. 



G LE CENTRE D'INFORMATION 

Le centre d'information qui met ses ressources au service du personnel du Tribunal et du public, 
releve du Service de I'information. 

1. La bibliotheque 

Au cours de ses deux premieres annees de fonctionnement, la bibliotheque a offert une grande 
variete de services a ses usagers tout en faisant face aux aleas de la periode d'organisation. 
Pendant la troisieme annee, ses activites ont plutot vise a rendre I'information et les ressources 
plus accessibles. Le personnel du Tribunal effectue de la recherche sur le droit administratif, le 
droit constitutionnel, le droit ou les principes directeurs en matiere d'indemnisation des 
travailleurs accidentes et les questions medicales reliees aux cas dont le Tribunal est saisi en se 



19 



servant des nombreux livres, journaux et documents gouvernementaux de la bibliotheque et des 
dossiers verticaux qui sont mis a jour quotidiennement. 

Les usagers de la bibliotheque peuvent aussi avoir recours a des services de recherche 
documentaire en direct, a des prets interbibliotheques et aux ressources des bibliotheques du 
voisinage. 

Dans ses classeurs verticaux, la bibliotheque offre une collection de documents choisis, 
comprenant des articles de journaux et des rapports sur de nombreux sujets pertinents aux 
questions que le Tribunal est appele a traiter. Les classeurs verticaux, auxquels sont 
continuellement ajoutes de nouveaux documents, contiennent des documents d'actualite sur des 
sujets relies a des demandes de recherche particulieres ainsi que sur les articles des periodiques 
auxquels le Tribunal est abonne, classes par titre. Diverses bases de donnees servent 
regulierement a des recherches aux fins de sensibilisation a des questions d'actualite. 

Grace au logiciel Cardbox Plus Database Management, le personnel de la bibliotheque peut 
fournir rapidement et facilement aux usagers I'acces aux documents figurant a I'index des 
classeurs verticaux et aux sommaires detailles des decisions du Tribunal prepares par les avocats 
du Service d'information et portes a la base de donnees DECISIONS. En utilisant les deux micro- 
ordinateurs de la bibliotheque, le personnel et les usagers peuvent chercher et trier des donnees 
telles que les dates, les jurys, les citations juridiques et legislatives, les mots-cles et la 
terminologie. 

Par ailleurs, afin d'ameliorer I'acces de I'exterieur, la bibliotheque a commence a offrir les index 
de sa collection d'ouvrages aux autres organismes faisant partie du reseau national de la base de 
donnees du systeme de catalogage UTLAS et des exemplaires de ses bases de donnees. 

Le personnel de la bibliotheque enseigne aux usagers comment utiliser le logiciel Cardbox et 
effectue de la recherche a leur intention sur place ou par telephone. La bibliotheque fournit 
aussi, au besoin, des copies sur disquettes de la base de donnees des decisions que peuvent utiliser 
les usagers disposant du logiciel Cardbox Plus. Le Centre canadien de la sante et de la securite au 
travail s'est prevalu de ce service afin d'etablir une partie de sa base de donnees CASELAW, a 
laquelle il est possible d'acceder grace a son service de recherche documentaire en direct - 
CCINFO. 

2. Les publications 

Pendant la periode visee par ce rapport, le Service d'information a assure la production de 
publications regulieres et nouvelles congues pour rendre les decisions du Tribunal accessibles aux 
travailleurs, aux employeurs et a leurs representants. 

Les quatre premiers volumes du Workers'Compensation Appeals Tribunal Reporter ont ete publics 
pour le Tribunal par Carswell Legal Publications. Le Reporter se presente sous la forme de 
volumes, de la meme taille que les recueils de jurisprudence, contenant le texte integral de 
decisions choisies, accompagne de sommaires, d'un index de mots-cles prepare par le Service 
d'information, d'autres index et de divers tableaux. Au cours des deux prochaines annees, le 
Reporter paraitra a un rythme accelere afin que le contenu en soit le plus actuel possible. 

Le Service des publications continue a cataloguer et a produire les sommaires des decisions du 
Tribunal. Ces sommaires, qui sont annexes au texte integral de toute decision demandee, 
constituent aussi une base de donnees individuelle parallele. 

Deux fois par mois, le Service d'abonnement aux decisions distribue des decisions choisies a ses 
abonnes. Qu'elles soient distribuees ou non par le Service d'abonnement, toutes les decisions 
peuvent etre obtenues individuellement. 



20 



Le Service des publications offrent aussi de nombreux index: The Keyword Index - un index 
alphabetique par sujet; The Numerical Index/ Annoted Statute - un index numerique de mots-cles 
et de sommaires de toutes les decisions, accompagnes d'une liste des decisions en vertu des 
articles de la Loi sur les accidents du travail et des reglements auxquels elles se rapportent; 
Section 15 Index - un index specialise des decisions du Tribunal et des causes judiciaires relatives 
au droit d'intenter une action civile; The Master List of Decisions - une liste de toutes les 
decisions indiquant la date et les coordonnees de reference dans le Reporter et I'index numerique. 
Ces index sont produits tous les deux mois, et on peut les obtenir moyennant une legere 
redevance. 

La publication Compensation Appeals Forum sur les appels en matiere d'accidents du travail est 
une revue dans laquelle les employeurs, les travailleurs et d'autres groupes peuvent faire paraitre 
leurs analyses des decisions et des procedures du Tribunal et des principes generaux 
d'indemnisation ainsi que leurs commentaires sur ces sujets. Cette publication est parue pour la 
premiere fois en octobre 1986. Depuis lors, d'autres numeros ont ete publics, et le dernier date 
de juillet 1988. En 1989, le service prevoit publier deux nouveaux numeros de cette publication, 
qui est distribuee gratuitement. 

La bibliotheque et le Service des publications ont recemment pris une nouvelle mesure pour 
rendre I'information encore plus accessible. En effet, faisant equipe avec le personnel du Service 
de I'information et les representants d'Infomart Inc., une entreprise specialisee dans la gestion de 
dossiers, ils ont constitue et mis en service une base de donnees appelee WCAT ON LINE, 
fournissant le texte integral des decisions du TAAT, integree a un systeme dote de capacites de 
recherche d'une puissance et d'une portee bien superieures a celle du systeme precedent. Seuls les 
membres et le personnel du Tribunal peuvent utiliser cette base de donnees pour le moment, mais 
le public pourra s'en servir des le debut de 1989 grace a I'acces electronique a distance. 



H LA CHARGE DE TRAVAIL ET LA PRODUCTION 

1. La charge de travail 

Le Tribunal a ete saisi en moyenne de 130 nouveaux cas par mois pendant la periode visee par le 
present rapport. Au cours des deux dernieres annees, le nombre de nouveaux cas a diminue 
progressivement de 8 pour cent par annee. 

On trouvera des renseignements detailles sur la charge de travail a V Annexe D. 

2. La production du Tribunal 

Pendant les 15 mois vises par ce rapport, le Tribunal a traite 2 441 cas. Ce chiffre inclut les cas 
qui ont requis une audience, ceux pour lesquels seuls des documents ecrits ont ete examines, ceux 
qui ont fait I'objet d'une mediation et ceux qui ont ete regies au niveau administratif. A la fin de 
decembre 1988, 69 pour cent des 270 cas au stade posterieur a I'audience etaient des cas dont 
I'audience etait recente (entre et 4 mois). 

En decembre, le taux de decisions rendues par rapport au nombre d'audiences tenues dans un 
meme mois -- un indicateur approximatif de notre progression ou de notre regression - s'etait 
stabilise a 127 pour cent. Au cours des derniers mois de la periode visee par ce rapport, nous 
avions done rendu environ 30 pour cent plus de decisions que nous avions tenu d'audiences. C'est 
done dire que la duree du processus de decision s'ameliore constamment. 

On trouvera des renseignements detailles sur la production du Tribunal aux Annexe E et F. 

21 



I LE RAYONNEMENT ET LA FORMATION 

Conformement a son engagement en ce sens, le Tribunal d'appel aide toujours les travailleurs et 
le patronat a comprendre son role et leur offre des activites de formation pour qu'ils soient mieux 
prepares a jouer leur role dans le systeme d'appel. Le Comite de rayonnement et de formation, 
un comite tripartite compose de membres de jurys et d'employes de soutien, continue a etre invite 
a prendre la parole a des conferences et a prendre part a des ateliers et a des colloques. 

L'annee passee, le Tribunal a deploye encore plus d'efforts afin de respecter son engagement a 
regard de la formation du public. II a aussi modifie ses methodes afin de pouvoir atteindre un 
auditoire aussi vaste que possible. II a entre autres produit un film sur bande magnetoscopique 
presentant une audience simulee du Tribunal. Prepare par des professionnels a partir de 
differents cas portant sur le droit a des indemnites, le film presente les faits saillants d'une 
audience type du Tribunal d'appel. Une trousse pedagogique composee d'un fac-simile d'une 
description de cas et d'exercices ecrits accompagne la bande magnetoscopique. On peut 
emprunter ce film, intitule "Final Appeal", en s'adressant a la bibliotheque du Tribunal d'appel. 
En outre, le Comite de rayonnement et de formation se tient a la disposition de tout groupe qui 
serait interesse a entendre un expose base sur le film ou portant sur tout autre aspect du travail 
du Tribunal. 

Le film en question, qui a ete presente un peu partout dans la province a I'occasion de 
conferences et de colloques, a jusqu'a maintenant suscite une reaction tres positive de la part de 
tous les auditoires. II permet en particulier aux auditoires peu familiers avec le systeme d'appel 
du Tribunal d'acquerir une connaissance elementaire de sa procedure. Les auditoires qui 
possedent deja un bon bagage de connaissances dans le domaine I'utilisent dans le cadre de 
discussions portant sur des aspects particuliers du processus ou pour ameliorer leurs propres 
aptitudes d'intervenants. 



J LES SERVICES EN FRAN^AIS 

Le Comite des services en fran^ais a entrepris de nombreux projets en 1988 afin de preparer le 
Tribunal a mettre la Loi sur les services en fran9ais en application, en novembre 1989. Pendant 
la periode visee par ce rapport, le Tribunal a aussi ete en mesure de tenir des audiences et de 
publier des decisions en frangais grace a I'acquisition de ressources en frangais et a I'apport de 
membres bilingues nommes par decret. 

Le Tribunal estime maintenant devoir retenir les services d'un traducteur-reviseur a plein temps 
qui verra a la traduction en frangais de descriptions de cas, de decisions, de documents destines 
au public et de son rapport annuel. Pour le moment, la majeure partie de ce travail est effectuee 
par des traducteurs de I'exterieur et des experts-conseil. Un traducteur-reviseur devrait entrer en 
fonction au Tribunal au debut de 1989. 

Le Tribunal a fait tout le necessaire pour produire un bon eventail de documents de base en 
frangais en faisant traduire son Deuxieme rapport, les directives de procedure n°^ 1 a 9 et 
I'enonce de son mandat, ainsi que pour assurer remission rapide des decisions rendues en 
frangais. Un lexique de la terminologie juridique et medicale particuliere a ses decisions est 
actuellement en cours de preparation. 

Le Tribunal a egalement offert des cours de frangais reguliers aux niveaux debutant, 
intermediaire et avance auxquels ses membres nommes par decret et son personnel ont participe 



22 



en grand nombre. Plus de 31 personnes ont profite de ces cours, qui sont offerts a Theure du 
dejeuner et dans la soiree. 

Le Tribunal a aussi embauche un commis bilingue, prepose a la reception des nouveaux dossiers, 
qui a pour tache d'aider a repondre aux demandes de renseignements adressees en fran^ais aux 
services d'accueil et de reception des nouveaux dossiers. Une secretaire bilingue attachee au 
Bureau du president et un avocat bilingue au Bureau des conseillers juridiques font aussi partie 
du personnel du Tribunal. 



K LES QUESTIONS DE FOND TRAITEES AU COURS DE LA PERIODE VISEE 

Etant donne la taille du present rapport, nous ne pouvons passer ici en revue toutes les questions 
importantes d'ordre juridique, factuelle et medicale que le Tribunal a traitees au cours des 
15 derniers mois. Les paragraphes qui suivent ne donnent done qu'une simple indication de la 
diversite et de la nature des problemes examines pendant cette periode. 

1. Evaluation des pensions 

Pour la premiere fois, le Tribunal a ete saisi de cas portant sur la justesse des evaluations aux fins 
de pension. Les problemes inherents auxquels se sont alors heurtes les jurys sont examines dans 
la Decision n° 915 (22 mai 1987). Les jurys acquierent toutefois de plus en plus d'experience dans 
ce domaine. 

En regie generale, ils determinent le degre d'invalidite au moment pertinent, comparent leurs 
constatations a celles de la Commission et determinent si cette derniere a bien applique le bareme 
de taux dans le cas en question. Se reporter a la Decision n° 381/88 (2 septembre 1988). 
Toutefois, comme il est indique dans la Decision n° 255/88 (19 mai 1988), la strategie d'examen 
adoptee doit convenir aux circonstances et aux faits particuliers a chaque cas examine. 

Des evaluations aux fins de pension ont ete confirmees dans de nombreux cas oil les preuves 
medicales independantes appuyaient les evaluations de la Commission. Se reporter aux 
Decisions n°^ 282/88 (25 mai 1988) et 255/88 (19 mai 1988). Dans la Decision n° 582/88 (7 
decembre 1988), le jury a toutefois juge que revaluation n'avait pas suffisamment tenu compte 
du role de I'accident du travail dans I'aggravation d'un etat preexistant dont le travailleur etait 
atteint. De meme, dans la Decision n° 603/881 (13 octobre 1988), le jury a ordonne une nouvelle 
evaluation parce que la Commission avait neglige deux aspects de I'invalidite du travailleur. 

2. Supplements de pension 

Le Tribunal est generalement d'avis que les circonstances pouvant modifier I'effet d'une lesion 
sur la capacite de gain d'un travailleur particulier doivent etre ignorees lors du calcul des 
pensions d'invalidite permanente. Elles seront ensuite prises en consideration en vertu des 
dispositions regissant les supplements temporaires et les supplements pour travailleurs plus ages. 
Dans la Decision n° 447/87 (8 fevrier 1988), rendue sur I'un des premiers cas de supplement, le 
jury a estime que la Commission n'avait peut-etre pas le pouvoir discretionnaire de refuser un 
supplement temporaire a un travailleur qui n'a pas neglige de collaborer ou de se rendre 
disponible pour un emploi correspondant a ses aptitudes. Toutefois, dans des cas plus recents - 
Decision n° 124/88 (28 juillet 1988), Decision 212/88 (22 aout 1988) et Decision 349/88 
{11 juillet 1988) -, les jurys ont prefere les analyses etablies dans la Decision n° 915 et ont juge 
que la Commission etait investie d'un tel pouvoir discretionnaire. Pourtant, lorsque la 
Commission n'offre pas de programmes de readaptation professionnelle, le travailleur pent avoir 
droit a un tel supplement s'il agit de maniere a diminuer son invalidite et a augmenter ses chances 
de retour au travail. Se reporter a la Decision n° 548/87 (21 juillet 1987) pour obtenir un 
exemple. D'autres decisions traitent de questions reliees a la capacite de gain du travailleur. Se 

23 



reporter aux Decisions n°^ 670/87 (19 aout 1987), 638/88 (9 novembre 1988) et 5J0/88 
(9 novembre 1988). 

3. Maladie professionnelle 

Le Tribunal a aussi ete saisi de nombreux cas portant sur des invalidites resultant de I'exposition 
a des produits chimiques ou a certains procedes. Les jurys ont conclu qu'ils pouvaient examiner 
ces cas de deux manieres, soit en vertu de la definition legale de I'expression "maladie 
professionnelle" et des dispositions qui y sont reliees, soit en les traitant comme une "incapacite" 
survenant du fait et au cours de I'emploi. Comme il est indique dans la Decision n° 850 
(2 mars 1988), la definition legale de "maladie industrielle" semble reposer sur une analyse 
medicale et scientifique complexe visant a determiner si la maladie est directement reliee a un 
procede particulier. Le Tribunal estime generalement que le Comite des normes en matiere de 
maladies professionnelles est plus en mesure d'examiner de telles questions, et il prefere se 
concentrer sur le concept d'incapacite en relation avec les maladies industrielles. On peut obtenir 
d'interessants exemples de cette approche en consultant la Decision n° 31/88 (30 novembre 1988), 
portant sur un cas de "cocktail chimique", la Decision n° 214/88 (13 mai 1988), portant sur un cas 
de syndrome "d'edifice scelle" et la Decision n° 1296/87 (20 mai 1988), portant sur un cas de 
cancer du poumon et d'exposition au chrome. 

Dans le cas de telles maladies, le Tribunal a recours au test habituel en determinant si I'emploi du 
travailleur a contribue notablement a son invalidite. Par consequent, un travailleur qui fume et 
contracte un cancer du poumon aura quand meme droit a une indemnisation si son travail 
constituait aussi un important facteur dans son etat de sante. Se reporter a la 
Decision n° 1296/87 (20 mai 1988). Toutefois, le Tribunal a refuse le droit a une indemnisation 
dans des cas du meme genre lorsqu'il ne disposait que de preuves tout au plus equivoques 
indiquant que le lieu de travail avait contribue a I'etat du travailleur. Se reporter a la Decision 
n" 755/57 (I*"" avril 1988). 

La Decision n° 421/87 (22 avril 1988) est I'une des rares decisions qui aient necessite I'examen 
des dispositions legales regissant les "maladies industrielles" et I'effet de la disposition de 
presomption du paragraphe 122(9) sur les cas de "maladies industrielles" inscrites a I'annexe 3. 
Cette decision comporte un interessant examen des differences entre les acceptions medicale et 
juridique du concept de causalite. 

Les dispositions legales regissant le droit a un avis dans les cas de "maladies industrielles" sont 
examinees dans la Decision n° 140/87 (15 novembre 1988) 

4, Le stress professionnel 

Le stress professionnel est une question connexe qui a fait I'objet d'une certaine publicite. Un 
certain nombre de decisions indiquent que les invalidites causees par le stress professionnel ne 
sont pas, en principe, rejetees du systeme d'indemnisation; aucun cas du genre, ou le stress 
represente I'unique raison de I'appel, n'a cependant ete accueilli pendant la periode visee par le 
present rapport. Dans la Decision n° 828 (9 Janvier 1987), le stress n'etait que I'un des nombreux 
facteurs professionnels impliques. 

C'est la Decision n° 918 (8 juillet 1988) qui comporte I'examen le plus exhaustif du stress 
professionnel. Le jury charge du cas en question a conclu que le stress pouvait donner lieu a une 
indemnisation sous le concept de "maladie industrielle" ou sous celui d'"incapacite". Encore la, le 
jury a decide d'analyser le cas en le traitant sous le concept d'"incapacite" etant donne que la 
definition legale de "maladie industrielle" requiert beaucoup plus de preuves. La majorite du jury 
a souligne qu'il etait difficile de prouver que le travail constituait un important facteur 
contribuant au stress mental, etant donne les nombreuses sources de stress non reliees au travail. 



24 



Pour determiner si le travail constituait bien un tel facteur, la majorite du jury a propose de 
proceder a Tenquete a deux volets suivante: 

(a) Le travailleur etait-il soumis a un stress professionnel indiscutablement superieur a 
celui ressenti par le travailleur moyen? 

(b) Si tel n'etait pas le cas, existe-t-il des preuves manifestes et convaincantes que le 
stress ordinaire et habituel relie au lieu de travail a joue un role preponderant dans la lesion? 

La majorite du jury a conclu que les preuves n'avaient pas formellement demontre que le stress 
relie au lieu de travail avail cause Tinvalidite. La minorite du jury a per^u les preuves 
differemment et s'est demande si la majorite du jury s'en etait bien tenue a la norma 
traditionnelle requise pour trancher un cas. 

5. Les problemes de delais 

Le Tribunal s'est aussi penche sur les difficultes que pose I'absence de limites et sur I'effet des 
changements apportes au libelle de la Loi. La Decision n° 483/88 (18 novembre 1988) traite des 
difficultes particulieres a un accident mortel qui n'avait pas fait I'objet d'une enquete integrale 
lorsqu'il etait survenu en 1927, et a conclu qu'une orpheline, qui n'avait jamais connu son pere, 
avait droit a une indemnisation. Dans la Decision n" 765 (3 octobre 1988), le jury a analyse les 
complications juridiques entrainees par une modification de la Loi ayant effet sur la situation 
d'un travailleur et s'est demande si ladite modification devait avoir un effet retroactif ou 
retrospectif. La Decision n° 915A revolt la common law de la retroactivite et ses effets sur les 
positions medicales et legales acceptees auparavant. 

6. Article 15 - Le droit d'intenter une action 

Enfin, il convient de mentionner la jurisprudence du Tribunal en ce qui concerne la suppression 
du droit d'intenter une action. Dans les Decisions n°^ 490/881 (2 aout 1988) et 485/88 
(28 octobre 1988), les jurys ont considere les definitions legales des expressions "personnes a 
charge" et "membres de la famille". lis y ont aussi examine s'il etait possible de supprimer les 
droits d'intenter une action d'une personne, meme si elle n'etait pas admissible a recevoir des 
indemnites. Dans les Decisions n°^ 432/88 (5 octobre 1988), 965/871 (20 mai 1988), 1266/87 
(11 mai 1988), 503/87 (16 mai 1988), 259/88 (22 juin 1988) et d'autres, le Tribunal a aussi 
examine I'effet de la Loi et d'autres causes d'action possibles, telles que les demandes relatives a 
la responsabilite decoulant du vice d'un produit, a la responsabilite des occupants, a 
I'inobservation d'un contrat ou a des dommages materiels. 

7. Autres 

Au cours de la periode visee par ce rapport, le Tribunal s'est aussi penche sur I'indemnisation des 
travailleurs frappes d'une crise cardiaque sur les lieux de travail; sur les consequences de la 
comprehension du concept "arriver du fait et au cours de I'emploi" dans diverses situations; sur la 
difficulte de distinguer les cas de douleur chronique de ceux relevant de la psychologic; sur les 
difficultes qui se presentent dans les cas des logements provisoires sur les lieux de travail; sur les 
problemes continus des accidents qui surviennent dans les terrains de stationnement; etc. 

L LES QUESTIONS FINANCIERES 

1. Le Comite des finances et de ^administration 

Le Comite des finances et de I'administration est un comite permanent tripartite du Tribunal. Ce 
comite, qui est actuellement preside par un membre representant les employeurs, supervise nos 
finances avec prudence. 

25 



En 1988, le Comite s'est surtout consacre a surveiller le controle du budget de I'exercice 
1988-1989, a convertir I'exercice du Tribunal de fagon a ce qu'il coincide avec I'annee civile a 
compter du 1^"" Janvier 1989 et a dresser le budget de 1989. 

On trouvera des renseignements detailles sur le budget visant la periode de neuf mois de 
I'exercice 1988-1989 a V Annexe F. 

2. Preparation du budget de 1989 

La preparation du budget de 1989 a comporte un examen approfondi du budget au cours duquel 
le Comite des finances et de I'administration a passe au peigne fin les presentations budgetaires 
des differents services, ce qui lui a permis d'etablir un budget provisoire. Ce budget a ete soumis 
a un examen minutieux d'une semaine par un comite extraordinaire, compose du president du 
Tribunal, du president suppleant, du directeur general, des chefs de services, des membres du 
Comite des finances et de I'administration et du Comite de direction ainsi que des presidents de 
tous les comites permanents. En septembre 1988, le Tribunal a soumis son budget definitif au 
ministre du Travail aux fins d'approbation. 

En depit de I'effort enorme deploye en vue de maintenir I'augmentation du budget a seulement 
4 pour cent, une augmentation de 4,6 pour cent s'est averee necessaire. Les depenses de 
fonctionnement s'elevent a 8,76 millions comparativement a 8,38 millions dans le budget de 
I'exercice 1988-1989. Le ministre a approuve le budget tel qu'il lui avait ete soumis. 

3. Verifications 

Le Tribunal a ete informe que le personnel de verification interne du ministere du Travail se 
prepare a proceder a une verification de gestion au Tribunal d'appel en 1989. 

En 1988, le cabinet comptable Touche Ross a mene une verification des depenses engagees 
pendant I'exercice 1987-1988, conformement aux arrangements prevus dans le protocole d'entente 
conclu avec le bureau du verificateur provincial. Le meme cabinet comptable verifiera les 
depenses engagees pendant I'exercice de neuf mois termine le 31 decembre 1988. Les rapports de 
cette verification, qui n'etaient pas disponibles au moment de la publication du present rapport, 
seront presentes dans les rapports a venir. 

4. Etats financiers des periodes allant du 1^'^avril 1987 au 30 mars 1988 et du 
l*'"avril 1988 au 31 decembre 1988 

Ces etats financiers se trouvent a V Annexe F. 



26 



TRIBUNAL DAPPEL DES ACCIDENTS DU TRAVAIL 
TROISIEME RAPPORT 

ANNEXE A 

ENONCE DU MANDAT, DES OBJECTIFS 

ET DE LA PRISE DENGAGEMENTS 



ANNEXE A 

ENONCE DU MANDAT, DES OBJECTIFS ET DE 
LA PRISE DENGAGEMENTS 

LE MANDAT 

Le mandat le plus fondamental du Tribunal est de s'acquitter de fa^on appropriee des obligations 
que lui confere la Loi sur les accidents du travail. 

Ces obligations sont d'ordre explicite et implicite. Les obligations explicites, soit celles qui 
definissent ce que le Tribunal doit faire, sont en general enoncees clairement et n'ont done pas a 
etre repetees ici. 

Les obligations implicites, soit celles qui determinent le fonctionnement du Tribunal sont, par 
definition, sujettes a I'interpretation et au debat. II est done important que le Tribunal fasse 
connaitre la perception qu'il a de ces dernieres obligations. 

Comme le Tribunal les comprend, les obligations statutaires implicites peuvent etre decrites en 
ces termes: 

l.Le Tribunal doit etre competent, impartial et equitable. 

2. Le Tribunal doit etre independant. 

Cette independance se definit de trois fagons: 

(a) Le maintien de transactions juridiques fondees rigoureusement sur la lettre du droit et 
rindependance a I'egard de la Commission des accidents du travail. 

(b) L'engagement de la part du president, des vice-presidents et des membres de ne pas 
se laisser indument influencer par les opinions des employeurs ou des travailleurs. 

(c) L'engagement de la part du president, des vice-presidents et des membres de rester fermes 
devant la possibilite d'une disapprobation des autorites gouvernementales. 

3. Le Tribunal doit avoir recours a un processus de prise de decision approprie. A ce litre, le 
Tribunal croit qu'un tel processus doit se conformer aux concepts fondamentaux suivants: 

(a) Le processus doit etre reconnu comme etant non antagoniste, dans le sens generalement 
donne a ce concept dans le contexte de la common law. 

(Contrairement a ce qui se passe en cour, le Tribunal n'a pas pour fonction de resoudre un 
differend entre des parties privees. L'interjection d'appel au Tribunal constitue une etape de 
I'enquete sur les droits et les prestations statutaires d'une personne victime d'une lesion 
professionnelle a I'interieur du systeme d'indemnisation des travailleurs. 

II s'agit d'une etape a laquelle le travailleur ou I'employeur peut avoir recours mais pendant 
laquelle, comme au cours des etapes initiales, il incombe au systeme de determiner ce que la Loi 
prevoit ou ne prevoit pas dans le cas d'un accident quel qu'il soit. 



ANNEXE A 

Le fait que le systeme soit investi de la responsabilite premiere a cet egard est reflete dans les 
mandats explicites d'investigation de la Commission et du Tribunal et dans leurs obligations 
statutaires respectives de decider des cas en fonction de leur bien-fonde reel et de la justice. 

En termes juridiques, la procedure du Tribunal peut etre qualifiee d"'inquisitoriale" plutot que 
d"'antagoniste". 

En depit de la nature non antagoniste ou inquisitonale de cette procedure, les audiences du 
Tribunal prennent normalement la forme d'audiences tenues dans le cadre d'une procedure 
antagoniste typique. En raison de ses caracteristiques essentiellement antagonistes, il est difficile 
pour le non-initie de saisir la nature fondamentale de la procedure du Tribunal. Cependant, la 
forme antagoniste d'audience reflete simplement le fait que le Tribunal reconnait tacitement que 
la participation des parties permettra de repondre aux attentes entretenues a cet egard et s'averera 
egalement la fa?on la plus efficace et la plus satisfaisante pour ces parties d'aider le Tribunal dans 
sa quete du bien-fonde reel et de la justice. 

Dans le cadre d'une procedure non antagoniste, I'engagement du Tribunal a I'egard des audiences, 
qui ont un format essentiellement antagoniste, est aussi appuye par le concept "d'audience" dans le 
systeme juridique canadien. Ce systeme juridique considere que les principes d'impartialite et de 
loyaute dans les cas ou I'audience constitue un droit, comme c'est le cas ici, sont tels qu'ils ne 
permettraient pas legalement, meme dans le cadre d'une procedure non antagoniste, de s'ecarter 
de la forme correspondant a la procedure antagoniste). 

(b) La nature non antagoniste de la procedure du Tribunal exige le respect des trois exigences 
particulierement importantes qui suivent: 

(i) Les jurys d'audience du Tribunal doivent prendre toutes les mesures qu'ils estiment 

necessaires pour se convaincre qu'ils possedent, dans le cadre de toute affaire, toutes les 
preuves disponibles dont ils ont besoin pour etre certains de pouvoir en juger le bien- 
fonde. 

(ii) Dans toute affaire, les questions en litige doivent etre determinees par les jurys 
d'audience et non dictees par les parties. 

(iii) Bien qu'elles soient reglementees et normalisees, les modalites d'audience doivent se 

preter aux modifications speciales que le jury considere necessaires ou souhaitables dans 
le cadre de toute affaire particuliere. Toute adaptation du genre doit, toutefois, 
permettre une audience equitable et refleter un souci profond d'integrite dans 
I'application des regies et des reglements generaux du Tribunal qui contribuent, dans 
I'ensemble, a une procedure efficace et juste. 

(c) La procedure de jugement doit etre pergue comme etant efficace et equitable par les 
parties. 

Elle doit fournir aux parties une connaissance opportune des questions en cause, une bonne 
occasion de recuser les preuves examinees, d'en soumettre de nouvelles ou de fournir leurs 
propres preuves, de presenter leur point de vue et de manifester leur opposition a I'egard des 
points de vue exprimes par la partie adverse. 

(d) La procedure doit aussi etre pergue par le Tribunal comme etant efficace. 



II 



ANNEXE A 

Elle doit fournir aux jurys du Tribunal les preuves, les moyens d'evaluer lesdites preuves et la 
comprehension des questions examinees afin qu'ils puissant juger en toute confiance du bien- 
fonde du cas. 

(e) La procedure ne doit pas etre plus compliquee, reglementee ou solennelle (et, par 
consequent, pas plus intimidante pour les profanes) que ne I'exigent les besoins d'efficacite et 
d'equite. 

(f) Apres I'audience, le processus de prise de decision doit fournir le terrain a une prise de 
decision tripartite efficace et a I'elaboration soignee de decisions appropriees. 

Pour etre appropriees, les decisions doivent etre ecrites et pleinement raisonnees. EUes doivent 
respecter le principe de la legalite et repondre a des normes raisonnables et generales de qualite. 
EUes doivent se conformer a la lettre de la loi applicable et tenir compte des autres decisions 
rendues par le Tribunal. II faut en effet que I'objectif soit d'arriver a des conclusions semblables 
dans la resolution de litiges similaires. 

4. Bien qu'elle doive generalement se conformer a ce qui precede, la procedure de traitement 
des demandes d'autorisation d'interjeter appel, telles qu'elles se distinguent des appels, doit etre 
soumise aux changements que peuvent prevoir les dispositions statutaires regissant chacune des 
differentes demandes. 

5. Le Tribunal doit tenir ses audiences et rendre ses decisions dans un delai aussi raisonnable 
que possible, compte tenu des contraintes decoulant de la procedure qui precede. 

6. Le Tribunal doit faire en sorte que le public puisse consulter toutes ses decisions. 

7. Le Tribunal doit, dans la mesure du possible, offrir ses services en frangais et en anglais. 

LES OBJECTIFS 

Pour mener a bien son mandat, le Tribunal s'est fixe les objectifs suivants: 

1. Parvenir a un temps de traitement des cas, depuis I'avis d'appel ou la demande jusqu'a la 
decision finale, d'une duree moyenne de quatre mois et maximale de six mois par cas, exception 
faite des cas particulierement complexes ou difficiles. 

2. Fournir un systeme pouvant, dans la mesure du possible, lui permettre de remplir ses 
obligations statutaires implicites, quelles que soient I'experience et les capacites du representant 
du travailleur ou de I'employeur dans un cas particulier ou en depit de la non-participation de 
toute partie ou de tout representant. 

3. Procurer un environnement professionnel qui soit accueillant et comprehensif tout en etant 
positif et rassurant a tous les points de contact entre le Tribunal, les travailleurs, les employeurs 
et leurs representants. Cet environnement doit refleter la manifestation d'un respect implicite de 
tout le personnel et de tous les membres du Tribunal envers les buts et les motifs des travailleurs 
et des employeurs dont les cas sont soumis a Texamen du Tribunal et envers I'importance du 
travail qu'effectue le Tribunal en leur nom. 

4. Maintenir un environnement qui soit stimulant pour les employes du Tribunal et qui leur 
offre des occasions de faire reconnaitre leurs merites personnels, de se perfectionner et d'obtenir 
de Tavancement, dans une atmosphere de respect mutuel. 

Ill 



ANNEXE A 



5. Maintenir en tout temps un nombre suffisant de vice-presidents et de membres qualifies, 
competents, bien formes et motives. 

6. Maintenir en tout temps une liste suffisante de medecins-conseil competents et motives. 

7. Maintenir en tout temps un personnel de soutien, administratif et professionnel, qui soit a la 
fois qualifie, competent, bien forme et motive. 

8. Fournir aux vice-presidents, aux membres et au personnel les installations, le materiel et les 
services administratifs pour qu'ils puissent s'acquitter efficacement de leurs responsabilites tout 
en ayant la satisfaction d'un travail bien fait, a la hauteur de leurs aspirations professionnelles. 

9. Remunerer les employes de maniere equitable et concurrentielle en fonction de leurs 
responsabilites et de la nature de leur travail, tout en respectant les limites implicites decoulant de 
I'obligation statutaire qu'a le president de suivre les directives administrative du gouvernement en 
ce qui a trait a I'etablissement des categories d'emplois, des salaires et des benefices marginaux. 

10. Entretenir des relations professionnelles constructives et appropriees avec le corps medical et 
ses membres, en general, et avec les evaluateurs medicaux du Tribunal, en particuiier. 

11. Entretenir des relations professionnelles constructives et appropriees avec la Commission, son 
personnel et son conseil d'administration. 

12. Entretenir des relations professionnelles constructives et appropriees avec le ministere du 
Travail et son ministre, et avec tout autre organisme gouvernemental avec lequel le Tribunal est 
appele a traiter de temps a autre. 

13. Renseigner le public, et surtout les travailleurs, les employeurs ainsi que leurs groupements et 
representants respectifs, sur le Tribunal et son fonctionnement de maniere a ce qu'ils puissent se 
prevaloir efficacement de ses services. 

LA PRISE D'ENGAGEMENTS 

En s'acquittant de son mandat et en poursuivant ses objectifs, le Tribunal a pu juger de 
I'importance d'un certain nombre de questions, a I'egard desquelles il a pris des engagements 
formels. 

1. Le Tribunal prend I'engagement de garder ses enquetes et ses travaux de preparation aux 
audiences a I'ecart de ses travaux de prise de decision. 

11 respecte cet engagement grace a un service permanent compose d'un personnel a plein temps - 
le Bureau des conseillers juridiques du Tribunal (BCJT). La tache du BCJT, en la circonstance, 
est d'effectuer les travaux d'enquete et de preparation aux audiences en suivant les directives 
generales du Tribunal. Lorsque lesdites directives generales semblent insuffisantes pour guider 
les travaux d'enquete et de preparations pour I'audience d'un cas specifique, le BCJT obtient des 
directives speciales des jurys du Tribunal. Les membres desdits jurys sont alors exclus de 
I'audience et du processus de prise de decision du cas en question. 

2. Le Tribunal s'engage a exercer un controle sur I'identification des questions en litige et a 
determiner s'il y a assez de preuves a I'etape precedant I'audience. 

IV 



ANNEXE A 

Etant donne que le Tribunal s'est engage a garder ses travaux d'enquete et de preparation aux 
audiences a I'ecart de ses travaux de prise de decision, c'est le BCJT qui exerce ce controle, 
conformement a des directives qui lui sont transmises de la maniere expliquee ci-dessus. 
(Cet engagement n'exclut pas les variations strategiques dans le degre de controle avant I'audience 
et la portee de I'initiative du BCJT dans la preparation des audiences, en ce qui a trait aux 
differentes categories de cas. Cet engagement permet aussi de ne pas soumettre certains cas pcu 
compliques au controle du BCJT.) 

II est bien entendu que le role du BCJT avant I'audience ne diminue en rien les attributions et les 
obligations intrinseques des jurys en ce qui concerne I'audience et le jugement de chaque cas 
distinct. II appartient aux jurys d'audience d'identifier les questions en litige; ils sont en droit, a 
mi-audience ou au cours des etapes ulterieures, d'entreprendre et de superviser I'elaboration ou la 
recherche de preuves supplementaires, d'obtenir I'execution d'autres enquetes judiciaires et de 
demander la soumission d'autres renseignements lors de I'audience. 

3. Le Tribunal s'engage a se faire representer par son propre conseiller juridique a toute 
audience quand il estime une telle representation necessaire ou utile. 

4. Le Tribunal s'engage a entretenir, dans ses travaux internes de prise de decision, une 
atmosphere de travail tripartite caracterisee par le respect mutuel et par une liberte d'expression 
fondee sur I'impartialite et I'exercice du meilleur jugement de tous les membres de ses jurys. 

5. Le Tribunal s'engage a maintenir des programmes de formation internes favorisant, a 
I'echelle du Tribunal tout entier, la comprehension de la nature et des differents aspects des 
questions qui peuvent surgir, des questions generiques, medicales, juridiques ou ayant trait a la 
procedure adoptee. 

6. Le Tribunal s'engage a etablir et a maintenir un centre d'information et une bibliotheque 
touchant aux sujets se rapportant a I'indemnisation des travailleurs en general. 

Ce centre et cette bibliotheque deviendront une source efficace et suffisante de renseignements 
juridiques et medicaux ainsi que de faits concrets sur I'indemnisation des travailleurs qu'il serait 
difficile de reunir autrement. Ils permettront aux travailleurs, aux employeurs, au public, aux 
representants professionnels ainsi qu'aux membres et au personnel du Tribunal d'obtenir les 
renseignements dont ils ont besoin pour bien comprendre le systeme d'indemnisation des 
travailleurs et les questions qu'il souleve, et de se preparer a traiter lesdites questions dans le 
cadre de cas specifiques. 

On pourra facilement acceder a ces sources d'information par divers moyens, dont I'utilisation de 
materiel electronique. 

7. Le Tribunal s'engage a creer un registre permanent de ses travaux distribue a grande echelle 
et facilement accessible. 

Ce registre comprendra les decisions du Tribunal jugees les plus susceptibles d'aider les 
representants des travailleurs ou des employeurs a comprendre, lors de la preparation de leurs cas, 
les questions relatives a I'indemnisation des travailleurs et la position que le Tribunal est en train 
de prendre a cet egard. 

8. Le Tribunal s'engage a faire examiner les decisions des jurys par le president ou par le 
Bureau du conseiller du president avant d'en emettre la version finale. Cet examen vise a 
assurer, dans la mesure du possible et compte tenu de I'autonomie preponderante du jury 
d'audience, que les decisions du Tribunal sont a la hauteur des criteres de qualite adoptes par le 
Tribunal. 

V 



ANNEXE A 

9. Le Tribunal s'engage a faire tout son possible pour que ses decisions se conforment 
raisonnablement aux criteres de qualite suivants: 

(a) Elles tiennent compte de toutes les questions pertinentes soulevees par les faits presentes. 

(b) Elles presentent clairement les preuves sur lesquelles le jury s'est fonde pour prendre sa 
decision. 

(c) Elles n'entrent pas en contradiction avec les decisions anterieures du Tribunal relativement 
aux questions juridiques ou medicales generales, a moins que le disaccord ne soit presente 
explicitement et que ses motifs ne soient expliques. 

(d) Elles presentent le raisonnement du jury de fagon claire et comprehensible. 

(e) Elles repondent a des normes raisonnables de comprehension. 

(f) Elles respectent les normes que le Tribunal s'est imposees quant au format des decisions. 

(g) Elles renferment une terminologie technique et juridique uniforme d'une decision a I'autre. 

(h) Elles s'inserent de fagon appropriee dans I'ensemble des decisions du Tribunal, ensemble 
de decisions qui doit etre, autant que possible, coherent. 

(i) Elles ne perpetuent pas de conflits a I'egard de questions non litigieuses de nature 

juridique ou medicale. De tels conflits, qui peuvent survenir pendant le developpement de 
points litigieux, ne peuvent caracteriser I'ensemble des decisions du Tribunal a long terme. 

(j) Elles se conforment aux lois applicables et a la common law et refletent adequatement 
I'engagement du Tribunal envers la primaute du droit. 

(k) Elles contribuent a former un ensemble de decisions auquel il est possible d'avoir recours 
pour comprendre et se preparer a traiter les questions soulevees dans de nouveaux cas et 
pour se prevaloir de I'important principe selon lequel des cas de meme nature devraient 
etre traites de la meme maniere. 

10. Le Tribunal s'engage a obtenir, pour chacun de ses cas, toutes les preuves qui peuvent etre 
obtenues par des moyens raisonnables et dont les jurys peuvent avoir besoin pour assurer la 
justesse de leurs decisions quand il s'agit de questions medicales ou factuelles. 

11. Le Tribunal s'engage a tenir les audiences qui ont lieu hors de Toronto dans des lieux 
appropries. 

Ainsi, les cas provenant de I'exterieur de Toronto devraient etre entendus dans des lieux 
convenant autant que possible au travailleur et a I'employeur. Cet engagement sera respecte dans 
la mesure oii il n'entrainera pas de frais de deplacement des membres du Tribunal ou de frais 
administratifs tels qu'ils nuiraient au bon fonctionnement du Tribunal. 

12. Le Tribunal s'engage a prendre en charge les depenses engagees par les personnes qui 
participent a ses audiences et a leur verser des indemnites de perte de salaire conformement aux 
lignes directrices de la CAT en ce qui concerne la participation aux affaires qu'elle instruit. 

13. Le Tribunal s'engage a payer les rapports medicaux juges utiles lors des affaires qu'il instruit. 

14. Le Tribunal s'engage a administrer ses depenses en faisant preuve d'un sens de responsabilite 

VI 



ANNEXE A 

financiere de maniere a ne depenser que les fonds necessaires a I'execution de son mandat et a 
I'atteinte de ses objectifs. 

Ce document reflate la comprehension que le Tribunal a acquise de son mandat, de ses objectifs 
et de sa prise d'engagements depuis sa creation*. Le Tribunal a approuve le libelle des presentes 
le r'octobre 1988. 



* La seule exception est I'objectif n° 1. Le temps de traitement vise etait initialement de six 
mois. 



VII 



TRIBUNAL D'APPEL DES ACCIDENTS DU TRAVAIL 
TROISIEME RAPPORT 
ANNEXE B 

LES MEMBRES DU TRIBUNAL 
AU COURS DE LA P^RIODE VISEE PAR LE RAPPORT 



ANNEXE B 



LES MEMBRES DU TRIBUNAL 



President 

S. Ronald Ellis 

M. Ellis est le premier president du Tribunal. II est entre en fonction le 1^*" octobre 1985. Son 
mandat a ete renouvele le l^'' octobre 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. M. Ellis, qui a ete forme 
et a travaille comme ingenieur avant d'entrer a la Faculte de droit, etait auparavant I'un des associes 
du cabinet d'avocats torontois Osier, Hoskin et Harcourt. Plus recemment, il etait professeur a la 
Faculte de droit d'Osgoode Hall, oil il occupait le poste de directeur, avant de devenir directeur de 
la Faculte des services juridiques communautaires de Parkdale. Avant d'etre nomme au Tribunal, 
il etait directeur de I'education et chef des cours de formation professionnelle du barreau de la 
Societe du Barreau du Haut-Canada. M. Ellis a une experience considerable comme arbitre des 
relations de travail. 

Presidente suppleante 

Laura Bradbury 

M""^ Bradbury a ete nommee au Tribunal le 1*"" octobre 1985. Son mandat a ete renouvele le 
1*"" octobre 1988 pour un an. Cette nouvelle nomination d'un an seulement reflete la politique 
d"'echelonnage" du Tribunal. On s'attend a ce que son mandat soit renouvele le 1^"" octobre 1989 
pour une periode de trois ans. Re^ue au barreau en 1979, elle a represente des travailleurs blesses 
et, au cours des deux annees precedant sa nomination, elle etait enqueteuse au Bureau de 
I'ombudsman. Le poste de president suppleant, qui n'est pas defini dans la Loi, est un poste cree 
par le president afin de repartir la charge administrative et de gestion qui revient au Bureau du 
president. Le titre a ete choisi pour refleter la nature principale du poste et le fait que le titulaire 
est aussi le vice-president designe par le president - conformement aux stipulations de la Loi a cet 
egard - pour agir en qualite de president en cas d'empechement de ce dernier et lorsque ce dernier 
est absent de la province. Comme le president, le president suppleant joue un role administratif et 
de nature judiciaire. 



VIII 



ANNEXE B 

Vice-presidents a plein temps 

Jean Guy Bigras 

M. Bigras, qui a d'abord ete nomme vice-president a temps partiel le 14 mai 1986, a ete nomme 
vice-president a plein temps le 17 decembre 1987. II etait auparavant journaliste et employe de la 
fonction publique. Au cours de ses 20 annees de journalisme pour des quotidiens de North Bay et 
d'Ottawa, il a acquis une vaste experience dans les domaines du travail et de la justice. Au service 
du gouvernement de I'Ontario, il a eu la responsabilite de coordonner un comite d'action du ministere 
de la Sante. 

Nicolette Carlan (Catton) 

M'"^ Carlan a ete nommee au Tribunal le 1^*" octobre 1985. Son mandat a ete renouvele le 
l®"* octobre 1988 pour une periode de deux ans. Diplomee en sociologie, elle a travaille neuf ans au 
Bureau de I'ombudsman avant sa nomination. De 1978 a 1985, elle etait responsable de la Direction 
generale des accidents du travail au Bureau de I'ombudsman. 

Maureen Kenny 

M"^^ Kenny a ete nommee au Tribunal le 30 juillet 1987. Elle a ete regue au Barreau de I'Ontario 
en 1979 et a travaille quelque temps dans un cabinet prive, avant d'etre analyste des politiques au 
ministere du Travail de I'Ontario. Elle etait conseillere juridique du president du Tribunal depuis 
octobre 1985. 

Faye W. Mclntosh-Janis 

M""^ Mcintosh- Janis a ete nommee au Tribunal le 14 mai 1986. Re9ue au Barreau de I'Ontario en 
1978, elle a travaille six ans a plein temps au Service de recherche chez Osier, Hoskin et Harcourt. 
Avant d'entrer au Tribunal, elle etait avocate principale a la Commission des relations de travail de 
I'Ontario. 

John Paul Moore 

M. Moore a ete nomme vice-president a temps partiel du Tribunal le 16 juillet 1986. II a ete nomme 
vice-president a plein temps le l^'" mai 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. Re?u au barreau en 1978, 
M. Moore etait auparavant membre a temps partiel de la Faculte de droit de I'universite de Toronto 
ainsi qu'avocat a temps partiel aux Services juridiques du centre-ville oii il traitait avec divers 
tribunaux administratifs. 

Zeynep Onen 

M""^ Onen a ete nommee au Tribunal le 1^"" octobre 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. Re(;ue au 
Barreau de I'Ontario en 1982, M"*^ Onen a travaille au Bureau de I'ombudsman pendant trois ans. 
Elle s'est jointe au Tribunal en octobre 1985 et a ete avocate principale du Bureau des conseillers 
juridiques du Tribunal de 1986 a 1988. 

IX 



ANNEXE B 



Antonio Signoroni 

M. Signoroni a ete nomme au Tribunal le 1^"" octobre 1985. Son mandat a ete renouvele le 
P*" octobre 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. Avocat depuis 1982, M. Signoroni a dix ans 
d'experience comme president a temps partiel du Conseil des arbitres de la Commission de 
I'assurance-chomage. Avant d'embrasser la carriere juridique, il a fait un travail considerable dans 
des organismes de service a la communaute italienne. II etait conseiller scolaire au Conseil des ecoles 
separees de Toronto de 1980 a 1982. 

David Starkman 

M. David Starkman a ete nomme au Tribunal le l^"" aout 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. II a 
ete re^u au Barreau de I'Ontario en 1980 et a exerce sa profession au cabinet d'avocats Golden, 
Green & Starkman. M. Starkman s'est joint au tribunal en 1985 en tant que premier avocat-conseil 
du Tribunal. 

Ian J. Strachan 

M. Strachan a ete nomme au Tribunal le I^"" octobre 1985. Son mandat a ete renouvele le 
l*"" octobre 1988 pour une periode de deux ans et demi. Regu au barreau en 1971, M. Strachan s'est 
specialise dans les conseils aux petites entreprises sur les pratiques commercials et les relations de 
travail. II a aussi ete directeur de I'Organisation canadienne de la petite entreprise. 



Membres representant les employeurs et les travailleurs : membres a plein temps 



Robert Apsey 

M. Apsey a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les employeurs le 1 1 decembre 1985. Son 
mandat a ete renouvele le 11 decembre 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. II a occupe un certain 
nombre de postes de responsabilite chez Reed Stenhouse pendant 25 ans jusqu'a sa retraite anticipee 
en 1983, alors qu'il etait vice-president du conseil et premier vice-president. 

Brian Cook 

M. Cook a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le l^"" octobre 1985. Son 
mandat a ete renouvele le 1^"" octobre 1988 pour une periode d'un an. Ce mandat d'un an seulement 
reflete la politique d"'echelonnage" du Tribunal. On s'attend a ce qu'il obtienne un nouveau mandat 
de trois ans le 1^'' octobre 1989. Diplome de I'universite de Toronto, M. Cook a ete travailleur 
juridique communautaire au Groupe des victimes d'accidents industriels de I'Ontario pendant cinq 
ans. 



X 



ANNEXE B 

Sam Fox 

M. Fox a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le l®"" octobre 1985. Son 
mandat a ete renouvele le l^'" octobre 1988 pour une periode de deux ans. Ancien president du 
Conseil des travailleurs de la municipalite urbaine de Toronto, M. Fox est aussi ancien codirecteur 
et vice-president international de I'Union des Travailleurs amalgames du vetement et du textile. 

Karen Guillemette 

M*"^ Guillemette a ete nommee membre du Tribunal representant les employeurs le 2 juillet 1986. 
M'"^ Guillemette a ete administratrice de la sante au travail a Kidd Creek Mines Limited de 
Timmins, et elle est membre de I'Association des mines de I'Ontario. Avant d'etre nommee 
administratrice, elle etait infirmiere industrielle a la mine Kidd Creek. 

Lome Heard 

M. Heard a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le \^^ octobre 1985. Son 
mandat a ete renouvele le P"" octobre 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. II a plus de 30 ans 
d'experience dans le domaine des accidents du travail. Avant sa nomination au Tribunal, M. Heard 
poursuivait depuis 13 ans une carriere chez les Metallurgistes unis d'Amerique, ou il etait responsable 
national de la sante et de la securite au travail ainsi que de I'indemnisation des travailleurs accidentes. 

W. Douglas Jago 

M. Jago a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les employeurs le 1^"^ octobre 1985. Son 
mandat a ete renouvele le 1^*" octobre 1988 pour une periode de deux ans. M. Jago a ete directeur 
en charge de Brantford Mechanical Ltd ainsi que president et proprietaire principal de W.D. Jago 
Ltd, deux entreprises en travaux mecaniques. II a ete membre actif de I'Association des 
entrepreneurs en mecanique. 

Raymond Lebert 

M. Lebert a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le l*"" juin 1988. Avant 
sa nomination au Tribunal, M. Lebert etait secretaire-tresorier des finances de la section locale 444 
de I'association des travailleurs canadiens de I'automobile. 

Nick McCombie 

M. McCombie a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le 1®"" octobre 1985. 
Son mandat a ete renouvele le 1^"^ octobre 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. Avant sa nomination 
au Tribunal, il a travaille sept ans comme travailleur juridique a la clinique juridique des Conseillers 
des travailleurs blesses a Toronto. 



XI 



ANNEXE B 



Martin Meslin 



M. Meslin a ete nomme membre a temps partiel du Tribunal representant les employeurs le 
1 1 decembre 1985. Son mandat a ete renouvele le l*"" aout 1988 pour une periode de trois ans en tant 
que membre a plein temps. II a dirige sa propre imprimerie pendant plus de 30 ans. II etait membre 
non juriste du Comite d'appel du regime d'aide juridique de TOntario, membre non juriste nomme 
du conseil de direction du College des medecins et chirurgiens de I'Ontario et membre du tribunal 
de discipline du College. 

Kenneth W. Preston 



M. Preston a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les employeurs le 1 octobre 1985. Son 
mandat a ete renouvele le l*'^ octobre 1988 pour une periode de deux ans. Ingenieur chimiste 
diplome, M. Preston a ete directeur des relations de travail chez Union Carbide pendant dix ans et 
vice-president des ressources humaines chez Kellogg Salada pendant trois ans. 

Maurice Robillard 

M. Robillard a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le 11 mars 1987. II 
etait auparavant depuis 20 ans representant international de I'Union des Travailleurs amalgames du 
vetement et du textile et a acquis une vaste experience de la mediation des problemes internes des 
syndicats, de la negociation des conventions collectives, de la comparution devant les commissions 
provinciales des relations de travail et de la sensibilisation des travailleurs aux droits que leur 
conferent les lois provinciales en matiere de travail. 

Jacques Seguin 

M. Seguin a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les employeurs le l^"" juillet 1986. 
M. Seguin a ete president de la Division du contreplaque de bois mou de I'Association canadienne 
du contreplaque de bois dur de I'A.C.B. et vice-president de I'ACCBD de 1981 a 1983. II a pris sa 
retraite de Levesque Plywood Limitee comme directeur general en 1984. 



XII 



ANNEXE B 



MEMBRES DU TRIBUNAL A TEMPS PARTIEL 
Vice-presidents a temps partiel 



Arjun Aggarwal 



M. Aggarwal a ete nomme au Tribunal le 14 mai 1986. II est actuellement coordonnateur des etudes 
de gestion du travail au college Confederation de Thunder Bay en Ontario. II a une grande 
experience juridique en droit du travail et comme expert-conseil en matiere de relations de travail, 
conciliateur, enqueteur et arbitre. II est actuellemen; arbitre agree. 

Sandra Chapnik 

M"™® Chapnik a ete nommee au Tribunal le 11 mars 1987. Attachee au cabinet d'avocats Leonard 
A. Banks and Associates, elle a egalement ete commissaire a temps partiel a la revision des loyers 
et enqueteuse a la Commission des relations de travail en education. 

Gary Farb 

M. Farb a ete nomme au Tribunal le 1 1 mars 1987. II a ete regu au barreau en 1978 et pratique le 
droit dans un cabinet prive. II a une vaste experience du droit administratif et a notamment ete 
conseiller juridique au Bureau de I'ombudsman pendant deux ans. 

Marsha Faubert 

M"™^ Faubert a ete nommee membre du Tribunal le 10 decembre 1987. Elle a ete regue au Barreau 
de rOntario en 1981 et s'est jointe au Tribunal en tant qu'avocate au Bureau des conseillers 
juridiques du Tribunal en octobre 1985, apres avoir travaille pendant quatre ans dans un cabinet 
prive. 

Karl Friedmann 

M. Friedmann a ete nomme membre du Tribunal le 17 decembre 1987. II est detenteur d'un doctorat 
en sciences politiques et a enseigne a I'universite de Calgary pendant 13 ans. De 1979 a 1985, il a 
ete le premier ombudsman de Colombie-Britannique. 

Ruth Hartman 

M"'^ Hartman a ete nommee au Tribunal le 1 1 decembre 1985. Son mandat a ete renouvele le 
1 1 decembre 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. Elle pratique actuellement le droit dans un cabinet 
prive specialise dans les appels administratifs devant les tribunaux provinciaux. Elle a ete auparavant 
conseillere juridique de I'ombudsman pendant cinq ans. 



XIII 



ANNEXE B 

Joan Lax 

M'"^ Lax a ete nommee au Tribunal le 14 mai 1986. Regue au barreau en 1978, elle a pratique le 
droit au cabinet d'avocats Weir & Foulds, se specialisant dans le droit civil et administratif. Elle 
est actuellement vice-doyenne de la Faculte de droit de I'universite de Toronto. 

Victor Marafioti 

M. Marafioti a ete nomme au Tribunal le 1 1 mars 1987. II est actuellement directeur des programmes 
commerciaux du college Centennial. II a ete pendant pres de dix ans directeur du centre de 
readaptation COSTI et a collabore etroitement avec la Commission des accidents du travail. 

William Marcotte 

M. Marcotte a ete nomme au Tribunal le 14 mai 1986. II figure comme mediateur sur la liste des 
arbitres agrees par le ministre du Travail. II donne des cours sur les methodes de negociation 
collective a Tuniversite Western Ontario. 

Eva Marszewski 

M'"^ Marszewski a ete nommee au Tribunal le 14 mai 1986. Re?ue au barreau en 1976, elle pratique 
actuellement le droit dans un cabinet prive, se specialisant dans les poursuites civiles, le droit de la 
famine, le droit municipal et le droit du travail. Elle etait membre du Conseil consultatif de 
rOntario sur la condition feminine. 

Joy McGrath 

M'"^ McGrath a ete nommee membre du Tribunal le 10 decembre 1987. Elle a ete re?ue au Barreau 
de rOntario en 1977 et pratique actuellement le droit dans un cabinet prive. Avant de suivre des 
cours de droit, M*"^ McGrath avait six ans d'experience comme presidente et directrice generale 
d'une compagnie specialisee dans le developpement commercial et residentiel. 

Denise Reaume 

M*"® Reaume a ete nommee au Tribunal le 11 mars 1987. Elle enseigne le droit administratif a 
I'universite de Toronto. Elle a deja effectue une etude pour la Commission de reforme du droit de 
rOntario sur la remuneration en cas de perte de capacite de travail. 

Sophia Sperdakos 

M™'' Sperdakos a ete nommee au Tribunal le 14 mai 1986. Re^ue au Barreau de I'Ontario en 1982, 
elle travaille actuellement au cabinet d'avocats Dunbar, Sachs, Appell. Elle etait p^sidente et 
travailleuse juridique du programme des Services d'aide juridique communautaire de la Faculte de 
droit d'Osgoode Hall. 



XIV 



ANNEXE B 

Susan Stewart 

M""^ Stewart a ete nommee au Tribunal le 14 mai 1986. Apres avoir fait un stage a la Commission 
des relations de travail de I'Ontario, elle a ete regue au Barreau de I'Ontario en 1981. Elle est 
actuellement un arbitre agree par le ministere du Travail. 

Gerald Swartz 

M. Swartz a ete nomme au Tribunal le 11 mars 1987. II a deja ete directeur de la recherche au 
ministere du Travail. II est aujourd'hui president de Canadian Loric Consultants Ltd. II connait 
bien la gestion des ressources humaines, la negociation des conventions collectives, Tarbitrage et les 
questions reliees a la remuneration des travailleurs et revaluation des normes d'emploi. 

Paul Torrie 

M. Torrie a ete nomme au Tribunal le 14 mai 1986. Associe du cabinet d'avocats Torrie, Simpson, 
il pratique le droit administratif, le droit des compagnies et divers aspects du droit civil. M. Torrie 
a egalement fait Texperience du travail juridique communautaire dans le cadre du programme des 
Services d'aide juridique communautaire d'Osgoode Hall. 

Peter VVarrlan 

M. Warrian a ete nomme au Tribunal le 14 mai 1986. II a acquis une grande experience des relations 
de travail au Syndicat des employes de la fonction publique de I'Ontario. II dirige actuellement un 
bureau de conseillers aupres du gouvernement et des syndicats et a ecrit un grand nombre d'articles 
dans le domaine des relations de travail. 

Chris Wydrzynski 

M. Wydrzynski a ete nomme au Tribunal le 11 mars 1987. Professeur de droit a I'universite de 
Windsor depuis 1975, il a ete re9u au barreau en 1982. II enseigne le droit administratif et a agi en 
qualite d'arbitre, d'analyste, d'expert-conseil, d'evaluateur de recherches et de membre de jury. 

Membres representant les travailleurs et les employeurs: membres a temps partiel 

Shelley Acheson 

M*^® Acheson a ete nommee membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le 1 1 decembre 1985. 
Son mandat a ete renouvele le 1 1 decembre 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. Elle etait directrice 
des droits de la personne a la Federation des travailleurs de I'Ontario de 1975 a 1984. 

Dave Beattie 

M. Beattie a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le 11 decembre 1985. 
Son mandat a ete renouvele le 11 decembre 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. 11 a 20 ans 
d'experience comme representant de travailleurs accidentes ou de pompiers invalides dans des 
audiences devant les arbitres aux appels et la Commission d'appel de la CAT. 



XV 



ANNEXE B 

Frank Byrnes 

M. Byrnes a ete nomme membra du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le 14 mai 1986. II etait 
auparavant agent de police et membre du Comite paritaire consultatif de la Commission des accidents 
du travail. 

Herbert Clappison 

M. Clappison a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les employeurs le 14 mai 1986. 

M. Clappison a pris sa retraite en 1982 apres 37 ans de service a Bell Canada. Au moment de sa 

retraite, il etait directeur de I'emploi et des relations de travail. 

George Drennan 

M. Drennan a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le 11 decembre 1985. 
Son mandat a ete renouvele le 11 decembre 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. II est representant 
de la Grande Loge de I'Association internationale des machinistes et des travailleurs de I'aero- 
astronautique depuis 1971. 

Douglas Felice 

M. Felice a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le 14 mai 1986. II travaille 
actuellement au Syndicat canadien des travailleurs du papier. 

Mary Ferrari 

M™* Ferrari a ete nommee membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le 14 mai 1986. 
Auparavant, elle etait conseillere juridique aupres du Groupe des victimes d'accidents industriels 
de rOntario. 

Patti Fuhrman 

M'"* Fuhrman a ete nommee membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le 14 mai 1986. Elle 
a ete assistante sociale au Advocacy Resource Centre for the Handicapped et, plus recemment, elle 
travaillait au ministere federal de I'Emploi et de ITmmigration. 

Mark Cabinet 

M. Gabinet a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les employeurs le 17 decembre 1987. 
II est actuellement administrateur au service de la sante et de la securite de la ville de Brampton, 
poste qu'il occupe depuis 1984. II travaillait auparavant comme conseiller en recherches pour 
I'Association pour la prevention des accidents industriels. 



XVI 



ANNEXE B 
Roy Higson 

M. Higson a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le 11 decembre 1985. 
Son mandat a ete renouvele le 1 1 decembre 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. II a recemment pris 
sa retraite, apres avoir travaille a I'Union des employes de gros, de detail et de magasins a rayons. 
II a ete representant international de la section locale 414 pendant neuf ans et il a 29 ans d'experience 
syndicale. 

Faith Jackson 

M*"^ Jackson a ete nommee membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le 11 decembre 1985. 
Son mandat a ete renouvele le 11 decembre 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. Aide-infirmiere 
a la maison de soins infirmiers Guildwood Villa de 1972 a 1985, M""^ Jackson a ete membre du 
Conseil executif de I'Union internationale des employes des services pendant six ans. 

Donna Jewell 

Residente de London, M"*^ Jewell a ete nommee membre du Tribunal representant les employeurs 
le 11 decembre 1985. Son mandat a ete renouvele le 11 decembre 1988 pour une periode de trois 
ans. EUe a ete directrice adjointe de la securite chez Ellis-Don Ltd pendant environ sept ans. Elle 
a dirige les programmes de securite et de traitement des demandes d'indemnites a la CAT chez 
Ellis-Don. 

Peter Klym 

M. Klym a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les travailleurs le 14 mai 1986. II travaille 
actuellement a TAssociation des travailleurs canadiens de la communication. 

Teresa Kowalishin 

M"^^ Kowalishin a ete nommee membre du Tribunal representant les employeurs le 14 mai 1986. 
Elle est avocate pour la ville de Toronto depuis qu'elle a ete regue au barreau en 1979. 

Frances L. Lankin 

M"^^ Lankin a d'abord ete nommee membre a plein temps du Tribunal representant les travailleurs 
le 11 decembre 1985. Pendant les cinq annees qui ont precede sa nomination, elle etait agent de 
recherche et d'education au Syndicat des employes de la fonction publique de I'Ontario. Elle etait 
egalement coordonnatrice de I'egalite des chances d'emploi pour ce syndicat. Le 25 fevrier 1988, la 
nomination de membre a plein temps de M""^ Lankin a ete modifiee au statut de membre a temps 
partiel afin qu'elle puisse accepter un poste au S.E.F.P.O.. 



XVII 



ANNEXE B 

Allen S. Merritt 

M. Merritt a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les employeurs le 23 juin 1988. II est 
actuellement conseiller en relations de travail dans sa propre firme de conseillers. M. Merritt a pris 
sa retraite en 1985. II etait alors surintendant des relations avec les employes pour le Conseil scolaire 
du grand Toronto et negociateur en chef de tous les conseils scolaires du grand Toronto. 

Gerry M. Nipshagen 

M. Nipshagen a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les employeurs le l*"" octobre 1988. 
II possede une vaste experience de gestionnaire dans les domaines de la fabrication et de I'agriculture. 
De 1980 a 1988, il etait directeur du service de la sante et de la securite au travail de la compagnie 
Leaver Mushrooms et etait responsable de I'indemnisation des travailleurs ainsi que des questions de 
sante et de securite. 



Fortunate (Lucky) Rao 

M. Rao a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant des travailleurs le 1 1 fevrier 1988. M. Rao 
etait auparavant representant des Metallurgistes unis d'Amerique et il anime, depuis 14 ans, 
remission "Labour News" a la television communautaire. 

John Ronson 

M. Ronson a ete nomme membre du Tribunal representant les employeurs le 11 decembre 1985. 
Son mandat a ete renouvele le 1 1 decembre 1988 pour une periode de trois ans. II a acquis une tres 
grande experience dans le perfectionnement du personnel chez Stelco. 

Sara Sutherland 

M""^ Sutherland a ete nommee membre du Tribunal le 17 decembre 1987. Elle est actuellement 
superviseure des services de liaison externe a la division de la sante et de la securite d'Ontario Hydro. 



Membres qui ont remis leur demission ou dont le mandat a pris fin 
au cours de la periode couverte par le rapport 

Donald Grenville 

Membre du Tribunal representant les employeurs (temps partiel) 

John Magwood 

Vice-president (temps partiel) 



XVIII 



ANNEXE B 
David C. Mason 

Membre du Tribunal representant les employeurs (plein temps) 

Elaine Newman 

Vice-presidente (plein temps) 
Actuellement avocat-conseil du Tribunal 

Kathleen O'Neil 

Vice-presidente (plein temps) 

James R. Thomas 

President suppleant 



XIX 



TRIBUNAL D'APPEL DES ACCIDENTS DU TRAVAIL 

TROISIEME RAPPORT 

ANNEXE C 

EVOLUTION DES RELATIONS ENTRE LE TRIBUNAL 
ET LA COMMISSION 

Section 1: Directive de procedure n° 9 



ANNEXE C 
EVOLUTION DES RELATIONS ENTRE LE TRIBUNAL ET LA COMMISSION 

1. Douleur chronique et retroactivite 

A la CAT comme au Tribunal d'appel, la question de Tindemnisation de la douleur chronique 
enigmatique et de I'amplification psychogene de la douleur definies dans la Decision n° 915 
(26 mai 1987) du Tribunal, troubles designes par I'expression "douleur chronique", est toujours a 
I'ordre du jour. Elle a aussi marque une etape particuliere dans revolution des relations entre les 
deux organismes. 

Peu apres que le Tribunal eut signifie, dans sa Decision n° 915, que la douleur chronique etait en 
principe indemnisable, le conseil d'administration de la CAT a adopte un principe directeur sur 
I'indemnisation des cas qu'elle relie a des "troubles de douleur chronique". Par la meme occasion, 
le conseil d'administration a decide, sur la recommandation de son personnel, de ne pas examiner 
la Decision n° 915 en vertu des pouvoirs que lui confere le paragraphe 86n de la Loi. 

En prenant cette decision, la Commission s'etait explicitement reserve le droit d'examiner la 
Decision n° 915 a un stade ulterieur; toutefois, elle avait aussi donne I'impression, a tout le moins 
au Tribunal, qu'elle ne considerait pas ladite decision comme etant enormement incompatible 
avec le principe directeur sur la douleur chronique qu'elle venait d'approuver. Le Tribunal n'a 
appris que beaucoup plus tard que, dans la mesure oil le personnel de la Commission etait 
concerne, cette impression n'etait pas entierement fondee. 

De la fagon dont le personnel de la Commission en est venu a I'appliquer, le nouveau principe 
directeur permet I'indemnisation des invalidites causees par la douleur chronique enigmatique 
mais ne permet pas I'indemnisation de la douleur chronique causee par I'amplification psychogene 
de la douleur attribuable a un probleme organique residuel. Ce principe ne prevoit 
I'indemnisation que dans les cas de douleur chronique de nature surtout non organique (definition 
servant a la categorisation des cas de douleur chronique enigmatique) et considere les cas 
d'amplification psychogene de la douleur comme etant en grande partie d'origine organique. Ces 
derniers cas sont encore traites en vertu de I'ancien principe directeur, qui stipule que tout 
element d'amplification psychogene de la douleur doit etre identifie et ecarte lors de la 
determination du degre d'invalidite indemnisable. 

A la longue, il est done devenu clair que, de la maniere dont il etait applique a tout le moins, le 
principe directeur de la Commission entrait serieusement en conflit avec la Decision n° 915. Dans 
sa Decision n° 915, qui portait essentiellement sur I'amplification de la douleur, le Tribunal avait 
conclu que I'element amplification psychogene de la douleur etait indemnisable au meme titre que 
I'element organique de I'invalidite. Le fait que la Commission ait decide de ne pas examiner 
ladite decision a voile cet important conflit pendant un certain temps. Pendant une periode 
cruciale, il a done existe un malentendu au sujet de la position du personnel de la Commission, ce 
qui a influence jusqu'a un certain point le Tribunal dans son traitement des appels ulterieurs en 
matiere de pension pour douleur chronique. 

Apres que la Commission eut adopte son principe directeur sur la douleur chronique, son 
personnel et celui du Tribunal ont debattu la question du traitement des cas de douleur chronique 
dont le Tribunal avait ete saisi mais qu'il n'avait pas entendus ou regies a la date d'approbation du 
principe directeur en question. Le Deuxieme rapport fait allusion a ce debat et a ses 
consequences sur le traitement du grand nombre de cas que le Tribunal avait laisses en attente 
jusqu'a la publication de la Decision n" 915. A la page 5 dudit rapport, on pent lire que le 
traitement de ces appels accusait encore un leger retard a la fin de la periode visee par ce rapport, 

XX 



ANNEXE C 

"le Tribunal et la Commission definissant leur role respectif dans ces cas a la lumiere du nouveau 
principe directeur adopte ulterieurement par la Commission sur la douleur chronique". 

Voici en quoi consistait le probleme. Le personnel de la Commission estimait que la Commission 
devait revoir, a la lumiere de son nouveau principe directeur, tous les cas de douleur chronique 
dont le Tribunal avait ete saisi mais qu'il n'avait pas entendus ou regies au moment de la 
communication du principe directeur en question. II considerait que le Tribunal n'avait plus la 
competence requise pour traiter ces cas tant que la Commission n'aurait pas determine comment 
son nouveau principe s'y appliquait. 

En vertu de I'alinea 86g(2), le Tribunal n'est competent qu'a I'egard de decisions definitives de la 
Commission pour lesquelles elle a epuise toutes ses procedures. Le personnel de la Commission 
alleguait que les cas de douleur chronique comportaient, apres I'adoption du principe directeur 
sur I'indemnisation de certains cas de cette nature, des questions au sujet desquelles on ne pouvait 
plus affirmer que la Commission avait epuise toutes ses procedures, meme si ces cas avaient ete 
portes en appel avant la communication dudit principe directeur. II a done informe le Tribunal 
que la Commission estimerait necessaire de poursuivre son examen de tels cas et de rendre ses 
propres decisions, meme si le Tribunal traitait ceux dont il avait ete saisi. 

La Commission a semble-t-il pris cette position parce qu'elle estimait necessaire d'etre la 
premiere a mettre en application son nouveau principe directeur. (Bien entendu, elle n'a pas 
conteste le fait que le Tribunal serait en droit d'examiner les cas en question en derniere instance 
si la decision qu'elle rendrait en vertu de son principe directeur etait portee en appel.) 

C'est I'avocat-conseil du Tribunal et celui de la Commission qui ont debattu cette question. 

La position du personnel de la Commission a cet egard a amene le Tribunal a entreprendre un 
examen particulierement minutieux de sa competence et des relations qu'il convenait d'entretenir 
avec la Commission. Apres de vifs debats internes, le Tribunal a conclu qu'il avait la competence 
requise pour traiter ces cas mais qu'il avait aussi la competence pour les renvoyer a la Commission 
pour qu'elle soit la premiere a les examiner en vertu de son principe directeur sur la douleur 
chronique et qu'il serait generalement approprie de le faire. 

Le Tribunal a ensuite emis une directive de procedure expliquant toutes les raisons pour 
lesquelles il avait decide de renvoyer ces cas a la Commission afin d'eviter que sa decision 
n'entraine des malentendus chez les travailleurs ou le patronat au sujet de la fagon dont il 
percevait son role et ses relations avec la Commission. La Directive de procedure n° 9 a ete emise 
le 23 octobre 1987. Cette directive, qui constitue la Section 1 de cette annexe, presente un interet 
particulier parce qu'elle revele clairement comment le Tribunal pergoit son role dans le systeme 
d'indemnisation et ses relations avec la Commission. 

La Directive de procedure n° 9 etait centree sur la controverse entourant les cas de pension 
comportant des etats pathologiques de douleur chronique. La Decision n° 915 portait sur un cas 
de pension, les cas en attente jusqu'a la publication de ladite decision etaient tous des cas de 
pension, et il n'etait pas clair aux yeux du Tribunal que le principe directeur de la Commission 
englobait les indemnites d'invalidite temporaire pour douleur chronique, en plus des pensions. 
Dans sa Directive de procedure n° 9, le Tribunal n'a traite que des appels en attente en matiere de 
pension. 

Peu apres la parution de la Directive de procedure n° 9, il est toutefois devenu clair que le 
personnel de la Commission estimait que son principe directeur regissait les indemnites 
d'invalidite temporaire tout autant que les indemnites d'invalidite permanente et, surtout, que les 
facteurs limitant la retroactivity des indemnites pour douleur chronique devaient s'appliquer de la 
meme maniere qu'il s'agisse d'indemnites d'invalidite temporaire ou permanente. Le principe 

XXI 



ANNEXE C 

directeur de la Commission prevoyait qu'aucune indemnite pour invalidite decoulant de douleur 
chronique ne serait versee pour des periodes anterieures au 3 juillet 1987, date de Tapprobation 
du principe. 

Lors de son examen de la question du renvoi a la Commission des cas de pension pour douleur 
chronique dont il avait ete saisi, le Tribunal s'etait entre autres laisse influencer par le fait que la 
Decision n° 915 etait la seule qu'il avait alors rendue a I'egard d'un cas de cette nature. De plus, 
le Tribunal croyait, comme il a ete indique plus tot, que la Commission considerait la 
Decision n° 915 comme etant generalement compatible avec son principe directeur. 

Toutefois, la situation etait bien differente dans les cas d'invalidite temporaire causee par la 
douleur chronique. Le Tribunal avait systematiquement accorde des indemnites d'invalidite 
temporaire pour des problemes de cette nature, sans imposer de limite a I'egard de la retroactivite 
desdites indemnites, pour toute une serie d'appels datant presque de sa creation (les decisions 
mentionnees le plus souvent sont les Decisions n°^ 9, 11 et 50). 

En ce qui concerne les indemnites d'invalidite temporaire resultant de douleur chronique, 
I'examen du role du nouveau principe directeur de la Commission dans la procedure du Tribunal 
n'a pas ete centre sur le renvoi des cas a la Commission. Avec le recul actuel, il est difficile de 
determiner pourquoi il en a ete ainsi. Si Ton envisage la question du point de vue de la 
Commission, il semble qu'elle aurait du insister pour etre la premiere a appliquer son principe 
directeur a ces cas, comme elle le faisait pour les cas de pension. De son cote, le Tribunal en est 
simplement venu a se demander s'il devait appliquer a ces cas les limites de retroactivite que 
prevoyait le principe directeur pour ce genre d'indemnites. 

Le Tribunal a expose pour la premiere fois sa position a cet egard dans la Decision n° 519. Dans 
cette decision, le jury d'audience declare que la CAT n'est pas investie de la competence requise 
pour forcer le Tribunal a modifier sa position a I'egard d'une question de droit general en faisant 
adopter par son conseil d'administration un nouveau principe directeur incompatible avec ladite 
position. Selon le Tribunal, la Commission ne peut modifier les decisions du Tribunal qu'en se 
prevalant de la procedure d'examen prevue au paragraphe 86n de la Loi. Le Tribunal a done 
decide, initialement dans la Decision n° 519 et, ensuite, dans tous les cas portant sur des 
indemnites d'invalidite temporaire resultant de douleur chronique, qu'il continuerait a prendre la 
meme position a I'egard de telles indemnites et qu'il ordonnerait que leur versement soit 
integralement retroactif, a moins que le conseil d'administration ne decide d'exercer ses pouvoirs 
d'examen en vertu du paragraphe 86n et ne reexamine la position du Tribunal, ou jusqu'a ce qu'il 
le fasse. 

Le conseil d'administration a decide d'exercer ses pouvoirs d'examen en vertu du paragraphe 86n 
a regard de la Decision n° 519 et, par la suite, de toutes les decisions dans lesquelles le Tribunal 
avait pris la meme position. La CAT se prevalait alors de ses pouvoirs d'examen pour la 
deuxieme fois, apres I'avoir fait a I'egard de la Decision n° 72 du Tribunal. 

Au moment oil la Decision n° 519 a ete rendue, le jury d'audience de la Decision n° 915 tentait 
toujours de determiner s'il devait limiter la retroactivite des indemnites pour douleur chronique 
accordees dans la Decision n° 915 et, dans I'affirmative, dans quelle mesure il devait le faire. Le 
jury n'a pas tranche la question dans la Decision n° 915 afin d'obtenir plus d'observations et de 
poursuivre son examen. Comme le Tribunal devait bientot rendre sa decision sur la retroactivite 
dans le cadre de la Decision n° 915, le conseil d'administration a reporte son examen de la 
Decision n° 519 et des cas qui y sont relies jusqu'a ce que ladite decision soit rendue. 

La question de la retroactivite dans la Decision n° 915 a ete jugee dans la Decision n° 915 A, 
rendue le 5 mai 1988. Dans cette decision, le jury a conclu que, dans les cas de pension pour 
douleur chronique, la Loi sur les accidents du travail, interpretee conformement aux principes de 

XXII 



ANNEXE C 

la common law, tel que lesdits principes sont appliques aux decisions de tribunaux administratifs 
incompatibles avec la position prise par des organismes de premiere instance sur des questions 
generiques d'ordre juridique ou medical, exige que I'effet retroactif de telles decisions soit 
raisonnablement limite. Le jury a toutefois estime qu'il fallait, en mettant en application les 
principes de retroactivite de la common law, limiter la mise en application retroactive des 
decisions de deuxieme instance visant les indemnites des cas de pension pour douleur chronique 
afin que ces indemnites soient versees pour des periodes debutant le 27 mars 1986. Cette date 
marquait le debut de la procedure qui avait donne lieu a la decision en deuxieme instance du 
Tribunal sur la douleur chronique et precedait de quelque 16 mois le 3 juillet 1987, date limite 
adoptee par le conseil d'administration en matiere d'indemnites pour douleur chronique. 

En traitant de la question de la retroactivite, le jury d'audience de la Decision n° 9J5A a pu 
indiquer que le Tribunal considerait le principe directeur de la Commission sur la douleur 
chronique comme s'appliquant a la fois a la douleur chronique enigmatique et a Tamplification 
psychogene de la douleur, troubles definis dans la Decision n° 915. C'est alors que le Tribunal 
s'est aper?u, comme nous I'avons indique plus tot, qu'il etait dans I'erreur et que le personnel de 
la Commission considerait le principe directeur comme etant non applicable aux cas 
d'amplification de la douleur. 

A la fin de la periode visee par ce rapport, le Tribunal n'avait encore rendu aucune decision a 
regard d'un cas auquel la Commission aurait applique son principe directeur sur la douleur 
chronique. Le Tribunal n'a done pas eu I'occasion d'examiner dans quelle mesure le principe 
directeur de la Commission respectait les prescriptions de la Loi. Toutefois, le conseil 
d'administration de la Commission, qui s'etait deja engage a le faire conjointement pour la 
Decision n° 91 5 A, la Decision n° 519 et les decisions qui y sont reliees et pour I'aspect 
retroactivite qu'elles component, a decide de soumettre aussi la Decision n° 915 a un examen en 
vertu du paragraphe 86n, apres que le Tribunal eut souleve, dans la Decision 915A, la possibilite 
d'un differend entre la Commission et le Tribunal a I'egard de I'indemnisation des cas 
d'amplification de la douleur. 

Lors de cet examen, qui vise maintenant les Decisions n°^ 519 (et les decisions qui y sont reliees), 
915 et 915A, le conseil d'administration de la Commission entend non seulement se pencher sur 
les questions touchant a la retroactivite et a I'indemnisation des travailleurs souffrant de douleur 
chronique, mais aussi sur les obligations du Tribunal lorsque le conseil d'administration etablit de 
nouveaux principes directeurs. L'ordre du jour de cet examen se trouve dans la Gazette de 
I'Ontario, vol. 121-44 (29 octobre 1988) a 5546. 

A la fin de la periode visee par ce rapport, le conseil d'administration recevait toujours des 
observations sur ces questions. 

2. Fibromyalgie 

Dans sa Decision n° 18 (11 mars 1987), le Tribunal d'appel a statue que I'etat pathologique auquel 
le corps medical refere par le terme "fibromyalgie", et parfois par le terme "fibrosite", est 
attribuable a une pathologie organique pouvant resulter d'un accident du travail. II s'agirait en 
principe d'un etat pathologique indemnisable en vertu de la Loi sur les accidents du travail. 

Par le passe, la CAT avait pour principe de considerer les cas donnant lieu a un diagnostic de 
fibrosite ou de fibromyalgie comme non indemnisables. A I'instar des cas de douleur chronique, 
ils etaient non indemnisables parce que I'etat etait imaginaire et susceptible d'etre surmonte si le 
travailleur etait assez motive pour reprendre le travail ou parce qu'il etait impossible de prouver 
qu'ils resultaient d'accidents relies au travail. 

XXIII 



ANNEXE C 

Apres la publication de la Decision n° 18, le personnel de la Commission a recommande a son 
conseil d'administration d'attendre pour envisager de soumettre ladite decision a un examen en 
vertu du paragraphe 86n et lui a demande I'autorisation de revoir le principe directeur de la 
Commission sur la fibromyalgie en vue de determiner s'il convenait de recommander I'execution 
d'un tel examen. Le personnel de la Commission a aussi recommande de donner suite a la 
Decision n° 18 entre temps. Le conseil d'administration a accepte ces recommandations, et le 
personnel de la Commission a entrepris un examen de la fibromyalgie et de son caractere sur le 
plan de I'indemnisation. 

La Commission a done continue a ne pas accorder d'indemnites pour les cas de fibromyalgie alors 
que le Tribunal d'appel demeurait fidele a la Decision n° 18 et ordonnait plusieurs fois par la suite 
le versement d'indemnites pour de tels cas. La Commission a continue a mettre a execution les 
decisions du Tribunal a cet egard, tout en attendant les resultats de I'examen effectue par son 
personnel pour envisager de les soumettre a un examen en vertu du paragraphe 86n. 

Le conseil d'administration de la Commission n'a re^u qu'en novembre 1988 la recommandation 
finale de son personnel au sujet de I'indemnisation des cas faisant I'objet d'un diagnostic de 
fibromyalgie. Entre temps, la Commission avait mis a execution plusieurs decisions du Tribunal 
ordonnant le versement d'indemnites pour de tels cas. 

Au terme de son examen, le personnel de la Commission a recommande au conseil 
d'administration d'adopter un principe directeur selon lequel les etats invalidant faisant I'objet 
d'un diagnostic de fibromyalgie seraient consideres comme etant indemnisables. Ce principe 
directeur etait fonde sur les similitudes existant entre les diagnostics de fribromyalgie et ceux de 
douleur chronique. II exigeait de la Commission qu'elle traite les deux etats comme s'ils ne 
pouvaient a toutes fins pratiques etre distingues I'un de I'autre et qu'elle fasse en sorte que son 
principe directeur sur la douleur chronique vise aussi les cas de fibromyalgie. Ce qui est encore 
plus important, le personnel a recommande d'appliquer aux cas de fibromyalgie les limites de 
retroactivite imposees dans les cas de douleur chronique, en ne versant pas d'indemnites pour des 
periodes anterieures au 3 juillet 1987. 

En ce qui concerne les decisions du Tribunal, ordonnant le paiement d'indemnites sans limite a 
regard de leur retroactivite, que la Commission avait deja mises a execution, le personnel de la 
Commission a recommande de ne pas tenter d'exiger le rappel des paiements excedentaires. Cette 
recommandation faisait exception d'un seul cas de fibromyalgie pour lequel le Tribunal avait 
ordonne le paiement d'une pension. Compte tenu de son approche a I'egard des decisions du 
Tribunal accordant des pensions pour douleur chronique pour des periodes anterieures au 
3 juillet 1987, le personnel a estime qu'il devait soumettre ce cas a I'examen en vertu du 
paragraphe 86n deja en cours pour les Decisions n°^ 519, 915 et 915A. 

Le conseil d'administration a accepte les recommandations du personnel et a adopte le principe 
directeur sur la fibromyalgie qu'il lui proposait. 

3. Le versement d'interets sur les indemnites tardives 

La Decision n° 206 A (18 aout 1988) traite de la question litigieuse que constitue I'obligation de la 
Commission de verser des interets sur les indemnites tardives ou sur celles retenues a tort. Ladite 
decision est importante dans le cadre du present expose sur les relations entre le Tribunal et la 
Commission parce qu'elle traite de fa?on exhaustive de la competence du Tribunal a I'egard de 
questions dont il est saisi avant que la Commission n'ait eu I'occasion de les examiner. 

Le jury de la Decision n° 206A a constate que les principes de droit regissant les interets sur les 
indemnites tardives ou retenues a tort avaient change au cours des dernieres annees et, apres les 

XXIV 



ANNEXE C 

avoir appliques a la Loi sur les accidents du travail, il a conclu que la Commission devait verser 
de tels interets. 

Apres avoir passe en revue la Decision n° 206A, le personnel de la CAT a informe son conseil 
d'administration qu'il n'etait pas d'accord sur le fait que la Commission etait tenue en vertu de la 
Loi de verser des interets, mais qu'elle avait alors la competence pour le faire. II lui a 
recommande de ne pas examiner la Decision n° 206A et d'approuver le versement d'interets sur les 
indemnites tardives ou celles retenues a tort, sans prejudice du fait qu'il estimait que la 
Commission n'etait pas tenue de verser de tels interets. 

Le conseil d'administration a accepte cette recommandation et a ordonne au personnel d'elaborer 
des recommandations en vue de la formulation d'un principe directeur sur le versement d'interets. 
A la fin de la periode visee par le present rapport, ces recommandations etaient toujours en 
attente. 



XXV 



ANNEXE C 

Section 1 



DIRECTIVE DE PROCEDURE N° 9 
OBJET: PENSIONS POUR DOULEUR CHRONIQUE 

1. La presente directive de procedure regit tous les appels en matiere de pension et toutes 
les demandes d'autorisation d'appel contre les decisions rendues par la Commission avant le 

1^"" octobre 1987. La date du \^^ octobre a ete choisie pour tenir compte de la periode posterieure 
au 3 juillet 1987, pendant laquelle la Commission devait mettre en place les mecanismes 
administratifs d'application du nouveau principe directeur sur la douleur chronique, a observer 
dans son processus decisionnel. 

2. Dans tous ces cas, lorsqu'il y a lieu de croire que I'invalidite du travailleur peut etre 
imputee en tout ou en grande partie a une douleur chronique, le cas est renvoye a la Commission 
pour qu'elle reexamine le dossier a la lumiere de son nouveau principe directeur en la matiere. Le 
Tribunal suspendra I'audition du cas jusqu'a ce qu'il connaisse la decision de la Commission 
concernant I'application de ce principe directeur au cas en instance. Une copie du dossier du 
travailleur sera communiquee a la Commission a cet effet. 

3. Lorsque, a la suite du renvoi, la Commission aura rendu une decision definitive, le 
Tribunal, a la demande de I'appelant ou du requerant, rouvrira le dossier. 

4. L'examen de I'admissibilite aux indemnites anterieure au 3 juillet 1987 sera egalement 
reporte dans ces cas jusqu'a ce que la Commission ait rendu la decision sur I'application de son 
principe directeur pour la periode posterieure a cette date. 

5. La presente directive de procedure repose sur la conviction qu'a le Tribunal que la 
Commission procedera avec diligence au reexamen de ces cas, eu egard au retard dont ils ont 
souffert jusqu'ici. Si le reexamen a entreprendre par la Commission accuse un retard 
deraisonnable, le Tribunal se reserve le droit de reprendre I'audition et le jugement de ces cas 
sans attendre la decision definitive de la Commission. 

6. Le Bureau des conseillers juridiques du Tribunal identifiera les dossiers a I'egard desquels 
I'application de ce principe directeur entrainera, a son avis, I'ajournement de I'appel ou de la 
demande. II demandera a la Commission de confirmer son intention de reexaminer ces dossiers. 
Une fois cette confirmation regue, il informera les parties interessees de son opinion quant a 
I'application probable de cette politique d'ajournement a leur dossier respectif. 

7. Les parties qui entendent contester I'application de la presente directive de procedure a 
leur dossier pourront se faire entendre par un jury d'audience du Tribunal sur les deux questions 
suivantes: 

a) La presente directive de procedure s'applique-t-elle dans sa forme actuelle a leur dossier? 

b) Dans I'affirmative et eu egard aux raisons qui president a la presente directive, y a-t-il 
des motifs suffisants pour accorder une exception a cette directive de procedure? 

XXVI 



ANNEXE C 

Section 1 

8. La presente directive de procedure s'applique peu importe I'etape a laquelle est rendu le 
processus d'identification, par le Tribunal, des questions de pension pour cause de douleur 
chronique et embrasse les quelques dossiers ayant deja fait I'objet d'audiences (mais a I'egard 
desquels aucune decision definitive n'a ete rendue a ce jour), sous reserve, bien entendu, de 
I'instruction des questions visees au paragraphe 7 ci-dessus, a la lumiere des observations faites 
par les parties en la matiere. 

9. Les appelants ou requerants peuvent agir conformement aux conseils du Bureau des 
conseillers juridiques du Tribunal et accepter sans protestation Tajournement de leur dossier 
respectif en attendant le reexamen de la Commission sans prejudice de leurs droits subsequents. 

10. Le Tribunal tient a souligner que le fait qu'il identifie un dossier comme etant soumis a 
I'application de la presente directive de procedure ne signifie pas que le Tribunal conclut a 
I'existence d'une douleur chronique ou d'une admissibilite aux indemnites pour cause de douleur 
chronique. Ces questions restent a trancher par la Commission, sous reserve d'appel devant le 
Tribunal. L'application de la presente directive de procedure signifie seulement que le Tribunal a 
releve des questions litigieuses en matiere de douleur chronique. 



EXPLICATION 

Historique 

La directive de procedure n° 9 vise les questions que posent au Tribunal les appels en matiere de 
pension (ainsi que les demandes d'autorisation d'interjeter appel dans ce domaine). 

Le Tribunal d'appel avait suspendu en decembre 1985 I'audition des appels en matiere de 
pension, en attendant la formulation de sa strategic de I'arret de principe concernant les appels en 
matiere d'evaluation des pensions. II s'agissait pour le Tribunal d'entendre un appel expressement 
choisi a cet effet et auquel participaient, outre les parties, la Commission des accidents du travail 
ainsi que des representants invites du patronat et des travailleurs et qui fournissaient au Tribunal 
renseignements, preuves et arguments sur les questions tres difficiles qui caracterisent les appels 
en matiere de pension. A Tissue de 27 jours d'audience, le Tribunal rendait sa Decision n° Q]5. 

La Decision n° 915 est un document volumineux, dans lequel les questions litigieuses des appels 
en matiere de pension sont analysees en detail, pour servir de points de reference aux jurys 
d'audience du Tribunal dans I'audition d'autres appels de meme nature. Elle porte sur deux 
questions principales: I'interpretation du paragraphe 45(1) et la douleur chronique. 

Dans la partie de la Decision no 915 consacree a la douleur chronique, le Tribunal a conclu qu'il y 
avait effectivement des cas d'invalidite dus a une douleur chronique enigmatique et que, si les 
conditions presidant a I'invalidite etablissaient un lien de cause a effet avec une lesion 
professionnelle anterieure, I'invalidite etait indemnisable. Ces conclusions allaient a I'encontre de 
celles de la Commission sur la meme question. Cependant, durant la periode au cours de laquelle 
le cas n° 915 etait entendu et juge, la Commission procedait a son propre reexamen du principe 
directeur sur la douleur chronique. La Decision n° 915 a ete rendue en mai 1987, et, le 
3 juillet 1987, le conseil d'administration de la CAT adoptait un principe directeur regissant 
I'indemnisation, par pension, des invalidites imputables a la douleur chronique resultant d'une 
lesion professionnelle. Ce principe directeur definit les troubles de douleur chronique et etablit 
des regies d'evaluation des pensions visant les invalidites imputables aux troubles de cette nature. 

XXVII 



ANNEXE C 

Section 1 

Le nouveau principe directeur de la Commission ne fait aucune mention de la Decision n° 915, 
dont la compatibilite avec ce principe directeur n'a pas encore ete mise a I'epreuve. 

De toute evidence, le nouveau principe directeur de la Commission sur la douleur chronique et la 
Decision n° 915 representent tous deux un changement de direction par rapport aux politiques 
anterieures des regimes d'indemnisation des accidents du travail du Canada. II est manifeste qu'ils 
marquent aussi le debut d'un processus de formulation de politiques qui promet d'etre long et 
difficile. II ressort de I'analyse de la Decision n° 915 et de la nature du nouveau principe directeur 
de la Commission que I'octroi de la pension aux travailleurs souffrant d'une invalidie imputable a 
la douleur chronique met en jeu des questions difficiles et complexes, auxquelles la reponse ne se 
degagera qu'au fur et a mesure de I'application du nouveau principe directeur a differents cas 
d'espece. 

En juillet 1987, le Tribunal a commence a inscrire au role d'audition les cas de pension qui 
avaient ete suspendus avant la Decision n° 915. A la date de cette directive de procedure, des 
audiences ont ete tenues pour un certain nombre de cas, mais aucune decision n'avait encore ete 
rendue. L'experience que les jurys d'audience ont tiree de ces cas a cependant servi a confirmer a 
quel point la douleur chronique pourrait etre un facteur dans les appels en matiere de pension et 
a convaincre davantage le Tribunal de la difficulty et de la complexity des points litigieux qu'il 
est appele a regler. 

C'est dans ce contexte que le Tribunal a ete amene a considerer les points de procedure faisant 
I'objet de la Directive de procedure n° 9. 

Motifs presidant a la directive 

Au cours des trois mois qui ont suivi I'adoption, par la Commission, de son nouveau principe 
directeur sur la douleur chronique, le Tribunal s'est rendu compte que le personnel de la Com- 
mission s'inquietait de ce que le role de cette derniere dans la formulation premiere de la 
politique d'indemnisation soit menace, en matiere de douleur chronique, par le fait que le 
Tribunal entende et juge, en premiere instance, des questions de pension pour cause de douleur 
chronique. Ce dernier fait s'expliquait par le nombre de decisions en matiere de pension portees 
en appel devant le Tribunal avant I'adoption du principe directeur de la Commission (environ 500 
cas). En fait, au cours d'un echange de vues entre I'avocat-conseil interimaire de la Commission 
et I'avocat-conseil du Tribunal, le personnel de la Commission a soutenu, en s'appuyant sur 
I'alinea 86g(2) de la Loi sur les accidents du travail, qu'a compter du 3 juillet 1987, la loi 
interdisait au Tribunal d'entendre les questions de pension pour cause de douleur chronique que 
la Commission n'avait pas eu I'occasion d'instruire a la lumiere de son nouveau principe directeur. 

Le Tribunal n'a eu, a ce jour, aucune occasion d'examiner, dans le contexte d'un cas d'espece, la 
question de sa competence pour entendre et juger des questions de pension pour cause de douleur 
chronique, sans que la Commission n'ait pu, apres le 3 juillet 1987, se prononcer la-dessus a la 
lumiere de son nouveau principe directeur sur la douleur chronique. Cependant, on peut cerner 
facilement les arguments en presence. On peut interpreter a bon droit I'alinea 86g(2) comme 
interdisant au Tribunal d'instruire, d'entendre ou de juger les appels en matiere de soins 
medicaux, de readaptation professionnelle, de droit aux indemnites ou aux prestations, de cotisa- 
tions, de penalites ou de transfert de depenses, a moins que les procedures que la Commission a 
mises au point n'aient ete epuisees a I'egard de ces litiges. L'argument avance a I'appui de la 
position prise par le personnel de la Commission semble etre qu'a compter du 3 juillet 1987, 
celle-ci a etabli une procedure pour I'audition des questions de pension pour cause de douleur 
chronique, et qu'a I'egard des memes questions jugees par la Commission avant le 
3 juillet et portees en appel devant le Tribunal, ces procedures n'avaient pas ete appliquees, et 
encore moins epuisees. On pourrait en conclure que le Tribunal a ete dessaisi de sa competence 

XXVIII 



ANNEXE C 

Section 1 

chronique dans ces cas a compter du 3 juillet, en attendant que la Commission puisse en decider a 
la lumiere de son nouveau principe directeur. 

L'argument contraire est tout aussi evident. La question de savoir si la procedure relative a un 
litige donne a ete epuisee doit etre jugee a la date de la decision portee en appel. Si toutes les 
procedures ont ete epuisees et que la decision est definitive a la date a laquelle elle est rendue, le 

droit d'interjeter appel en application de I'alinea 86o(l) s'applique, et la creation subsequente de 
procedures applicables par la Commission n'a aucun effet. 

Le Tribunal a ete egalement informe de I'intention du personnel de la Commission de faire 
reexaminer par cette derniere tous les dossiers de pension oil il est question de douleur chronique, 
en appel devant le Tribunal, pour instruire et juger cette derniere question par I'application du 
principe directeur de la Commission en la matiere. La Commission a demande au Tribunal de lui 
fournir la liste de tous ces dossiers a cet effet. Le Tribunal a ete aussi informe que dans le 
reexamen de ces dossiers, la Comm.ission instruira egalement toutes les questions connexes comme 
I'admissibilite aux supplements prevus aux paragraphes 45(5) et 45(7), la disponibilite des 
programmes de soins medicaux ou de readaptation professionnelle, etc. 

Pour eviter tout malentendu, il y a lieu de noter que la Commission ne prevoit pas donner a son 
nouveau principe directeur un effet retroactif a la periode anterieure au 3 juillet 1987. Elle 
n'examinera pas I'admissibilite aux prestations portant sur quelque periode que ce soit, anterieure 
a cette date. La question de la retroactivity des prestations de pension pour cause de douleur 
chronique avait ete mise de cote dans la Decision n° 015 en attendant un complement 
d'argumentation a ce sujet. Cette argumentation a ete entendue, et le jury qui a rendu la Decision 
n° 915 se penche en ce moment sur cette question. 

Tous les faits ci-dessus, y compris I'experience que le Tribunal a tiree de I'instruction des appels 
de pension mettant en jeu des questions relatives a la douleur chronique, lui ont permis 
d'identifier un certain nombre de problemes qui se poseraient au cas ou il rendrait des decisions 
en la matiere avant que la Commission n'ait eu I'occasion de considerer I'application de son 
nouveau principe directeur en ce domaine. Ces sujets de preoccupation sont enumeres ci-dessous. 
11 convient de noter que la question de competence n'y figure pas. Le Tribunal a toujours 
presume qu'il a la competence requise pour entendre I'appel porte contre toute decision definitive 
de la Commission, une fois que toutes les procedures en vigueur a ce moment-la ont ete epuisees, 
pour ce qui est des matieres visees aux alineas 86g(l)b) et c). Tant que cette interpretation de la 
competence du Tribunal n'aura pas ete contestee dans un cas d'espece, il estime qu'il est juste et 
necessaire de fonder son action sur la presomption que son interpretation de la competence du 
Tribunal est correcte. 

Void la liste des sujets de preoccupation du Tribunal: 

1. II est vrai que la substance du nouveau principe directeur sur la douleur chronique se 

degagera graduellement, dans les faits, de I'application de cette politique aux cas d'espece. Qui- 
conque assume le role de rendre en premiere instance les decisions portant application du principe 
directeur aux cas d'espece aura probablement une influence determinante sur la direction que 
prendra la formulation du principe directeur. Et quoi qu'on puisse penser des arguments con- 
tradictoires en matiere de competence dans les circonstances particulieres de ces cas, il est in- 
dubitable qu'en regie generate, I'Assemblee legislative entendait confier ce role premier a la 
Commission, et non au Tribunal. Voir la reconnaissance explicite de ce fait dans la Decision n° 3 
du Tribunal et dans le rapport provisoire du cas-type concernant les appels en matiere d'evalua- 
tion des pensions. La possibility pour le Tribunal d'assumer le role premier dans un grand nombre 

XXIX 



ANNEXE C 
Section 1 

d'anciens dossiers de pension pour cause de douleur chronique tient uniquement a des evenements 
fortuits particuliers qui ont conduit a I'adoption du nouveau principe directeur de la Commission. 

2. Si le Tribunal entreprend d'entendre ces cas sans qu'il y ait eu une decision en premiere 
instance de la Commission sur les questions de pension pour cause de douleur chronique, 
I'application du nouveau principe directeur a ces decisions sera decidee dans un processus oii une 
seule decision serait possible (sans compter le reexamen que prevoit le paragraphe 86n). Vu la 
difficulte, la nouveaute et la complexity des questions de cette nature, pareil processus n'est 
probablement pas suffisant. Cela est vrai du point de vue du systeme comme du point de vue des 
parties. 

3. En matiere de douleur chronique, comme en d'autres matieres, il est particulierement 
difficile, en I'absence de I'apport en premiere instance de la Commission, de regler les questions 
de traitement possible, de disponibilite des moyens de readaptation professionnelle et 
d'admissibilite aux supplements. Abstraction faite de la competence, il s'agit la de questions qui, 
de par leur nature, requierent I'instruction en premiere instance de la Commission et que, par 
ailleurs, le Tribunal a pour regie de renvoyer a la Commission pour instruction en premiere 
instance, chaque fois qu'elles se posent en premier lieu devant le Tribunal a la suite d'une conclu- 
sion a Tadmissibilite aux prestations. 

4. Pour ce qui est de devaluation des prestations de pension pour cause de douleur 
chronique, il est probable que, par les motifs exposes en detail dans la Decision n° QJ5, le jury 
d'audience du Tribunal devra s'appuyer sur une reevaluation des pensions de la part des medecins 
de la Commission, pour etre en mesure de tirer sa propre conclusion. Par ailleurs, en vue d'eviter 
I'emergence de deux systemes d'evaluation des pensions en matiere de douleur chronique, I'un 
applique par la Commission et I'autre par le Tribunal, il est vraiment essentiel que le Tribunal 
soit en mesure de reexaminer revaluation faite par la Commission dans les cas d'espece, plutot 
que de proceder a sa propre evaluation. II est vrai que dans la Decision n° 915, le Tribunal a 
effectue lui-meme revaluation, mais il I'a fait a la lumiere du temoignage des medecins de la 
Commission et a un moment oii la Commission n'avait aucun principe directeur en matiere 
d'evaluation en cas de douleur chronique. II s'ensuit que quand bien meme le Tribunal 
entreprendrait d'entendre les cas en suspens sans attendre le reexamen de la Commission, il est a 
peu pres certain que les jurys d'audience renverraient regulierement, la question de revaluation 
tout au moins, a la Commission pour decision en premiere instance. 

5. II appert done, par les motifs exposes aux paragraphes 3 et 4 ci-dessus, que ces questions 
tres importantes seront presque certainement renvoyees a la Commission dans presque tous les cas 
de pension pour cause de douleur chronique, quelle que soit la suite reservee aux questions de 
procedure. 

6. La decision prise par la Commission de reexaminer elle-meme I'application eventuelle de 
son nouveau principe directeur sur la douleur chronique aux cas de pension actuellement en appel 
devant le Tribunal fait que, si ce dernier suit la voie normale, il entendra les appels interjetes 
contre des decisions originales de la Commission, tout en sachant qu'elle s'apprete a en rendre de 
nouvelles. Les decisions rendues par le Tribunal et les nouvelles decisions de la Commission 
risquent de paraitre en meme temps. Les nouvelles decisions de la Commission seront susceptibles 
d'appel devant le Tribunal, et il est probable que la Commission les considerera comme se 
substituant aux decisions originales. Dans ce contexte, le statut de la decision rendue par le 
Tribunal en appel de la decision originale de la Commission est pour le moins incertain. 

7. Les choses etant ce qu'elles sont, en particulier en cette premiere etape de la formulation 
des concepts touchant la douleur chronique, on peut raisonnablement prevoir que les nouvelles 

XXX 



ANNEXE C 

Section 1 

decisions de la Commission et les decisions rendues par le Tribunal en appel des decisions 
originales de cette derniere n'auront pas toujours la meme conclusion, qu'il s'agisse des questions 
de fait, des questions de droit ou des questions medicales. 

8. Les perspectives de confusion tenant aux circonstances exposees aux paragraphes 6 et 7 

sont tres nettes, de meme que les perspectives de contestation en justice, sans parler d'une 
nouvelle periode de retard et d'incertitude. Vu la complexite et la difficulte des questions 
d'indemnisation des cas de pension pour cause de douleur chronique et vu le retard dont souf- 
frent deja les cas en suspens, le Tribunal estime qu'il est essentiel que la formulation des regies de 
droit et des principes directeurs en la matiere suive son cours de la maniere la plus simple 
possible. Une telle condition est de premiere importance, non seulement du point de vue des 
parties, mais aussi du point de vue du systeme d'indemnisation des accidents du travail. 

Par tous ces motifs, le Tribunal conclut qu'il est necessaire d'adopter, a I'egard des appels en 
matiere de pension, une procedure par laquelle il ne sera saisi des questions de pension pour cause 
de douleur chronique qu'apres que la Commission aura eu I'occasion de les examiner a la lumiere 
de son nouveau principe directeur. La directive de procedure ci-dessus a ete etablie a cet effet. 

Fait a Toronto, le 23 octobre 1987 

Tribunal d'appel des accidents du travail 

S.R. Ellis, President 



XXXI 



TRIBUNAL D'APPEL DES ACCIDENTS DU TRAVAIL 

TROISIEME RAPPORT 

ANNEXE D 

STATISTIQUES SUR LA RECEPTION DES NOUVEAUX DOSSIERS 



1. Repartition mensuelle des dossiers re^us 

2. Repartition des dossiers selon les categories d'appels 

3. Repartition des dossiers selon les categories d'appels 
(periode de 39 mois) 



REPARTITION MENSUELLE DES DOSSIERS RE^US 



ANNEXE D 



DESCRIPTION 



Total 

Exercice 

precedent 



* 10-87 11-87 12-87 01-88 02-88 03-88 04-88 05-88 06-88 07-88 08-88 09-88 10-88 11- 



Total 39 mois 
Periode a partir Total 
actuel le d'octobre 1985 
% 



APPELS PAR CATEGORIE: 



Paragraphe 86o 




120 


7 


1 


9 


4 


11 


6 


3 


4 


10 


4 


4 


4 


4 


2 


4 


77 


484 


7,5% 


Article 15 




97 


10 


6 


9 


8 


8 


8 


3 


8 


3 


10 


3 


14 


2 


4 


7 


103 


322 


5,0% 


Article 21 




79 


4 


8 


4 


1 


5 




14 


9 


7 


8 


4 


3 


10 


5 


1 


87 


210 


3,3% 


Article 77 




317 


28 


18 


25 


32 


21 


25 


19 


23 


23 


32 


13 


16 


16 


14 


21 


325 


754 


11,9% 


Pens i ons 




192 


8 


6 


8 


9 


3 




1 





2 








2 





1 





44 


588 


9,1% 


Rachat 




15 


2 


2 


4 


1 


2 




1 





4 





1 


6 








2 


25 


43 


o,r/. 


Evaluation de I 


'employeur 


29 








2 


1 


2 
















1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


14 


67 


1,0% 


Revision judicial re 


7 






















2 


1 




















4 


13 


0,2% 


Requete de ro<nbudsman 


48 





7 


11 





6 


10 


7 


8 


12 


4 


5 


19 


4 


2 


8 


103 


156 


2,4% 


Reexamen 




48 


5 


3 


7 


8 


8 




9 


5 


1 


2 


7 


5 


9 


5 


12 


93 


148 


2,3% 


Non-competence 




54 


3 








2 


1 







3 


3 


2 





2 








1 


22 


234 


3,5% 


Admissibi I i te 




877 


58 


54 


66 


87 


72 


90 


51 


76 


65 


90 


55 


61 


55 


57 


85 


1 033 


3 417 


53,1% 


Total 




1 876 


125 


105 


145 


153 


139 


163 


108 


138 


131 


152 


94 


133 


112 


91 


142 


1 931 


6 439 


100,0% 



Paragraphe 860 - Requetes d' autori sat ion d'appel 

Article 15 - Requete en vue d'une decision sur le droit d'intenter une action civile 

Article 21 • Requete d'un travaiUeur s'opposant a un examen medical exige par son employeur 

Article 77 - Appel des decisions de la CAT concernant I'acces aux dossiers des travailleurs 

Pension - Appel relatif a une pension pour invalidite partielle a caractere permanent 

Rachat - Appel des decisions de la CAT sur une requete d'un travailleur pour le paiement d'une somme forfaitaire au lieu de versements 

Evaluation de I'employeur - Appel par I'employeur des decisions d'evaluation de la CAT 

Revision judiciaire ■ Requete a la cour di vi sionnai re pour demander la revision d'une decision du Tribunal 

Requete de I ' ombudsman - Demande de I 'ombudsman a la suite de plaintes touchant les decisions du Tribunal 

Reexamen ■ Requete au Tribunal pour reexaminer une decision du Tribunal 

Non-competence - Dossier considere, a une etape prel iminai re, comme n'etant pas de la competence du Tribunal 

Admissibiite et autres - Appel des decisions de la CAT sur I 'admissibi I i te aux indemnites et sur le montant des pensions et questions diverses 



Avant les ajustements annuels - 23 cas pour la premi' 
A la date de reception des dossiers de la CAT 



re periode visee et 22 cas pour la seconde periode 



XXXII 



ANNEXE D 



_j 

u 

Q. 
0. 
< 
Q 
U 

or. 
m 

O 

z 



REPARTITION DES DOSSIERS PAR CAT^GORIE D'APPELS 

Octobre 1987 a decembre 1988 




Oct. nov. d6c. Jan. f6v. mars ovr. mai juin juil. aoot sept. oct. nov. d^c. 



MOIS 



[^] A. 15 mj A.21 m A.77 ^Admiss. 



Post, aux decisions [^ Par. 86o 



XXXIII 



ANNEXE D 



REPARTITION DES DOSSIERS PAR CATEGORIE D'APPELS 

Periode de 39 mois 



PENSION ET RACHAT (9.8%) 



AU STADE POSTERIEUR ♦ (4.9%) 



A. 77 (1 1.9%) 



A. 21 (3.3%) 



Par. 86o (7.4%) 

A. 15 (5.0%) 




ADMISSIBILITY (57.7%) 



*Le stade posterieur awe decisions comprend les requetes de reexamen, les requites 
de I'ombudsman et les cos de revision judiciaire. 



XXXIV 



TRIBUNAL DAPPEL DES ACCIDENTS DU TRAVAIL 
TROISIEME RAPPORT 

ANNEXE E 
STATISTIQUES DE PRODUCTION 



1. Production mensuelle 

2. Charge de travail mensuelle 

3. Sommaire de la charge de 
travail en cours 

4. Evolution des entries et des sorties 



PRODUCTION MENSUELLE 



PROGRESSION MENSUELLE 



ANNEXE E 



ENTREE: 

Nombre de dossiers 



Total 

Exercice 

precedent 10-87 11-87 12-87 01-88 02-88 03- 



04-88 05-88 06-88 07-88 08-88 09-88 10-88 11-88 12-88 



1 P76 125 105 K5 153 139 163 108 138 131 152 



133 112 91 U2 



Total 39 mois Cumul . 
a ce jour a partir totale 
15 mois d'Oct. 1985 



SORTIE: 

Dossiers retires 

Dossiers ne relevant pas de 

la competence du Tribunal 

Autres 

Dossiers inactifs 

Dossiers r^gl^s 

Dossiers au stade post^rieur 

^ la decision a 

Rdglement par jury-conseil 

Total, rdglement sans audience A 

Decisions definitives rendues B 

NOMBRE TOTAL DES DOSSIERS R^GL^S 
(A+B) tt 



286 


13 


18 


15 


19 


17 


37 


19 


23 


21 


11 


11 


34 


18 


30 


25 


311 


744 


16,5% 


78 


1 


5 


1 





5 


7 


2 





16 


6 


9 


3 


5 


3 


2 


65 


305 


6,8% 


11 


1 








1 


2 


7 


8 


7 


3 


6 


2 


2 


12 


8 


42 


101 


116 


2,6% 


80 


9 


2 


4 


3 


3 


23 





1 


5 


4 


1 


6 


16 


4 





81 


161 


3,6% 


51 


9 


5 


13 


9 


7 


10 


14 


6 


16 


12 


9 


7 


4 


8 


5 


134 


190 


4,2% 


45 





4 


11 


6 


4 


8 


3 


10 


8 


7 


10 


9 


15 


11 


12 


118 


163 


3,6% 


2 




















Q 





























3 


0.1% 


* 553 


33 


34 


44 


38 


38 


92 


46 


47 


69 


46 


42 


61 


70 


64 


86 


810 


1 682 


37,3% 


i 952 


70 


92 


138 


82 


112 


121 


108 


133 


134 


115 


96 


103 


98 


80 


149 


1 631 


2 833 


62,7% 


! 1 505 


103 


126 


182 


120 


150 


213 


154 


180 


203 


161 


138 


164 


168 


K4 


235 


2 441 


4 515 


100,0% 



Avant les ajustements annuels aux appels re?us - 23 cas pour la premiere periode visee et 22 cas pour la seconde p^riode vis^e 

Les colonnes n'indiquent que les ajouts mensuels 

Ces reglements portent sur les requetes de reexamen, les demandes de I 'ombudsman et les requetes 

de revision judicial re 

Sauf les decisions provisoires et les decisions sur les requetes de reexamen 



XXXV 



ANNEXE E 



CHARGE DE TRAVAIL MENSUELLE 



A la fin de 
































I 'exercice 
































precedent 


10/30 


11/30 


12/31 


01/29 


02/26 


04/01 


04/29 


05/27 


07/01 


07/29 


08/26 


09/30 


10/28 


11/25 


12/30 


le 30 sept. 


1987 


1987 


1987 


1988 


1988 


1988 


1988 


1988 


1988 


1988 


1988 


1988 


1988 


1988 


1988 


1987 

































DOSSIERS ■ STAOE PREALA8LE: * 1 631 1 643 1 643 1 652 1 692 1 706 1 688 1 670 1 695 1 648 1 661 1 657 1 640 1 591 1 539 1 510 

DOSSIERS ■ STAOE POSTERIEUR: 
En suspens 

Coniplets mais en attente 
Decision au stade de la redaction 

NOMBRE TOTAL DE DOSSIERS AU STADE 
POSTERIEUR A L 'AUDIENCE 

CHARGE DE TRAVAIL TOTALE 



68 

165 

1 525 


63 

177 
531 


64 
172 
526 


62 
182 
489 


61 
195 
468 


58 
172 
445 




53 
163 
445 


54 
145 
416 




49 
147 
377 




39 
124 
355 


36 
128 
352 




39 

107 
340 




49 
100 
333 


46 
106 
321 


46 
116 
315 


43 

101 
270 


758 


771 


762 


733 


724 


675 




661 


615 




573 




518 


516 




486 




482 


473 


477 


414 


2 389 


2 414 


2 405 


2 385 


2 416 


2 381 


2 


349 


2 285 


2 


268 


2 


166 


2 177 


2 


143 


2 


122 


2 064 


2 016 


1 924 



Note: 

* Ces Chi ff res comprennent les cas de pension pour douleur chronique 



XXXVI 



ANNEXE E 



RESUME DE LA CHARGE DE TRAVAIL EN COURS 

a la fin de la periode terminee 
le 30 decembre 1988 



Entree de dossiers en 39 mois 6 439 

Sortie de dossiers en 39 mois 4 515 



Charge de travail en cours a la fin de la periode couverte: 

au stade prealable a I'audience 1510 

au stade posterieur a I'audience 414 

charge de travail totale en cours 1 924 



XXXVII 



ANNEXE E 



GRAPHIQUE DE L'EVOLUTION 
DES DOSSIERS DE LENTR^E A LA SORTIE 



ANALYSE D'CVOLUTION SUR TROIS ANS 



UJ 

a. 

Q. 

< 

b 
u 

IT 
OQ 

O 

z 



700 



600 - 



500 - 



400 



300 



200 



100 - 




"1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 

1986 1986 1986 1986 1987 1987 1987 1987 1988 19J 

TRIMESTRIEL 



1988 1988 



▼ Decisions et non-audiences 

"T" Audiences et non-audiences 

MH Entrees 

A Decisions 

/\ Audiences 



XXXVIII 



TRIBUNAL D'APPEL DES ACCIDENTS DU TRAVAIL 
TROISIEME RAPPORT 

ANNEXE F 
DETAILS BUDG^TAIRES 



\. Etat des d^penses - 9 mois 

2. Rapport d'^cart - 9 mois 

3. Etat des d^penses - 12 mois 

4. Rapport d'^cart - 12 mois 



ANNEXE F 



ETAT DETAILLE DES DEFENSES 

Pour la p^riode de neuf mois finissant le 31 d^cembre 1988 

(en milliers de dollars) 



BUDGET 


DEPENSES 


ANNUEL 


REELLES 


04/88 


04/88 


a 12/88 


a 12/88 



SALAIRES ET TRAITEMENTS 

1310 SALAIRES ET TRAITEMENTS 
1320 SALAIRES ET TRAITEMENTS 
1325 SALAIRES ET TRAITEMENTS 
1510 AIDE TEMPORAIRE 
1520 AIDE TEMPORAIRE 



HEURES NORMALES 
HEURES SUPPLEMENTAIRES 
TRAVAILLEURS CONTRACTUELS 

GOUVERNEMENT 

ORGANISMES EXTERNES 



TOTAL, SALAIRES ET TRAITEMENTS 



AVANTAGES SOCIAUX 

2110 REGIME DE PENSIONS DU CANADA 

2130 ASSURANCE -CHoMAGE 

2220 CAISSE DE RETRAITE DES FONCTIONNAIRES 

2230 FONDS DE RAJUSTEMENT, CAISSE DE RETRAITE DES FONCTIONNAIRES 

2260 OBLIGATIONS FLOTTANTES, CAISSE DE RETRAITE DES FONCTIONNAIRES 

2310 REGIME D'ASSURANCE-MALADIE DE I 'ONTARIO 

2320 REGIME D'ASSURANCE-MALADIE COMPLEMENTAIRE 

2330 REGIME DE PROTECTION DU REVENU 

2340 ASSURANCE-VIE COLLECTIVE 

2350 ASSURANCE DENTAIRE 

2410 INDEMNISATION DES ACCIDENTS DU TRAVAIL 

2520 PRESTATIONS SUPPLEMENTAIRES DE MATERNITE 

2990 TRANSFERT DES PRESTATIONS (16,58 %) 

TOTAL, AVANTAGES SOCIAUX 



TRANSPORTS ET COMMUNICATIONS 

3110 MESSAGERIE ET LIVRAISON 

3111 INTERURBAINS 

3112 TELEPHONE; SERVICE, MATERIEL 
3210 AFFRANCHISSEMENT POSTAL 

3410 FRAIS DE REINSTALLATIONS D'EMPLOYES 
3610 DEPLACEMENTS - REPAS ET HEBERGEMENT 
3620 DEPLACEMENTS - AVION 
3630 DEPLACEMENTS - TRAIN 
3640 DEPLACEMENTS - AUTOMOBILE 



3 015,0 


2 


967,0 


37,5 




40,5 


360,0 




208,5 


52,5 




37,2 


52,5 




136,8 


3 517,5 


3 


390,0 



0.0 


38,1 


0.0 


75,0 


0.0 


76,1 


0.0 


15,7 


0.0 


0.0 


0,0 


36,3 


0.0 


20.1 


0.0 


15.6 


0.0 


7.0 


0.0 


20.3 


0.0 


1.1 


0.0 


38.3 


0,0 


0,0 


465,8 


343,8 



33,8 


25,1 


11,3 


10,1 


45.0 


37.2 


40,5 


31.8 


7,5 


0,0 


75,0 


35.0 


0.0 


25,7 


0.0 


0.8 


0,0 


15.0 



XXXIX 



ANNEXE F 



3660 DEPLACEMENTS - CONFERENCES ET COLLOGUES 

3680 DEPLACEMENTS - PARTICIPATION AUX AUDIENCES 

3690 DEPLACEMENTS - PROGRAMMES DE RAYONNEMENT 

3720 DEPLACEMENTS - AUTRES 

3721 DEPLACEMENTS - PRESIDENT, VICE-PRESIDENT ET REPRESENTANTS 

TOTAL, TRANSPORTS ET COMMUNICATIONS 



SERVICES 

4120 RELATIONS PUBLIQUES 

4130 PUBLICITE - EMPLOIS 

4210 LOCATION - MATERIEL INFORMATIQUE 

4220 LOCATION - MATERIEL DE BUREAU 

4230 LOCATION - FOURNITURES DE BUREAU 

4240 LOCATION - PHOTOCOPIEUR 

4260 LOCATION - BUREAUX 

4261 LOCATION - SALLES D 'AUDIENCE 
4270 LOCATION - AUTRES 

4310 TRAITEMENT DES DONNEES 
4320 ASSURANCE 

4340 RECEPTIONS - HOSPITALITE 

4341 RECEPTIONS - LOCATION 

4350 INDEMNISATION DES TEMOINS 

4351 SIGNIFICATION DES BREFS ET ASSIGNATIONS 

4360 FORFAITS QUOTIDIENS - VICE-PRES. ET REPRES. A TEMPS PARTIEL 
4410 CONSEILLERS - SERVICES DE GESTION 
4420 CONSEILLERS - CONCEPTION DE SYSTlMES 

4430 SERVICES DE STENOGRAPHIE JUDICIAIRE 

4431 CONSEILLERS - SERVICES JURIDIQUES 
4435 TRANSCRIPTION 

4440 FORFAITS QUOTIDIENS DES MEDECINS, PROVISIONS/RAPPORTS 

4460 SERVICES DE LA RECHERCHE 

4470 IMPRESSION DES DECISIONS, BULLETINS ET BROCHURES 

4520 REPARATIONS ET ENTRETIEN - FOURNITURES ET MATERIEL DE BUREAU 

4710 AUTRES - Y COMPRIS COTISATIONS 

4711 SERVICES DE TRADUCTION ET D ' INTERPRETATION 

4712 PERFECTIONNEMENT PROFESSIONNEL - DROITS DE SCOLARITE 

4713 SERVICES DE TRADUCTION - EN FRANQAIS 

4714 AUTRES COUTS DES SERVICES EN FRANQAIS 

TOTAL, SERVICES 

FOURNITURES ET MATERIEL 

5090 PROJECTEURS, CAMERAS, ECRANS 

5110 MATERIEL INFORMATIQUE ET LOGICIELS 

5120 AMEUBLEMENT ET MATERIEL DE BUREAU 

5130 MACHINES DE BUREAU 

5710 FOURNITURES DE BUREAU 

5720 LIVRES, PUBLICATIONS ET RAPPORTS 

TOTAL, FOURNITURES ET MATERIEL 

TOTAL, DEPENSES DE FONCTIONNEMENT 

DEPENSES D' IMMOBILISATION 

DEPENSES TOTALES 



18,8 


19.3 


26.3 


28,7 


6.0 


A. 2 


0.0 


1.2 


41,3 


30,3 


305,3 


264,3 



0.0 


0.0 


7.5 


14.7 


0.0 


57.2 


7.5 


6.2 


0.8 


1.3 


67.5 


89,6 


600,0 


660,6 


15,0 


12,2 


0.8 


0.0 


18.8 


14.5 


3.8 


0,0 


15.0 


34.6 


0.0 


0.5 


22.5 


15.6 


4,5 


2,7 


375,0 


292,9 


18.8 


53,3 


0.0 


55.4 


90.0 


79.9 


18,8 


2,0 


75,0 


58,0 


225,0 


138,3 


3.8 


0,0 


150,0 


89.0 


11,3 


39.7 


22.5 


47.8 


45,0 


35.7 


45,0 


20.3 


56,3 


31.0 


0,0 


0,0 


1 899,8 


1 853,2 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


22.5 


0.0 


7.5 


0.0 


37,5 


89.6 


30,0 


37,1 


97,5 


126,8 


6 285,8 


5,978,0 


337,5 


307,6 


6 623,3 


6 285,6 



XL 



ANNEXE F 



RAPPORT DtCART 

Pour la periode de neuf mois terminee 
le 31 decembre 1988 
(en milliers de dollars) 



Salaires et 
traitements 

Avantages sociaux 

Transports 

et communications 

Services 

Fournitures 
et materiel 



Budget Depenses 

annuel reelles 

1987-1988 1987-1988 



3 517,5 3 390,0 

465,8 343,8 



305,3 



264,3 



1 899,8 1 853,2 



ECART 

$ % 



97,5 



126,8 



127,5 
122,0 

41,0 
46,6 

-29,3 



3,6 
26,2 

13,4 
2,5 

-30,0 



Depenses totales 
de fonctionnement 



6 285,8 5 978,0 



307,9 



4,9 



Depenses 
d'immobilisation 



337,5 



307,6 



29,9 



8,9 



Depenses totales 



6 623,3 6 285,6 



337,8 



5,1 



XLI 



ANNEXE F 



ETAT DETAILLE DBS DEFENSES 

Pour la periode de 12 mois terminee le 31 mars 1988 
(en milliers de dollars) 



Budget Depenses 
annuel reelles 
1987/88 1987/88 



SALAIRES ET TRAITEMENTS 



1310 SALAIRES ET TRAITEMENTS 

1320 SALAIRES ET TRAITEMENTS 

1325 SALAIRES ET TRAITEMENTS 

1510 AIDE TEMPORAIRE - GOUVERNEMENT 

1520 AIDE TEMPORAIRE - ORGANISMES EXTERNES 



HEURES NORMALES 
HEURES SUPPLEMENTAIRES 
TRAVAILLEURS CONTRACTUELS 



TOTAL, SALAIRES ET TRAITEMENTS 



AVANTAGES SOCIAUX 

2110 REGIME DE PENSIONS DU CANADA 

2130 ASSURANCE-CH6MAGE 

2220 CAISSE DE RETRAITE DES FONCTIONNAIRES 

2230 FONDS DE RAJUSTEMENT, CAISSE DE RETRAITE DES FONCTIONNAIRES 

2260 OBLIGATIONS FLOTTANTES, CAISSE DE RETRAITE DES FONCTIONNAIRES 

2310 REGIME D'ASSURANCE-MALADIE DE L'ONTARIO 

2320 REGIME D'ASSURANCE-MALADIE COMPLEMENTAIRE 

2330 REGIME DE PROTECTION DU REVENU 

2340 ASSURANCE-VIE COLLECTIVE 

2350 ASSURANCE DENTAIRE 

2410 INDEMNISATION DES ACCIDENTS DU TRAVAIL 

2520 PRESTATIONS SUPPLEMENTAIRES DE MATERNITE 

2990 TRANSFERT DES PRESTATIONS (16,58 %) 

TOTAL, AVANTAGES SOCIAUX 



TRANSPORTS ET COMMUNICATIONS 

3110 MESSAGERIE ET LIVRAISON 

3111 INTERURBAINS 

3112 TELEPHONE : SERVICE, MATERIEL 
3210 AFFRANCHISSEMENT POSTAL 

3410 FRAIS DE REINSTALLATION D'EMPLOYES 
3610 DEPLACEMENTS - REPAS ET HEBERGEMENT 



3620 DEPLACEMENTS 
3630 DEPLACEMENTS 
3640 DEPLACEMENTS 
3660 DEPLACEMENTS 
3680 DEPLACEMENTS 



AVION 

TRAIN 

AUTOMOBILE 

CONFERENCES ET COLLOQUES 

PARTICIPATION AUX AUDIENCES 



3 706,8 


3 303,3 


25,0 


52,4 


0,0 


511,5 


0,0 


71,0 


150,0 


205,4 


3 881,8 


4 143,6 


0,0 


45,6 


0,0 


85,9 


0,0 


79,9 


0,0 


17,0 


0,0 


0,0 


0,0 


42,4 


0,0 


18,9 


0,0 


15,2 


0,0 


7,7 


0,0 


19,4 


0,0 


0,2 


0,0 


6,3 


0,0 


0,7 


577,8 


339,0 


25,0 


51,6 


15,0 


16,1 


50,0 


40,8 


60,0 


59,3 


0,0 


0,0 


180,0 


51,4 


0,0 


29,6 


0.0 


1.3 


0,0 


21,3 


15,0 


20,0 


150,0 


39,6 



XLII 



3690 DEPLACEMENTS - PROGRAMMES DE RAYONNEMENT 

3720 DEPLACEMENTS - AUTRES 

3721 DEPLACEMENTS - PRESIDENT, VICE-PRESIDENTS ET REPRESENTANTS 

TOTAL, TRANSPORTS ET COMMUNICATIONS 



SERVICES 



546,0 



ANNEXE F 



25,0 


3.6 


2,0 


1,3 


24,0 


58,7 



394,7 



4120 RELATIONS PUBLIOUES 10,0 

4130 PUBLICITE - EMPLOIS 2,0 

4210 LOCATION - MATERIEL INFORMATIQUE 40,0 

4220 LOCATION - MATERIEL DE BUREAU 7,5 

4230 LOCATION - FOURNITURES DE BUREAU 0,0 

4240 LOCATION - PHOTOCOPIEUR 90,0 

4260 LOCATION - BUREAUX 643,1 

4261 LOCATION - SALLES D'AUDIENCE 25,0 
4270 LOCATION - AUTRES 8,0 
4310 TRAITEMENT DES DONNEES 10,0 
4320 ASSURANCE 5,0 

4340 RECEPTIONS - HOSPITALITE 15,0 

4341 RECEPTIONS - LOCATION 0,0 

4350 INDEMNISATION DES TEMOINS 50,0 

4351 SIGNIFICATION DES BREFS ET ASSIGNATIONS 5,0 
4360 INDEMNITES JOURNALlERES - VICE-PRES. ET REPRES. A TEMPS PARTIEL 750,0 
4410 CONSEILLERS - SERVICES DE GESTION 50,0 
4420 CONSEILLERS - CONCEPTION DE SYST^MES 0,0 

4430 SERVICES DE STENOGRAPHIE JUDICIAIRE 180,0 

4431 CONSEILLERS - SERVICES JURIDIQUES 80,0 
4435 TRANSCRIPTION 100,0 
4440 INDEMNITES JOURNALlERES DES MEDECINS, PROVISIONS/RAPPORTS 400,0 
4460 SERVICES DE LA RECHERCHE 10,0 
4470 IMPRESSION DES DECISIONS, BULLETINS ET BROCHURES 180,0 
4520 REPARATIONS ET ENTRETIEN -FOURNITURES ET MATERIEL DE BUREAU 8,0 

4710 AUTRES - Y COMPRIS COT I SAT IONS 12,0 

4711 SERVICES DE TRADUCTION ET D ' INTERPRETATION 75,0 

4712 PERFECTIONNEMENT PROFESSIONNEL - DROITS DE SCOLARITE 64,0 

4713 SERVICES DE TRADUCTION - EN FRANQAIS 90,0 
4990 MINISTERE DU TRAVAIL 100,0 



TOTAL, SERVICES 

FOURNITURES ET MATERIEL 

5090 PROJECTEURS, CAMERAS, ECRANS 

5110 MATERIEL INFORMATIQUE ET LOGICIELS 

5120 AMEUBLEMENT ET MATERIEL DE BUREAU 

5130 MACHINES DE BUREAU 

5710 FOURNITURES DE BUREAU 

5720 LIVRES, PUBLICATIONS ET RAPPORTS 

TOTAL, FOURNITURES ET MATERIEL 

TOTAL, DEPENSES DE FONCTIONNEMENT 

DEPENSES D' IMMOBILISATION 

DEPENSES TOTALES 



5 





15 





55 


1 


39 





4 


1 


90 


6 


738 


1 


19 


4 





7 


62 


2 








25 


7 








29 


9 


7 


6 


471 


1 


9 


5 








110 


3 


12 


8 


44 


2 


206 


2 





3 


177 


4 


24 


9 


52 


9 


54 


8 


31 


1 


31 


5 









3 009,6 


2 


319,6 


3,0 




0,5 


0,0 




1,0 


50,0 




5,5 


10,0 




1,5 


100,0 




127,0 


50,0 




46,4 


213,0 




181,9 


8 228,2 


7 


378,9 


1 650,0 


1 


549,6 


9 878,2 


8 


928, 



XLIII 



ANNEXE F 



RAPPORT DtCART 

Pour la periode de 12 mois terminee 
le 31 decembre 1988 
(en milliers de dollars) 



Budget 
annuel 
1987-1988 



Depenses 

reelles 

1987-1988 



Depenses totales 



9 878,2 



8 928,5 



ECART 

$ % 



Salaires 

et traitements 


3 881,8 


4 


143,6 


-261,8 


-6,7 


Avantages sociaux 


577,3 




339,0 


238,8 


41,3 


Transports 

et communications 


546,0 




394,7 


151,3 


27,7 


Services 


3 009,6 


2 


319,6 


690,0 


22,9 


Fournitures 
et materiel 


213,0 




181,9 


31,1 


14,6 


Depenses totales 
de fonctionnement 


8 228,2 


7 


378,9 


849,3 


10,3 


Depenses 
d'immobilisation 


1 650,0 


1 


549,6 


100,4 


6,1 



949,7 



9,6 



XLIV 



TRIBUNAL D'APPEL DES ACCIDENTS DU TRAVAIL 
TROISIEME RAPPORT 

ANNEXE G 
PROFIL DES REPRESENTANTS 



ANNEXE G 



PROFIL DBS REPRESENTANTS DES EMPLOYEURS' 



Type de representation 




Nombre de cas 


Sans representant 




1 274 


Personnel de I'entreprise 




402 


Avocat 




467 


Autre 




649 


Bureau des conseillers du 


patronat 


95 


Depute provincial 








Pourcentage du total 

44,1 

1,9 

16,2 

22,5 
3,3 




Total des cas traites en 
audience 



2 887 



100,0 



PROFIL DES REPRESENTANTS DES TRAVAILLEURS* 



Type de representation 


Nombre de cas 


Syndicat 


531 


Sans representant 


492 


Avocat 


660 


Autre 


474 


Bureau des conseillers des 




travailleurs 


605 


Depute provincial 


125 



Pourcentage du total 

18,4 
17,0 
22,9 
16,4 

21,0 
4,3 



Total des cas traites en audience 



2 887 



100,0 



* Renseignements fournis par les decisions rendues par le Tribunal. 



Dans le Deuxieme rapport, les renseignements avaient ete recueillis dans les dossiers au stade de la reception. L'experience 
nous a prouve que les types de representation peuvent differer en cours de procedures et que les renseignements recueillis au 
debut peuvent s'averer inexacts et donner une fausse indication du type de representation lors de I'audience. 



XLV 



TRIBUNAL D'APPEL DES ACCIDENTS DU TRAVAIL 
TROISIEME RAPPORT 

ANNEXE H 
ANALYSE DE LA CHARGE DE TRAVAIL HEBDOMADAIRE 



A7 




31 


78 




20 







7 




32 


39 







31 


31 



ANNEXE H 
ANALYSE DE LA CHARGE DE TRAVAIL HEBDOMADAJRE 

Au 30 decembre 1988 



1. RECEPTION DES NOUVEAUX DOSSIERS 

- Pas encore prets pour le traitement par le BCJT: 

- Dossiers en attente du traitement initial - pas d'acheminement (note 3) 70 

- Dossiers en attente (acheminement termine): 

Pas prets pour le BCJT - periode d'attente 

Pas prets pour le BCJT - travailleur sans representant 

2. RECEPTION - DOSSIERS EN COURS DE TRAITEMENT INITIAL: 

Article 15 
Article 21 

Article 77 - Observations ecrites 

- En cours de traitement 
Article 86o - Observations ecrites 

- En cours de traitement 

NOMBRE TOTAL DE NOUVEAUX DOSSIERS 238 

3. TRAITEMENT PAR LE BCJT: 

Attendant une affectation a un conseiller juridique (note 8) 84 

DC et preparation du cas en cours (note 4) 94 

En attente au BCJT 76 

NOMBRE TOTAL DE DOSSIER AFFECTES AU BCJT 170 

NOMBRE TOTAL DE DOSSIERS AU STADE PREALABLE A L 'AUDIENCE 254 

4. DOSSIERS PR^TS POUR L 'AUDIENCE: 

Dossiers en attente d'acheminement pour inscription au calendrier 

des audiences (note 1) 42 

5. INSCRIPTION AU CALENDRIER DES AUDIENCES: 

En attente - periode d'attente de deux semaines 3 

Dossiers en cours d' inscription 149 

Dossiers inscrits: 

JANVIER 1988 (4 SEMAINES) 110 

FEVRIER 1988 (4 SEMAINES) 77 

MARS 1988 (5 SEMAINES) 40 

AVRIL 1988 (4 SEMAINES) 31 

MAI 1988 (4 SEMAINES) 16 

JUIN 1988 (5 SEMAINES) 12 

NOMBRE TOTAL DE DOSSIERS INSCRITS (Note 2) 286 

NOMBRE TOTAL DE DOSSIERS AU STADE DE L' INSCRIPTION 438 

6. ** NOMBRE TOTAL DE DOSSIERS ACTIFS AU STADE PR^LABLE A L 'AUDIENCE ** 972 

7. DOSSIERS EN ATTENTE D 'AUDIENCE (Note 6) 

Dossiers impossibles a inscrire au calendrier 113 

Dossiers relatifs aux pensions - non revises/ reclassifies 1 

Dossiers traites/ajournes avant/pendant I 'audience (note 7) 4 

Dossiers inactifs 22 410 

XLVI 



ANNEXE H 



8. ** NOMBRE TOTAL DE DOSSIERS AU STADE PREALABLE A L 'AUDIENCE 

9. NOMBRE TOTAL DE DOSSIERS AU STADE POSTER I EUR A L' AUDIENCE: 
Cas attendant la decision du vice-president 



decision finale 
dec i s i on prov i so i re 



269 
1 



1 112 



TOTAL PART I EL 



270 



Cas dont I 'audience est en attente: 
Terminee, en attente 
En suspens 
Evolution inconnue 



98 

43 

3 



TOTAL PART I EL 



144 



** NOMBRE TOTAL DE DOSSIERS AU STADE POSTER I EUR A L' AUDIENCE ** 

10. NOMBRE DE DOSSIERS AU STADE POSTER I EUR A LA DECISION: 

Clarification 
Requete de I ' ombudsman 
Reexamen (note 5) 
Revision judiciaire 

** NOMBRE TOTAL DE DOSSIERS AU STADE POSTERIEUR A LA DECISION ** 



414 




79 

44 
6 



129 



NOMBRE TOTAL DE DOSSIERS AU TRIBUNAL 



1 655 



XLVII 



ANNEXE H 
ANALYSE DE LA CHARGE DE TRAVAIL HEBDOMADAIRE 

Au 30 Decembre 1988 

Notes explicatives: 

1. II y a A2 dossiers que le BCJT considere prets pour I 'audience mais pour lesquels le Service 
d' inscription n'a pas encore regu de formulaire d'achefninement. 

2. Les 286 dossiers inscrits au calendrier des audiences ne comprennent pas les dossiers suivants: 

Cas ayant fait I'objet d'une nouvelle convocation* 

Janvier 1988 9 

Fevrier 1988 4 

Mars 1988 3 

Avril 1988 1 

Mai 1988 1 

Juin 1988 1 

TOTAL ^ 

* Ces dossiers figurent deja dans la charge de travail au stade posterieur a I 'audience sous 
la mention audience "en suspens" ou "terminee, en attente" 

* Ces chiffres ne comprennent pas les dossiers pour lesquels une date d'audience provisoire a ete 
f ixee. 

3. Ces chiffres representent le nombre de dossiers pour lesquels le formulaire d'acheminement n'a pas 
encore ete envoye au traitement des donnees pour le traitement des nouveaux dossiers par le Service de 
reception. 

4. 1 1 y a 35 cas dont la description de cas porte la mention "NON". 

5. Trente-cinq des 44 demandes de reexamen courantes attendent la revision du jury d'audience. II y a de 
plus 5 demandes qui n'ont pas ete attribuees a un jury. 

6. II y a 269 cas en attente (revision du principe de la douleur chronique par la CAT). 

* Ce nombre comprend 27 cas de douleur chronique reclassifies "860-CP" par le Service de 
reception des dossiers. 

* Ce nombre ne tient pas compte des cas de douleur chronique attribues au BCJT (7 cas) et des 10 cas 
deja entendus. 

On a identifie 286 cas de pension pour la douleur chronique dont 229 ont ete acceptes par la CAT a la 
fin de la semaine terminee le 30 decembre 1988. 

7. C'est une categorie d'attente speciale pour les cas qui ont ete ajournes ou repousses au moment de 
I 'audience par le jury d'audience. II y a 7 cas "F-EN ATTENTE" dont trois de ceux qui ont ete 
repousses ont deja ete comptes dans la categorie "EN SUSPENS". 

8. Soixante de ces cas ont ete classes par le BCJT. 



XLVIII